Newspapers are dead…

On November 18, 2005, I told San Jose State’s Journalism school that my son would never subscribe to, nor read, a newspaper.

I thoroughly believe that. I’ve seen the future of newspapers (and really all printed content) and it isn’t print. Let’s talk more this summer after I can show it  to you.

I told the faculty there that deep changes must be made. They haven’t yet listened (although they added one podcasting class that is pretty popular now).

Today I read all over the blogs (thanks Tim O’Reilly and Dave Winer) that the San Francisco Chronicle is rumored to be in deep financial pain.

The industry has NOT invested in its future. It is reaping the rewards of that.

How many future journalists are being trained for the online world?

I can tell you how many: zero.

When I talked with students back then about half thought they were going to work in newspapers.

I told them they were smoking crack.

The journalism industry needs to implement major, wholesale, changes. Start by reading Dave Winer’s suggestions.

What would you do if you ran a journalism school? Or, were an executive at a newspaper?

Both Bay Area major newspapers have been laying journalists off in droves. It’s so sad, but it was something that we could see coming for quite a while. The trend will continue.

184 thoughts on “Newspapers are dead…

  1. 2 years after this post interesting to see how rapided the change will come in newspapers with the God father of newspapers Mr Rupert Murdock now saying newspapers will all go digital in next 10 to 15 years, we would say less then 5 years that will take place

  2. 2 years after this post interesting to see how rapided the change will come in newspapers with the God father of newspapers Mr Rupert Murdock now saying newspapers will all go digital in next 10 to 15 years, we would say less then 5 years that will take place

  3. Contact Your Elected Officials such as President, Vice-President, US Representatives, US Senators, State Senator. Use Free Political Absentee Ballot Application, Voter Registration Application and Polling Place Locator tools

  4. Contact Your Elected Officials such as President, Vice-President, US Representatives, US Senators, State Senator. Use Free Political Absentee Ballot Application, Voter Registration Application and Polling Place Locator tools

  5. Shukoor Ahmed ran for a seat in the Maryland House of Delegates in 1998, after coming to America a decade earlier from Hyderabad, India. Campaigning door-to-door, he was surprised so many voters did not know who represented them! After his race ended slightly short of victory, he took advantage of his Master’s degree in Computer Technology and Political Science to build StateDemocracy.org, a website he launched in 2001 to connect citizens and lawmakers. His website’s motto encapsulated its mission

  6. Shukoor Ahmed ran for a seat in the Maryland House of Delegates in 1998, after coming to America a decade earlier from Hyderabad, India. Campaigning door-to-door, he was surprised so many voters did not know who represented them! After his race ended slightly short of victory, he took advantage of his Master’s degree in Computer Technology and Political Science to build StateDemocracy.org, a website he launched in 2001 to connect citizens and lawmakers. His website’s motto encapsulated its mission

  7. News papers are following emerging trend in order to increase their circulations and also maximizing revenue. Most of the publishers are using the services like http://www.pressmart.net to digitize their print publications. Through digitization, publishers can publish in online, RSS syndication, pod casting, etc.

  8. News papers are following emerging trend in order to increase their circulations and also maximizing revenue. Most of the publishers are using the services like http://www.pressmart.net to digitize their print publications. Through digitization, publishers can publish in online, RSS syndication, pod casting, etc.

  9. It must be comforting to pontificate from the mountain top when lesser humans live below. Many of your statements are “shoot from the hip” diatribes against journalism schools and newspapers. Yet you would never have acquired the content to write you early blog posts without traditional news media. Like the moguls in broadcasting and cable, who predicted the demise of the printed word, you speak without any reference to history or any definitive studies that prove your case. Newspapers, magazines and other print media are not dead, nor are they dying. They’re transitioning into a new age of collaboration between electronic and printed media. Rod Steiger of the Wall Street Journal recently wrote an article that covers the rise and fall of newspapers, but he does it with fact and reason. I suggest you read it.

  10. It must be comforting to pontificate from the mountain top when lesser humans live below. Many of your statements are “shoot from the hip” diatribes against journalism schools and newspapers. Yet you would never have acquired the content to write you early blog posts without traditional news media. Like the moguls in broadcasting and cable, who predicted the demise of the printed word, you speak without any reference to history or any definitive studies that prove your case. Newspapers, magazines and other print media are not dead, nor are they dying. They’re transitioning into a new age of collaboration between electronic and printed media. Rod Steiger of the Wall Street Journal recently wrote an article that covers the rise and fall of newspapers, but he does it with fact and reason. I suggest you read it.

  11. Wow, you are totally clueless about how this? Just because your reading habits are limited to 2 lines of poorly constructed prose — which you call “journalism,” well, excuuuuuuuse me. Then again, you’re just a lamo coder. Please leave the social philosophizing to somebody who actually knows something.

  12. Wow, you are totally clueless about how this? Just because your reading habits are limited to 2 lines of poorly constructed prose — which you call “journalism,” well, excuuuuuuuse me. Then again, you’re just a lamo coder. Please leave the social philosophizing to somebody who actually knows something.

  13. The wisdom of writers on publishing

    http://kentsimperative.blogspot.com/2007/03/wisdom-of-writers-on-publishing.html

    ….we think we need to defense to support our contention that one should always watch the leading edge of those who make their living solely by the public sale of the written word as a bellwether for all who work in information industries. After all, the publishing sector is among the oldest of all such endeavors, and the changes wrought by the digital era that impact us all are felt most keenly there…..

  14. The wisdom of writers on publishing

    http://kentsimperative.blogspot.com/2007/03/wisdom-of-writers-on-publishing.html

    ….we think we need to defense to support our contention that one should always watch the leading edge of those who make their living solely by the public sale of the written word as a bellwether for all who work in information industries. After all, the publishing sector is among the oldest of all such endeavors, and the changes wrought by the digital era that impact us all are felt most keenly there…..

  15. As a long-ago J-school grad of SJSU, it seems to me that 99 percent of what I learned there – long before the Internet – is utterly transferable to the Net. The mechanics of getting the news in front of people is a peripheral issue. Learning how to dig for a story and write an honest story is what is invaluable about J school. And in that realm, the established media have it all over bloggers in getting the story.

    If newspapers concentrate on doing that right, they have a good future. If they decide to make their newswriters into editorialists, they are wasting and devaluing their main asset.

    Bloggers are mostly linkers and editorial writers. What do they link to and editorialize about? Generally stories from the mainline media, and that’s where the mainline media shines … or, at least, can shine.

    I think newspapers can make the transition to the Net – though it’s going to hurt – if they go back to writing fair, evenhanded, fact-supported articles. While I think some critics go overboard in attacking the evenhandedness of the mainstream media, they have no lack of examples when they shout, “Bias!”

  16. As a long-ago J-school grad of SJSU, it seems to me that 99 percent of what I learned there – long before the Internet – is utterly transferable to the Net. The mechanics of getting the news in front of people is a peripheral issue. Learning how to dig for a story and write an honest story is what is invaluable about J school. And in that realm, the established media have it all over bloggers in getting the story.

    If newspapers concentrate on doing that right, they have a good future. If they decide to make their newswriters into editorialists, they are wasting and devaluing their main asset.

    Bloggers are mostly linkers and editorial writers. What do they link to and editorialize about? Generally stories from the mainline media, and that’s where the mainline media shines … or, at least, can shine.

    I think newspapers can make the transition to the Net – though it’s going to hurt – if they go back to writing fair, evenhanded, fact-supported articles. While I think some critics go overboard in attacking the evenhandedness of the mainstream media, they have no lack of examples when they shout, “Bias!”

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