Meeting Marc Andreessen (and a few others)

Yesterday Tuesday was another wild day in my life. I met Marc Andreessen, who was doing a press tour, with Ning, showing off something you’ll see on ScobleShow soon. He visited Om Malik too, who noticed that Marc had switched to a Mac. Ning, he told me, is the best way to build custom social Websites. More on that soon (he, and co-founder Gina Bianchini, showed me stuff that he asked me not to talk about until next week).

But, in the last two days I’ve met some other incredible people. Meeting Marc was over the top, though (he started Netscape). I told him that my son was born the same year that Netscape was started and we compared notes about just how much has changed in the world (and what he learned from the Netscape experience that he’s applying to Ning).

Here’s the schedule.

It started Tuesday when I had lunch with Mark Ivey. He used to write for BusinessWeek, among other pubs, and wrote speeches for Scott McNealy, among other titans of tech industry. Interesting guy, he’s fascinated by the changes happening to media and PR and is thinking of writing a book since he’s been on both sides of that fence (he worked in PR at Intel and other companies).

OK, that was noon. At 2 p.m. Eric Goldstein, CEO of ClipMarks came over to show me a killer way to “clip” interesting stuff around the Web.

At 4 p.m. Marc Andreessen and Gina Bianchini, co-founder of Ning, came by. More soon.

At 5 p.m. Martin Nyman of BestBuy came by to talk about technology retailing (he works with VCs and entrepreneurs to make sure BestBuy has the coolest stuff in its stores).

At 6:30 p.m. I was headed over to Stanford for the MIT/Stanford Venture Lab, where I introduced Martin Eberhard, CEO of Tesla Motors, who gave a great speech about why electric cars are the future. I then moderated a panel discussion with Martin, Robert Acker, SVP at Dash Navigation, Dave Blakely, Director of Technology Strategy at IDEO, and Dave Mathews, Director of Product Innovation at Sling Media. Ryan Junee has a good writeup of the evening, hope that someone recorded it, cause it was quite an evening and I was very honored to just be on stage with such a great group of people.

Then yesterday we flew to Seattle, where another full day started.

Buzz Bruggeman, CEO of Activewords, picked us up at the airport and took us to Chris and Ponzi Pirillo’s house where we heard all about Gnomedex 2007 plans. I told Chris that Gnomedex is still the only conference in the world where you’ll see hundreds of people — almost all of whom are on their computers during the conference. They are looking for sponsors and speakers, but already have some really cool things planned.

Then onto visit with David Geller, founder of EyeJot. This is a video email service. Finally got a good demo that we’ll get up on ScobleShow someday (I have quite a backlog of tapes to play first).

At 3 p.m. I met with John Pollard and Shreedhar Madhavapeddi, founders of Jott. This is the thing I’ll use the most. It’s a service for your cell phone. Let’s say you’re at a party and you think of something you want to remember. Well, you probably can’t find paper and pen, so what you do is call Jott’s phone number (it knows you by your caller ID) leave a 30 second message about what you want to remember, then it converts that into text and emails that to you, along with a link to your original audio recording. This rocks. Buzz didn’t know we were going to meet with them (he’s driving me around) and said he’s been using the service for weeks and already finds it invaluable.

At 4 p.m. we visited with Michael Young, CTO, and Glenn Kelman, CEO of RedFin. They are working to be the place you buy and sell homes on the Web. They showed me how they are now using bloggers to add comments about homes that they’ve visited. We had a long conversation about how RedFin is disrupting the real estate industry.

At 5:30 p.m. we got invited to the top of one of Seattle’s skyscrapers for wine tasting at the home of one of Seattle’s venture capitalists, Petra Franklin, principal of Vault Capital. I’m going to note that Petra is a woman, cause it’s so rare to meet a woman at this level. Remarkable woman and a remarkable home. Real treat to get to spend some time with her.

OK, today (Thursday) we’ve got a full schedule. I’m being picked up at 8 a.m. Breakfast with Buzz, then onto Amazon at 10 a.m. to see something that they weren’t willing to talk about on the phone (always fun when that happens).

At 11:30 a.m. meeting with JamGlue (cool DJ/remixing service), at 1 p.m. meeting with MixPo, (mix video/audio and more into a Web-based widget) at 3 p.m. meeting with TeamDirection, (project and task management for Sharepoint and Groove) at 4 p.m. meeting with SmileBox, (fun digital storytelling for people) and at 7 p.m. Chris and Ponzi are throwing Maryam and me a little shindig at their beautiful new home.

Whew. Sorry if I couldn’t fit you in on this trip.

Oh, and I even got through most of my feed reading tonight for my link blog. Email is suffering, though.

Comments

  1. Interesting that you got through your feeds, but left e-mail. For most people e-mail is more personal and usually more important to keep up with.
    I start my morning routine by reading e-mail followed by my feeds, and whenever I don’t have enough time for all, I simple read less feeds that day.
    Of course, in your business it is more important to stay on top of the news, which might explain your priorities….

  2. Interesting that you got through your feeds, but left e-mail. For most people e-mail is more personal and usually more important to keep up with.
    I start my morning routine by reading e-mail followed by my feeds, and whenever I don’t have enough time for all, I simple read less feeds that day.
    Of course, in your business it is more important to stay on top of the news, which might explain your priorities….

  3. Gnomedex is proof that ‘cons just aren’t for Comic Book fans anymore. An entire conference with the new scintillating message “THE WEB IS COOL!” and not a bit of common sense to be found.

    All it needs is for Scoble to be wearing the Tron suit, a few catgirls, and it would be PERFECT.

  4. Gnomedex is proof that ‘cons just aren’t for Comic Book fans anymore. An entire conference with the new scintillating message “THE WEB IS COOL!” and not a bit of common sense to be found.

    All it needs is for Scoble to be wearing the Tron suit, a few catgirls, and it would be PERFECT.

  5. Robert…With a schedule like that, do you ever have time for reflection/absorption? One of my early mentors told me to always reserve an hour or two each day to just sit back, think, reflect, and absorb or most of the really important things of the day will be lost. I still believe and follow that.

  6. Robert…With a schedule like that, do you ever have time for reflection/absorption? One of my early mentors told me to always reserve an hour or two each day to just sit back, think, reflect, and absorb or most of the really important things of the day will be lost. I still believe and follow that.

  7. Robert…

    I was very disappointed with your participation (or lack thereof) in the Stanford VLAB panel.

    First, it was very evident that you took absolutely no time to prepare for the panel. When Martin Eberhard of Tesla Motors finished his presentation, you were introduced. You then looked at the audience and said “Ummmm, Well, …..” and had to think of even the first question to pose to the panel.

    Second, the Stanford/MIT VLAB (www.vlab.org), the organizer and sponsor of the event, is about promoting entrepreneurship, not discussing the roles of women in engineering. Yet your first 5 minutes were spent on that topic. The _audience_ had to redirect you to the topic at hand. That was _your_ role as moderator (to control/redirect the discussion).

    Third, your asked only 1 question the entire night, although you repeated it many times. You would give a long-winded 5 minute lead-up to the question “tell me what’s in the future?” A moderator should ask the panel to discuss with the audience, not with himself. Also, a variety of topics and questions would have helped.

    Fourth, you did not ask for or generate any interaction among the panel members, which is what panel presentations are all about.

    Fifth, the panel was titled “Consumer Products Innovation 2007″. You never even broached this topic.

    I understand from you blog post that you’ve had a few busy days, meeting people. If you’re too busy to do your job, you should consider scaling back on your commitments.

    The next time you agree to moderate a panel discussion, please tell us in advance if you’re prepared, rather than waste the time and money of a couple of hundred people.

  8. Robert…

    I was very disappointed with your participation (or lack thereof) in the Stanford VLAB panel.

    First, it was very evident that you took absolutely no time to prepare for the panel. When Martin Eberhard of Tesla Motors finished his presentation, you were introduced. You then looked at the audience and said “Ummmm, Well, …..” and had to think of even the first question to pose to the panel.

    Second, the Stanford/MIT VLAB (www.vlab.org), the organizer and sponsor of the event, is about promoting entrepreneurship, not discussing the roles of women in engineering. Yet your first 5 minutes were spent on that topic. The _audience_ had to redirect you to the topic at hand. That was _your_ role as moderator (to control/redirect the discussion).

    Third, your asked only 1 question the entire night, although you repeated it many times. You would give a long-winded 5 minute lead-up to the question “tell me what’s in the future?” A moderator should ask the panel to discuss with the audience, not with himself. Also, a variety of topics and questions would have helped.

    Fourth, you did not ask for or generate any interaction among the panel members, which is what panel presentations are all about.

    Fifth, the panel was titled “Consumer Products Innovation 2007″. You never even broached this topic.

    I understand from you blog post that you’ve had a few busy days, meeting people. If you’re too busy to do your job, you should consider scaling back on your commitments.

    The next time you agree to moderate a panel discussion, please tell us in advance if you’re prepared, rather than waste the time and money of a couple of hundred people.

  9. Jack: I’m sorry you didn’t get value out of that. I got many compliments from that evening, so thought it went pretty well. But, I’ll try to do better next time, if there’s a next time.

  10. Jack: I’m sorry you didn’t get value out of that. I got many compliments from that evening, so thought it went pretty well. But, I’ll try to do better next time, if there’s a next time.

  11. [...] Robert Scoble pointed me to Jott the cool reminder service that works easily on the go. Just call the Jott number with your cell phone. It recognizes you by your caller ID. Leave a reminder message and hang up. Jott does the rest. They transcribe the message and send you an email. In my first test it only got part of my message but it also include the link to the original recording. [...]

  12. “I got many compliments from that evening, so thought it went pretty well.”

    Beware of conflating suck-uppery with validation.

    This post served no apparent purpose other than to brag about how many shoulders you got to rub, increasing your brand atop them rather than through any merit of your own.

  13. “I got many compliments from that evening, so thought it went pretty well.”

    Beware of conflating suck-uppery with validation.

    This post served no apparent purpose other than to brag about how many shoulders you got to rub, increasing your brand atop them rather than through any merit of your own.