Shooting the world’s longest building

Everytime I am with Thomas Hawk I grow more fond of his skills. Here’s just a small number of photos we shot in about an hour yesterday. Bebo White gave us part II of the Stanford Linear Accelerator tour. Part III will happen on April 20th. Here’s me shooting Bebo. What does the world’s longest building look like? This!

One thing I picked up about Thomas: he loves little grungy things. Put him in front of a water cooling tower that’s been running for decades and he could spend hours just shooting the goo-covered pipes. They are the goo that helped win three Nobel Prizes for Physics.

Next week at Northern Voice I’m gonna be blessed with hanging out with Kris Krug. He’s another gifted photographer. Hopefully we can get a Photowalk together there. Oh, and Northern Voice is almost sold out. So, if you wanna be there, you better get your ticket tonight.

UPDATE: here’s Thomas Hawk’s writeup of the tour.

14 thoughts on “Shooting the world’s longest building

  1. Anonymous,

    Pbase is ok. I’ve played around with it before. I don’t really care for the layout though and it lacks the social features that I think make a photo sharing site most interesting. I consider Pbase to be like WebShots which is to say a legacy photosharing product. It will have users and make money but at least as it sits now the growth is pretty much dead in the water. Mike Arrington reported that WebShots traffic was down 50% year over year recently.

    People want new things from photo sharing sites. I’m not as excited about Legacy sites unless they can reinvent themselves and innovate in interesting ways.

    In the history of photosharing PBase sits between the 1.0 printing companies like Shutterfly, Ofoto and Snapfish and the 2.0 companies like Flickr.

    Then there’s the cost thing. Pbase costs $23 a year for a limited account and $60 for a pro type level account. I’m not saying that there is anything wrong with paying for a good service. Don MacAskill charges more than that over at SmugMug but has carved out a niche of fanatical SmugMuggers and generates $10 million a year in revenue with it.

    But I think Flickr really set the bar for where photosharing is headed. And that is the most successful photo sharing sites will probably offer free and low cost options and be built around much more robust social networks than what PBase offers today (which is why PBase’s traffic is actually declining, not growing).

    I think that there are also more interesting ways to build a base of Pro level photographers. Allowing pros to sell stock photography for instance.

    What we are doing with Zooomr is creating a very inexpensive (one of the most generous free accounts with a low price pro account) photo sharing site with some of the most interesting social sharing features ever implemented in a photo sharing site. These social sharing features will be coming with our upcoming Mark III release in March when we will also introduce a stock photography platform opening up this billion dollar business (I don’t consider microstock really opening it up) for the first time ever.

    If PBase wants to be a contender in the new world of photo sharing I think they will need to innovate more than they have. I doubt they do it though. Because for now their legacy product is probably a cash cow and there’s less incentive to innovate. Same reason why Flickr’s probably slowed down quite a bit.

    The most exciting photo sharing sites of the future will be the one’s leading. Leading into stock photography. Leading into more intense social sharing platforms. Etc.

    Just my two cents and of course obviously I’m a bit biased and although Robert mentioned I was CEO of Zooomr, it’s worth saying it again just for disclosure.

  2. Anonymous,

    Pbase is ok. I’ve played around with it before. I don’t really care for the layout though and it lacks the social features that I think make a photo sharing site most interesting. I consider Pbase to be like WebShots which is to say a legacy photosharing product. It will have users and make money but at least as it sits now the growth is pretty much dead in the water. Mike Arrington reported that WebShots traffic was down 50% year over year recently.

    People want new things from photo sharing sites. I’m not as excited about Legacy sites unless they can reinvent themselves and innovate in interesting ways.

    In the history of photosharing PBase sits between the 1.0 printing companies like Shutterfly, Ofoto and Snapfish and the 2.0 companies like Flickr.

    Then there’s the cost thing. Pbase costs $23 a year for a limited account and $60 for a pro type level account. I’m not saying that there is anything wrong with paying for a good service. Don MacAskill charges more than that over at SmugMug but has carved out a niche of fanatical SmugMuggers and generates $10 million a year in revenue with it.

    But I think Flickr really set the bar for where photosharing is headed. And that is the most successful photo sharing sites will probably offer free and low cost options and be built around much more robust social networks than what PBase offers today (which is why PBase’s traffic is actually declining, not growing).

    I think that there are also more interesting ways to build a base of Pro level photographers. Allowing pros to sell stock photography for instance.

    What we are doing with Zooomr is creating a very inexpensive (one of the most generous free accounts with a low price pro account) photo sharing site with some of the most interesting social sharing features ever implemented in a photo sharing site. These social sharing features will be coming with our upcoming Mark III release in March when we will also introduce a stock photography platform opening up this billion dollar business (I don’t consider microstock really opening it up) for the first time ever.

    If PBase wants to be a contender in the new world of photo sharing I think they will need to innovate more than they have. I doubt they do it though. Because for now their legacy product is probably a cash cow and there’s less incentive to innovate. Same reason why Flickr’s probably slowed down quite a bit.

    The most exciting photo sharing sites of the future will be the one’s leading. Leading into stock photography. Leading into more intense social sharing platforms. Etc.

    Just my two cents and of course obviously I’m a bit biased and although Robert mentioned I was CEO of Zooomr, it’s worth saying it again just for disclosure.

  3. My wife and I will be at Northern Voices this year. looking forward to it, seemed to come up fast. We registered back in December just after I had dream that it sold out and we would not get to go :)

  4. My wife and I will be at Northern Voices this year. looking forward to it, seemed to come up fast. We registered back in December just after I had dream that it sold out and we would not get to go :)

  5. No name, because I like nicknames. Not involved with PBase, but just like it. They may not offer free hosting, I’m just an amateur photographer and what I like about PBase is that they post (or allow the option) to post the full EXIF information about a photo which allows me (as a learner) to see what types of lenses people are using…and all that other metadata.

    IMO, the fact that it’s not free filters out the crap. Most photographers that I know put stuff in multiple places like PBase, Photo.net and the ones you mention. But the free ones, like Flickr seem to be increasing in the amount “crap” out there. Good for the masses, but it waters down the artistic/photographic value with lots of “noise”. FWIW I would say the same of YouTube for the video market…just my opinion though.

  6. No name, because I like nicknames. Not involved with PBase, but just like it. They may not offer free hosting, I’m just an amateur photographer and what I like about PBase is that they post (or allow the option) to post the full EXIF information about a photo which allows me (as a learner) to see what types of lenses people are using…and all that other metadata.

    IMO, the fact that it’s not free filters out the crap. Most photographers that I know put stuff in multiple places like PBase, Photo.net and the ones you mention. But the free ones, like Flickr seem to be increasing in the amount “crap” out there. Good for the masses, but it waters down the artistic/photographic value with lots of “noise”. FWIW I would say the same of YouTube for the video market…just my opinion though.

  7. Say no more: Nope. He’s CEO of Zooomr. He also puts his stuff on Flickr. Weird. I haven’t heard about PBase for years. They don’t offer free hosting, at least I had some stuff there and they deleted it several years ago, which makes me distrust it as a brand.

    Most photographers I know are on Flickr, Zooomr, or SmugMug.

    By the way, why don’t you post your name? Is it because you’re involved with Pbase? If so, just be honest about it.

  8. Say no more: Nope. He’s CEO of Zooomr. He also puts his stuff on Flickr. Weird. I haven’t heard about PBase for years. They don’t offer free hosting, at least I had some stuff there and they deleted it several years ago, which makes me distrust it as a brand.

    Most photographers I know are on Flickr, Zooomr, or SmugMug.

    By the way, why don’t you post your name? Is it because you’re involved with Pbase? If so, just be honest about it.

  9. I’d be interested to see if Thomas puts his stuff up on PBase. For real photogs, http://www.pbase.com is a much better site…for people who really love the craft. If he has his stuff up there, please paste a link.

  10. I’d be interested to see if Thomas puts his stuff up on PBase. For real photogs, http://www.pbase.com is a much better site…for people who really love the craft. If he has his stuff up there, please paste a link.

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