Steve Jobs alert: Killer Java app for iPhone

Steve Jobs doesn’t think there’s anything cool being done in Java. At least that’s what he told Sun Microsystems’ CEO Jonathan Schwartz.

If I were Jonathan I’d pay John Poisson, CEO of Tiny Pictures to head over to Steve Jobs’ office and show him Radar.

This turns your camera phone into a social tool for sending fun stuff to your family. I got a demo a little while ago and it rocks.

Radar is sort of like Twitter (and we saw how popular that got in the past few weeks) but even better: it’s small photos for your friends. It’s getting very popular and I want it. But, the problem is I’m getting an iPhone and the iPhone doesn’t yet have a Java runtime (which Radar needs for its full-featured client — a lower quality WAP client is available, but it isn’t nearly as cool or useful).

Anyway, I’m noticing a trend here. The coolest stuff to come before my camera lately has been for mobile phones.

Maybe instead of Web 2.0 we should be talking about Mobile 2.0.

83 thoughts on “Steve Jobs alert: Killer Java app for iPhone

  1. Steve Jobs, I believe wants to follow his philosophy of design. He doesnt want the apps looking like any other computer and mobile app, he wants his own, and why not refuse Java its everywhere and its appearance/performance aint the best. I dont trust Java, its performance is slow, and appearance seems like its the first gui os, i remember getting one of the first phones that supported java and thought, wow they downgraded.

    I reckon its the best idea not including java, it forces something new to be done, or simply more secure closed programming, and hopefully no viruses and glitches.

    Having open technology is a bad option and should be strictly for developers only. Why? might you ask.

    I’ll tell you why, actually no you can realise it.
    Think of how many hours you’ve used (wasted) tring to make your computer better and looking for software?

    If you say lots your obviosly a windows/linux user, like me.

    I want to convert to mac but dont have the money. I realise I spend more time working then fixing(tweaking,adding,removing) on a mac

    and with hardware being more expensive it forces you to conform and just get back to using time wisely.

    and for all the one button mouse haters, just plug a normal mouse in it will work just like it did on any other PC. (so many people i know dont realise)

  2. Steve Jobs, I believe wants to follow his philosophy of design. He doesnt want the apps looking like any other computer and mobile app, he wants his own, and why not refuse Java its everywhere and its appearance/performance aint the best. I dont trust Java, its performance is slow, and appearance seems like its the first gui os, i remember getting one of the first phones that supported java and thought, wow they downgraded.

    I reckon its the best idea not including java, it forces something new to be done, or simply more secure closed programming, and hopefully no viruses and glitches.

    Having open technology is a bad option and should be strictly for developers only. Why? might you ask.

    I’ll tell you why, actually no you can realise it.
    Think of how many hours you’ve used (wasted) tring to make your computer better and looking for software?

    If you say lots your obviosly a windows/linux user, like me.

    I want to convert to mac but dont have the money. I realise I spend more time working then fixing(tweaking,adding,removing) on a mac

    and with hardware being more expensive it forces you to conform and just get back to using time wisely.

    and for all the one button mouse haters, just plug a normal mouse in it will work just like it did on any other PC. (so many people i know dont realise)

  3. The problem with Java as Apple sees it, is that it is an open cross platform technology with standardarized specifications and API’s. Java would hurt iPhone’s proprietary nature by making mobile applications portable to other mobile devices. The rest of the arguments are BS. MS and Apple will always fight technology that hurts the proprietary nature of their systems.

  4. The problem with Java as Apple sees it, is that it is an open cross platform technology with standardarized specifications and API’s. Java would hurt iPhone’s proprietary nature by making mobile applications portable to other mobile devices. The rest of the arguments are BS. MS and Apple will always fight technology that hurts the proprietary nature of their systems.

  5. I have to agree with asj. The closed system of the iPhone is going to keep it from competition with other “smart phones.” I guess when their target audience is identical to the current iPod users, they just want an iPod with more features so it’s not a “phone with a lot of features” but an “iPod with a lot of features.”

    http://nationwidevpn.com

  6. I have to agree with asj. The closed system of the iPhone is going to keep it from competition with other “smart phones.” I guess when their target audience is identical to the current iPod users, they just want an iPod with more features so it’s not a “phone with a lot of features” but an “iPod with a lot of features.”

    http://nationwidevpn.com

  7. No Java? Then no Gmail Mobile app. No Google Maps Mobile. No skype apps. No Opera Mini browser. None of the thousands and thousands of games like Darkest Fear.

    Funny, reminds me of when Windows Mobile users where desperately scrounging around for a way to update the VM on their phones because they wanted to download Java apps.

    Stevie, the iPhone is not going to fly yoo far as a CLOSED system in a highly competitive, open world.

    Btw, what’s even funnier is that a cousin of MIDP in the CDC profile, BD-Java, is going to be powering Pixar films like Cars in Blu-ray discs ;-)

    http://www.blueboard.com/bluray/

  8. No Java? Then no Gmail Mobile app. No Google Maps Mobile. No skype apps. No Opera Mini browser. None of the thousands and thousands of games like Darkest Fear.

    Funny, reminds me of when Windows Mobile users where desperately scrounging around for a way to update the VM on their phones because they wanted to download Java apps.

    Stevie, the iPhone is not going to fly yoo far as a CLOSED system in a highly competitive, open world.

    Btw, what’s even funnier is that a cousin of MIDP in the CDC profile, BD-Java, is going to be powering Pixar films like Cars in Blu-ray discs ;-)

    http://www.blueboard.com/bluray/

  9. Boris said:

    “And it is further clear that Apple is not interested in, or simply does not see, in allowing their market base to invest some of it’s time to make their product really shine.”

    And, I laughed. Why is it that every third rate programmer in the country thinks he can write better applications for the iPhone than Apple’s inhouse developers and its partners can? I’ll answer that. The A word — arrogance. I, for one, do not consider arrogance a guarantee of ability. I suspect Steve Jobs doesn’t either.

    Rob, I think many early adopters awful experience with mobile Java on PDAs permanently alienated us. We are NOT crying copious tears over not having J2ME apps on our mobile phones.

  10. Boris said:

    “And it is further clear that Apple is not interested in, or simply does not see, in allowing their market base to invest some of it’s time to make their product really shine.”

    And, I laughed. Why is it that every third rate programmer in the country thinks he can write better applications for the iPhone than Apple’s inhouse developers and its partners can? I’ll answer that. The A word — arrogance. I, for one, do not consider arrogance a guarantee of ability. I suspect Steve Jobs doesn’t either.

    Rob, I think many early adopters awful experience with mobile Java on PDAs permanently alienated us. We are NOT crying copious tears over not having J2ME apps on our mobile phones.

  11. The truth is that Java on mobile is the only economical way of building applications for mobile phones that will work on a large number of different mobile phone devices on the market. It is phone’s like the coming iPhone, Windows Mobile, Palm Treo and some very proprietary phones by Motorola, LG, Samsung and Sony that make up the 20% of the phone market that break the bank for application developers.

    I am with Melodeo Mobilcast that is working to port podcasts to mobile phones all over the world and the missing support for java forces us to spend thousands of wasted dollars building device specific versions of our Mobilcast application.

    The mobile industry just needs to make Java standard on all phones.

    Mobilcast is available to be installed outside of most of the carrier networks with our Mobilcast v5 beta. http://mobilcast.com/mobile_center

    The only carrier that will absolutly not run Mobilcast is Verizon here in the USA.

  12. The truth is that Java on mobile is the only economical way of building applications for mobile phones that will work on a large number of different mobile phone devices on the market. It is phone’s like the coming iPhone, Windows Mobile, Palm Treo and some very proprietary phones by Motorola, LG, Samsung and Sony that make up the 20% of the phone market that break the bank for application developers.

    I am with Melodeo Mobilcast that is working to port podcasts to mobile phones all over the world and the missing support for java forces us to spend thousands of wasted dollars building device specific versions of our Mobilcast application.

    The mobile industry just needs to make Java standard on all phones.

    Mobilcast is available to be installed outside of most of the carrier networks with our Mobilcast v5 beta. http://mobilcast.com/mobile_center

    The only carrier that will absolutly not run Mobilcast is Verizon here in the USA.

  13. Hey Boris,
    After re-reading Xapplimatic’s comment for what you thought you read, I did not see anywhere he says they are not possible. He stated the iPhone is not going to be open and that other phones aren’t either….

  14. Hey Boris,
    After re-reading Xapplimatic’s comment for what you thought you read, I did not see anywhere he says they are not possible. He stated the iPhone is not going to be open and that other phones aren’t either….

  15. Had a quick look at Radar. Not a ‘killer app’ for me as the whole social networking thing has passed me by.

    I tell you what is for me: Gmail and Sky by Mobile. In the UK, I can access a Java app on my SE K800i, browse the whole Sky TV guide and get my Sky HD box to record stuff remotely. Sometimes I don’t know how I live without it.

  16. Had a quick look at Radar. Not a ‘killer app’ for me as the whole social networking thing has passed me by.

    I tell you what is for me: Gmail and Sky by Mobile. In the UK, I can access a Java app on my SE K800i, browse the whole Sky TV guide and get my Sky HD box to record stuff remotely. Sometimes I don’t know how I live without it.

  17. Radar seems to be cool but do we need Java for it? Do Google Maps need Java on the iPhone? When Radar will become great we will get is on the iPhone but not programmed in Java.

  18. Radar seems to be cool but do we need Java for it? Do Google Maps need Java on the iPhone? When Radar will become great we will get is on the iPhone but not programmed in Java.

  19. Xapplimatic: I suggest you research a bit more before you run at the mouth, because you evidently haven’t the slightest clue. :)
    There are tons of applications, written by everyday individuals, available for download and use on mobile devices (cellphone? what’s that? something your grandma uses?). Some even for free. Yes most platforms are closed, and yes lots of the really cool stuff is somehow blocked off, be it at the hardware, platform or network layer, but they DO exist and ARE possible.

    Anyone who knows how can write a J2ME app that can run on a wide range of devices. That’s a fact which somehow escaped your thorough research apparently. ;)

  20. Xapplimatic: I suggest you research a bit more before you run at the mouth, because you evidently haven’t the slightest clue. :)
    There are tons of applications, written by everyday individuals, available for download and use on mobile devices (cellphone? what’s that? something your grandma uses?). Some even for free. Yes most platforms are closed, and yes lots of the really cool stuff is somehow blocked off, be it at the hardware, platform or network layer, but they DO exist and ARE possible.

    Anyone who knows how can write a J2ME app that can run on a wide range of devices. That’s a fact which somehow escaped your thorough research apparently. ;)

  21. Excuse me, but there are NO OPEN CELL PHONES on the market today.. so why should the iPhone be? Don’t tell me there are! There aren’t. Every one of them requires you to download and pay for apps through their exclusive service.. You can’t just download them over a USB cable.. and you can’t save them or retransmit them to a new phone when you upgrade. They force you to pay for them again. How is that open? Why should iPhone work any differently from the competitors? As usual, people have unusually high expectations of Apple.. so much so that they don’t even reality check what exists today when they debate about how what Apple makes should be working tomorrow morning.. !

Comments are closed.