Interesting blog PR insight from political side of the fence

I’m trying not to write much about politics cause that’s not really what we’re all here for. But I do still watch lots of political blogs on both the right and left side of the American fence for insights that I can bring into the corporate world that I usually talk with. Here’s one, in Salon, by Lindsay Beyerstein on why she refused to blog for John Edwards.

The learning here is interesting. How might you apply that thinking to your corporate blog team?

A few things:

1) Listen to advice when given by someone who you want to hire anyway.
2) An organization’s “brand” is made up by all its participants. Microsoft is more than Bill Gates. The sins of the participants will be used against all.
3) The no-asshole rule should apply. Hint: people around you might judge who is an asshole differently than you do. (by the way, that rule in my head comes from a good book called “the No Asshole Rule,” here’s a video by its author who is a Stanford Professor). Now, I piss off people as much as the next guy, but this rule should be considered, particularly in political organizations.

8 thoughts on “Interesting blog PR insight from political side of the fence

  1. Obvious questions:

    How is the grassroots, “outside of the beltway” campaign working out for Edwards? Seems rather poorly executed and heay handed (without een considering other candidates)

    “Listen to advice when given by someone who you want to hire anyway”

    who are you referring to as the advice-giver here, the person in the article or yourself? seems equally needed.

    Questions driven by recent questionable ethics calls n your part:

    you should warn people that you have to click on sponsored link to read the article or provide a more direct link if you can…though it wouldn’t surprise me if Podtech got a piece of that click through action. Do they?

    “But, he noted, he hadn’t given up his own blog, and neither had another member of the Edwards Internet team.”

    Would that be you?

  2. Obvious questions:

    How is the grassroots, “outside of the beltway” campaign working out for Edwards? Seems rather poorly executed and heay handed (without een considering other candidates)

    “Listen to advice when given by someone who you want to hire anyway”

    who are you referring to as the advice-giver here, the person in the article or yourself? seems equally needed.

    Questions driven by recent questionable ethics calls n your part:

    you should warn people that you have to click on sponsored link to read the article or provide a more direct link if you can…though it wouldn’t surprise me if Podtech got a piece of that click through action. Do they?

    “But, he noted, he hadn’t given up his own blog, and neither had another member of the Edwards Internet team.”

    Would that be you?

  3. Mate, what is this shit spam or something. I thought it would be in depth political analysis of how the liberals f’d up by putting wacky left wing shit out there in the last presidential election when all they had to do was say get the f out of iraq, instead all I get is an add.

    What’s going on????

    Good point though about corporations listening to those who actually deal with the people at the ground.

  4. Mate, what is this shit spam or something. I thought it would be in depth political analysis of how the liberals f’d up by putting wacky left wing shit out there in the last presidential election when all they had to do was say get the f out of iraq, instead all I get is an add.

    What’s going on????

    Good point though about corporations listening to those who actually deal with the people at the ground.

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