Kind compliments about ScobleShow (why don’t historical videos get watched?)

In the past month I’ve gotten a lot of people doing the metaphorical equivilent of yelling and screaming at me, so it’s nice when I get some compliments too. Here’s a couple:

Adnans Sysadmin Blog:

“Perhaps its Scoble’s enthusiasm or passion, or his really loud and excited laugh. But ever since Scoble left channel 9, I haven’t been able to watch more than five minutes of a channel 9 video. Perhaps it was how the camera was always moving, looking at the screen, following the conversation. I keep clicking on the channel9 videos, as they show up on techmeme, but it just isn’t fun any more.

On the other hand, every scobleshow video is watched completely. Take this scobleshow video for instance.”

Loren Feldman:

“I was looking around Podtech and I came across this from Scoble. I watched the whole thing! No kidding. I’m a huge Hugh fan, and the whole thing was awesome. I know I’m alone in this but I like Scoble’s laugh he’s having such a good time it seems. ”

One interesting thing is that the video tour of CERN hasn’t gotten any comments at all. It’s really sad that historical videos don’t get as much traffic (I’ve noticed this trend before — my previous tour of the Computer History Museum got a lot less traffic and comments than other videos I’d done, even though it was done by one of the greats in our field, Gordon Bell).

What’s important of the tour of CERN? It was done by the guy who freaking pushed for TCP/IP. Without him the Web wouldn’t have happened at CERN and we wouldn’t have known Tim Berners-Lee. Not to mention the work that CERN is about to embark on will have a bigger impact on what we know about the world universe everything than anything Google, or Microsoft, or any Web 2.0 company will do over the next four years.

37 thoughts on “Kind compliments about ScobleShow (why don’t historical videos get watched?)

  1. Hey, I watched it (the CERN video) without even pausing once! =)
    Wonderful stuff.
    I submitted it to stumbleupon as well.

    Keep up the good job =]

  2. Hey, I watched it (the CERN video) without even pausing once! =)
    Wonderful stuff.
    I submitted it to stumbleupon as well.

    Keep up the good job =]

  3. Hey, I watched it (the CERN video) without even pausing once! =)
    Wonderful stuff.
    I submitted it to stumbleupon as well.

    Keep up the good job =]

  4. BTW, I never have time to watch long videos, but I watch a lot of TV, especially when doing something away from the computer- like folding laundry.

    The longer flash videos broke, shorter ones worked fine. I watched all of Matt Kelly’s videos on the Nintendo Wii, right from the Podtech homepage.

    *hopes this doesn’t turn the thread into this long vs short video debate*

  5. BTW, I never have time to watch long videos, but I watch a lot of TV, especially when doing something away from the computer- like folding laundry.

    The longer flash videos broke, shorter ones worked fine. I watched all of Matt Kelly’s videos on the Nintendo Wii, right from the Podtech homepage.

    *hopes this doesn’t turn the thread into this long vs short video debate*

  6. BTW, I never have time to watch long videos, but I watch a lot of TV, especially when doing something away from the computer- like folding laundry.

    The longer flash videos broke, shorter ones worked fine. I watched all of Matt Kelly’s videos on the Nintendo Wii, right from the Podtech homepage.

    *hopes this doesn’t turn the thread into this long vs short video debate*

  7. Awesome, #8 nailed it.

    Youtube vs. PBS, that’s the space between– it’s ever-so bizarre. Doesn’t actually surprise me that it didn’t get comments. It’s high level content. Ever see the comments on YouTube? Utter crap. But hey, it’s a traffic giver and traffic = money and wow lookie where we are again!

    The wider the appeal, the bigger the audience, and the more you’ll see the ‘woodwork effect’… this is a partial flaw I find when hearing about ‘the conversation’– believe me, I’m working on a show that I know will be raged on. Why? Cuz we have keyboards, that’s why– well, if we’re in the mood to. Heh.

    Never be afraid to do something again, even if someone did it before. That’s another myth for another day. :-)

  8. Awesome, #8 nailed it.

    Youtube vs. PBS, that’s the space between– it’s ever-so bizarre. Doesn’t actually surprise me that it didn’t get comments. It’s high level content. Ever see the comments on YouTube? Utter crap. But hey, it’s a traffic giver and traffic = money and wow lookie where we are again!

    The wider the appeal, the bigger the audience, and the more you’ll see the ‘woodwork effect’… this is a partial flaw I find when hearing about ‘the conversation’– believe me, I’m working on a show that I know will be raged on. Why? Cuz we have keyboards, that’s why– well, if we’re in the mood to. Heh.

    Never be afraid to do something again, even if someone did it before. That’s another myth for another day. :-)

  9. Awesome, #8 nailed it.

    Youtube vs. PBS, that’s the space between– it’s ever-so bizarre. Doesn’t actually surprise me that it didn’t get comments. It’s high level content. Ever see the comments on YouTube? Utter crap. But hey, it’s a traffic giver and traffic = money and wow lookie where we are again!

    The wider the appeal, the bigger the audience, and the more you’ll see the ‘woodwork effect’… this is a partial flaw I find when hearing about ‘the conversation’– believe me, I’m working on a show that I know will be raged on. Why? Cuz we have keyboards, that’s why– well, if we’re in the mood to. Heh.

    Never be afraid to do something again, even if someone did it before. That’s another myth for another day. :-)

  10. Please don’t despair. There must be lots of folks like me who have you on the list of “To watch when I have some quiet time”. Unlike 3 minute videos of Weird Al spoofs, your videos are the sort of content that deserves full attention. The meat & potatoes of videoblogging today.

  11. Please don’t despair. There must be lots of folks like me who have you on the list of “To watch when I have some quiet time”. Unlike 3 minute videos of Weird Al spoofs, your videos are the sort of content that deserves full attention. The meat & potatoes of videoblogging today.

  12. Please don’t despair. There must be lots of folks like me who have you on the list of “To watch when I have some quiet time”. Unlike 3 minute videos of Weird Al spoofs, your videos are the sort of content that deserves full attention. The meat & potatoes of videoblogging today.

  13. Please don’t stop doing these kind videos because you see the stats don’t match up with the other ones.

    It is always harder to follow one of these clips than a shorter more ‘current’ (cool?) video, but remember this flicks will (should) stay up online forever and they’ll be history recorded of the people who really did something basic and important for the rest of us.

    The other videos are ‘just business’ ;-)

    By the way, when are you going to film the people who made seti @home (http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/)?

  14. Please don’t stop doing these kind videos because you see the stats don’t match up with the other ones.

    It is always harder to follow one of these clips than a shorter more ‘current’ (cool?) video, but remember this flicks will (should) stay up online forever and they’ll be history recorded of the people who really did something basic and important for the rest of us.

    The other videos are ‘just business’ ;-)

    By the way, when are you going to film the people who made seti @home (http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/)?

  15. Please don’t stop doing these kind videos because you see the stats don’t match up with the other ones.

    It is always harder to follow one of these clips than a shorter more ‘current’ (cool?) video, but remember this flicks will (should) stay up online forever and they’ll be history recorded of the people who really did something basic and important for the rest of us.

    The other videos are ‘just business’ ;-)

    By the way, when are you going to film the people who made seti @home (http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/)?

  16. Long tail, you’re videos will be found and viewed.

    It’s been a few weeks since I made my last one hour video, but I’m still getting 50 views a day.

    Think of yourself as PBS, if you want a gazillion views go on YouTube and act like a fool.

  17. Long tail, you’re videos will be found and viewed.

    It’s been a few weeks since I made my last one hour video, but I’m still getting 50 views a day.

    Think of yourself as PBS, if you want a gazillion views go on YouTube and act like a fool.

  18. Long tail, you’re videos will be found and viewed.

    It’s been a few weeks since I made my last one hour video, but I’m still getting 50 views a day.

    Think of yourself as PBS, if you want a gazillion views go on YouTube and act like a fool.

  19. Please don’t give up on these kind of videos Robert. I think they’re really interesting… and, if they’re not (yet) generating comments or views, they’re certainly generating blog entries… e.g. see my blog entry, “Interested in computing? Take a look at the LHC” @

    http://www.psynixis.com/blog/2007/02/17/interested-in-computing-take-a-look-at-the-lhc/

    The point is: the same community that built the world wide web is now taking things to the next level in terms of computing. Anyone that’s interested in computing technology should probably be at least *aware* of this stuff… it could easily be affecting their own Internet experiences in a few years.

  20. Please don’t give up on these kind of videos Robert. I think they’re really interesting… and, if they’re not (yet) generating comments or views, they’re certainly generating blog entries… e.g. see my blog entry, “Interested in computing? Take a look at the LHC” @

    http://www.psynixis.com/blog/2007/02/17/interested-in-computing-take-a-look-at-the-lhc/

    The point is: the same community that built the world wide web is now taking things to the next level in terms of computing. Anyone that’s interested in computing technology should probably be at least *aware* of this stuff… it could easily be affecting their own Internet experiences in a few years.

  21. Please don’t give up on these kind of videos Robert. I think they’re really interesting… and, if they’re not (yet) generating comments or views, they’re certainly generating blog entries… e.g. see my blog entry, “Interested in computing? Take a look at the LHC” @

    http://www.psynixis.com/blog/2007/02/17/interested-in-computing-take-a-look-at-the-lhc/

    The point is: the same community that built the world wide web is now taking things to the next level in terms of computing. Anyone that’s interested in computing technology should probably be at least *aware* of this stuff… it could easily be affecting their own Internet experiences in a few years.

  22. I think if you produce shows with strong historical content, you’re filming in the same space as mainstream documentaries. People who like those kinds of productions aren’t your regular subscribers. To get to that niche audience, you have to get a MSM review of the historical richness of several of your recent productions.

    From inside the halls of an academic institution, that’s how I think it would work. You have to be listed as a virtual library asset and that kind of reach is normally outside the social media network.

  23. I think if you produce shows with strong historical content, you’re filming in the same space as mainstream documentaries. People who like those kinds of productions aren’t your regular subscribers. To get to that niche audience, you have to get a MSM review of the historical richness of several of your recent productions.

    From inside the halls of an academic institution, that’s how I think it would work. You have to be listed as a virtual library asset and that kind of reach is normally outside the social media network.

  24. I think if you produce shows with strong historical content, you’re filming in the same space as mainstream documentaries. People who like those kinds of productions aren’t your regular subscribers. To get to that niche audience, you have to get a MSM review of the historical richness of several of your recent productions.

    From inside the halls of an academic institution, that’s how I think it would work. You have to be listed as a virtual library asset and that kind of reach is normally outside the social media network.

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