I still love Xbox, TabletPCs, Media Center, Halo, etc.

Liz Lawley wonders why I hyped up all things Microsoft when I worked there, but now don’t get excited anymore. She missed that I was only talking about Internet stuff that goes in the Web browser, not stuff that Microsoft is more traditionally known for like Windows and Xbox and all that. I don’t remember too many things I hyped up back then that were Web services. Virtual Earth is one glaring example. Yeah, that still wows me. I still love a lot about Microsoft (the first time, if you remember, I saw Office 2007′s new interface I said “wow”) but look at the examples Liz got excited about. Do they really make you go “wow?”

I still get excited by Vista, Halo, Tablet PCs, new mice, etc.

UPDATE: One area where I was wow’ed and now am seeing that wow tempered is Windows Presentation Foundation. It builds the coolest demos (see Tim Sneath’s blog). But now that I have a Macintosh I find it isn’t nearly as interesting as when I lived in Windows-only world. Why? Cause WPF/E isn’t done, doesn’t run every WPF application, and for tools developers will need to use Windows (the best tools, Expression and Visual Studio are Windows only).

Oh, and Liz, I hate your comments. I have to register just to leave you a comment. That sucks.

The real point here is to look at the commentary my post started. Not many people could come up with things that Microsoft has done lately that get them excited about its stance on the Internet. Can anyone else come up with some?

231 thoughts on “I still love Xbox, TabletPCs, Media Center, Halo, etc.

  1. This is the only reason i wanted to remain anonymous. Because i strongly fely onlce my MS identity is established nobody even tries to see the actual viewpoint. They just assume you are defending microsoft because you work there.

    Only if you come across as feeling the need to counter every criticism of Microsoft. When that happens, people think “Hey, Microsoft doesn’t listen unless you say what they want to hear”.

  2. This is the only reason i wanted to remain anonymous. Because i strongly fely onlce my MS identity is established nobody even tries to see the actual viewpoint. They just assume you are defending microsoft because you work there.

    Only if you come across as feeling the need to counter every criticism of Microsoft. When that happens, people think “Hey, Microsoft doesn’t listen unless you say what they want to hear”.

  3. @95
    “My viewpoint is dilluted because one could say I am from Microsoft”

    This is the only reason i wanted to remain anonymous. Because i strongly fely onlce my MS identity is established nobody even tries to see the actual viewpoint. They just assume you are defending microsoft because you work there.

    ” could have wrote anything whereas I had to be more careful to protect my real life credibility”

    *realization*
    I have never looked at anonymous comments from this angle until now. I see how it puts you on an unfair advantage on a debate with a named guy. So here i stop doing that. (To give some real background – I work as a tester in the C# compiler team)

  4. @95
    “My viewpoint is dilluted because one could say I am from Microsoft”

    This is the only reason i wanted to remain anonymous. Because i strongly fely onlce my MS identity is established nobody even tries to see the actual viewpoint. They just assume you are defending microsoft because you work there.

    ” could have wrote anything whereas I had to be more careful to protect my real life credibility”

    *realization*
    I have never looked at anonymous comments from this angle until now. I see how it puts you on an unfair advantage on a debate with a named guy. So here i stop doing that. (To give some real background – I work as a tester in the C# compiler team)

  5. Hey Robert, Re your comments to my comment.

    Darren: If Visual Studio is such a great tool how come almost none of the Office or Windows developers who work at Microsoft use it? If it’s so much more productive than other approaches, why doesn’t Microsoft ITSELF bet on that tool?

    I was actually talking about web development and asp.net 2.0 not windows application development.

    I have no knowledge to what MS does internally but from an end user point of view they have put a lot of thought and detail into making asp.net 2.0 a great platform for getting stuff done.

  6. Hey Robert, Re your comments to my comment.

    Darren: If Visual Studio is such a great tool how come almost none of the Office or Windows developers who work at Microsoft use it? If it’s so much more productive than other approaches, why doesn’t Microsoft ITSELF bet on that tool?

    I was actually talking about web development and asp.net 2.0 not windows application development.

    I have no knowledge to what MS does internally but from an end user point of view they have put a lot of thought and detail into making asp.net 2.0 a great platform for getting stuff done.

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  8. Robert, in that case I would like to know information you could derive from LayZ’s IP address.

    I had few comments exchanged with LayZ on your blog before I gave up for two reasons. 1. LayZ could have wrote anything whereas I had to be more careful to protect my real life credibility. 2. My viewpoint is dilluted because one could say I am from Microsoft. But the same could not have been said about LayZ’s comment.

    (I apologize LayZ. Your id is just for explaining the point. But the disadvantages 1. and 2., I mentioned above were exactly the reasons I gave up arguing with anonymous people.)

  9. Robert, in that case I would like to know information you could derive from LayZ’s IP address.

    I had few comments exchanged with LayZ on your blog before I gave up for two reasons. 1. LayZ could have wrote anything whereas I had to be more careful to protect my real life credibility. 2. My viewpoint is dilluted because one could say I am from Microsoft. But the same could not have been said about LayZ’s comment.

    (I apologize LayZ. Your id is just for explaining the point. But the disadvantages 1. and 2., I mentioned above were exactly the reasons I gave up arguing with anonymous people.)

  10. Sure, there is no expectation of private information. But for whatever reason blogger@wordpress did not want to explicitly reveal his/her relationship with Microsoft.

    However, it does explain their angle for their opinions.

    But, that’s not the point again. You arguing that mainframes matter? Just cause IBM is selling a shitload of them?

    No, I’ll argue they matter because they still run a shitload of the world’s banking transactions, are designed not to crash, are able to handle, per machine, loads that would make a Windows box run away crapping its drawers, and have been using technology that the PC world is just now mainstreaming.

    If you think Mainframes don’t matter, you really ARE clueless.

    Microsoft isn’t going away anytime soon, but they are essentially repeating the mistakes IBM made from about 1980 to Gerstner.

  11. Sure, there is no expectation of private information. But for whatever reason blogger@wordpress did not want to explicitly reveal his/her relationship with Microsoft.

    However, it does explain their angle for their opinions.

    But, that’s not the point again. You arguing that mainframes matter? Just cause IBM is selling a shitload of them?

    No, I’ll argue they matter because they still run a shitload of the world’s banking transactions, are designed not to crash, are able to handle, per machine, loads that would make a Windows box run away crapping its drawers, and have been using technology that the PC world is just now mainstreaming.

    If you think Mainframes don’t matter, you really ARE clueless.

    Microsoft isn’t going away anytime soon, but they are essentially repeating the mistakes IBM made from about 1980 to Gerstner.

  12. Good Grief, Scoble. You really don’t know how to make an argument for your position. Just because you supposedly talk to a lot of people–people supposedly representing “major companies” and “F100″ companies does not prove your argument. Major corporations have their hands in all types of technologies. Just because some random person from some F100 company shows up at a salesforce.com conference doesn’t mean that company is not being “wowed” by Microsoft. Jeff (from Office) makes just as compelling an argument that major corporations are being wowed by Microsoft because of the things they are doing. Using the Bandwagon fallacy does not prove your argument.

    Also, whenever I see someone setting themselves up as some sort of authority to prove their argument, I can pretty much discount their position. In logic, this is know as “appealing to misleading authority” You attempt to set yourself up as an authority by using anecdotal data. You seem to use this position of authority argument when you are unable to prove your point with any quantifiable data. Unless or until you can prove your point with verifiable data, all we have is your opinion. Thus, those defending Microsoft come from just as credible a position.

  13. Good Grief, Scoble. You really don’t know how to make an argument for your position. Just because you supposedly talk to a lot of people–people supposedly representing “major companies” and “F100″ companies does not prove your argument. Major corporations have their hands in all types of technologies. Just because some random person from some F100 company shows up at a salesforce.com conference doesn’t mean that company is not being “wowed” by Microsoft. Jeff (from Office) makes just as compelling an argument that major corporations are being wowed by Microsoft because of the things they are doing. Using the Bandwagon fallacy does not prove your argument.

    Also, whenever I see someone setting themselves up as some sort of authority to prove their argument, I can pretty much discount their position. In logic, this is know as “appealing to misleading authority” You attempt to set yourself up as an authority by using anecdotal data. You seem to use this position of authority argument when you are unable to prove your point with any quantifiable data. Unless or until you can prove your point with verifiable data, all we have is your opinion. Thus, those defending Microsoft come from just as credible a position.

  14. Robert@25, you released blogger@wordpress personal information (his/her IP address) which is only available to you and he/she did not explictly want to make it public.

    You post to a public website, you takes your chances.

  15. Robert@25, you released blogger@wordpress personal information (his/her IP address) which is only available to you and he/she did not explictly want to make it public.

    You post to a public website, you takes your chances.

  16. #88: I don’t plan on throwing it away. But, then, I’m not going to just be a synchophant either. I have stock in Microsoft (only company I do, actually) and so I have a vested interest in seeing you guys grow.

    I don’t know Kevin. Didn’t have 1:1 conversations with him, just saw him speak to our group twice. Thought he was focusing on the right things, but, yeah, haven’t heard him do anything specific to make Microsoft more interesting, er, grow faster.

    As for Office, I saw quite a bit of the coolest stuff there. It’s interesting, but there’ll be more to say after the Office 2.0 conference that’s coming up about that.

    Microsoft is a 100 year company, even if they, er, you, do everything wrong. There’s no way it’s going away. Microsoft didn’t make IBM go away, even though Microsoft kicked IBM’s ass for 20+ years.

    When I throw darts Microsoft’s way, it’s just over growth. That’s all. I don’t see any negative financials coming. If they do, they’ll totally shock me. Microsoft is going to continue being one of the best businesses the world has ever seen for as far into the future that I can see.

    But that’s not what I’m talking about here.

  17. #88: I don’t plan on throwing it away. But, then, I’m not going to just be a synchophant either. I have stock in Microsoft (only company I do, actually) and so I have a vested interest in seeing you guys grow.

    I don’t know Kevin. Didn’t have 1:1 conversations with him, just saw him speak to our group twice. Thought he was focusing on the right things, but, yeah, haven’t heard him do anything specific to make Microsoft more interesting, er, grow faster.

    As for Office, I saw quite a bit of the coolest stuff there. It’s interesting, but there’ll be more to say after the Office 2.0 conference that’s coming up about that.

    Microsoft is a 100 year company, even if they, er, you, do everything wrong. There’s no way it’s going away. Microsoft didn’t make IBM go away, even though Microsoft kicked IBM’s ass for 20+ years.

    When I throw darts Microsoft’s way, it’s just over growth. That’s all. I don’t see any negative financials coming. If they do, they’ll totally shock me. Microsoft is going to continue being one of the best businesses the world has ever seen for as far into the future that I can see.

    But that’s not what I’m talking about here.

  18. @87…

    Your MSFT org chart is getting a little rusty. Kevin Johnson isn’t the President of the Office division. Jeff Raikes is. Kevin is over Windows.

  19. @87…

    Your MSFT org chart is getting a little rusty. Kevin Johnson isn’t the President of the Office division. Jeff Raikes is. Kevin is over Windows.

  20. Won’t argue with you on stock price. But it didn’t take a rocket scientist to see that Google and Amazone or others were going to be more innovative or quick to market or have better margins. So Kevin noticed, big deal, how long did it take him, what did he do about it. Even before he joined Windows he was in the SLT, he could have effected change…nothing. Nope, that issue is endemic to MSFT leadership…and I hate it. I won’t apologize for it. But don’t confuse that with your original post. All coolness doesn’t happen with web apps. And there are corners at the company you castigate that you have not seen, are not in your space, or are struggling to get stuff done the way that they know the industry wants to see it done. I can burn bridges (as you say) with Kevin, because I never had them. The few 1:1 conversations I had with him were disappointing at best and showed him as shortsighted and vision-less. My point on bridge burning was that you spent your time at MSFT as an ambassador, evangelist and bridge builder. Don’t throw that good will away. Regardless of the market, Microsoft will be a going concern…hopefully going faster in years to come. :-)

  21. Won’t argue with you on stock price. But it didn’t take a rocket scientist to see that Google and Amazone or others were going to be more innovative or quick to market or have better margins. So Kevin noticed, big deal, how long did it take him, what did he do about it. Even before he joined Windows he was in the SLT, he could have effected change…nothing. Nope, that issue is endemic to MSFT leadership…and I hate it. I won’t apologize for it. But don’t confuse that with your original post. All coolness doesn’t happen with web apps. And there are corners at the company you castigate that you have not seen, are not in your space, or are struggling to get stuff done the way that they know the industry wants to see it done. I can burn bridges (as you say) with Kevin, because I never had them. The few 1:1 conversations I had with him were disappointing at best and showed him as shortsighted and vision-less. My point on bridge burning was that you spent your time at MSFT as an ambassador, evangelist and bridge builder. Don’t throw that good will away. Regardless of the market, Microsoft will be a going concern…hopefully going faster in years to come. :-)

  22. John: #83. That’s true. But then companies are still using mainframes. I know, I just sat next to a VP from IBM (they are seeing lots of big sales in enterprises, particularly in airlines and banking). You know, that company that Microsoft was supposed to kill. :-)

    But, that’s not the point again. You arguing that mainframes matter? Just cause IBM is selling a shitload of them?

    The PC was more important for the past 30 years because it grew more.

    The Web is gonna grow more over the next 30 years than the PC will.

    That doesn’t mean that PCs are going away. Doesn’t mean Office is going away. It just means all that stuff is less important cause it won’t bring growth to Microsoft.

    Kevin Johnson might be a moron, but he did notice that Microsoft’s butt is getting kicked by Apple, Google, Amazon, eBay.

    Add up the stock prices of those — go over to Google Finance and compare the five-year charts. It’s stunning the difference. http://finance.google.com/finance?q=AAPL

  23. John: #83. That’s true. But then companies are still using mainframes. I know, I just sat next to a VP from IBM (they are seeing lots of big sales in enterprises, particularly in airlines and banking). You know, that company that Microsoft was supposed to kill. :-)

    But, that’s not the point again. You arguing that mainframes matter? Just cause IBM is selling a shitload of them?

    The PC was more important for the past 30 years because it grew more.

    The Web is gonna grow more over the next 30 years than the PC will.

    That doesn’t mean that PCs are going away. Doesn’t mean Office is going away. It just means all that stuff is less important cause it won’t bring growth to Microsoft.

    Kevin Johnson might be a moron, but he did notice that Microsoft’s butt is getting kicked by Apple, Google, Amazon, eBay.

    Add up the stock prices of those — go over to Google Finance and compare the five-year charts. It’s stunning the difference. http://finance.google.com/finance?q=AAPL

  24. BTW…I don’t work for Kevin, I work for Jeff, I’m in Office, Jeff is much less of a moron, I liked him when he was running sales and like him now. At least he had the balls to ditch Anoop (for example).

  25. BTW…I don’t work for Kevin, I work for Jeff, I’m in Office, Jeff is much less of a moron, I liked him when he was running sales and like him now. At least he had the balls to ditch Anoop (for example).

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