Taking the week off

I’m physically ill after reading what happened to Kathy Sierra. Maryam and several others here at PodTech asked me about it and are concerned since the same sites that are attacking Kathy also mentioned me and Maryam. Maryam is really freaked out about it. So am I.

She doesn’t feel safe. I don’t either after reading Kathy’s post. I, like Mike Arrington and other bloggers, have gotten threatened and I’ve just ignored it. It comes with the territory, or so they say. But what Kathy is going through is just totally disgusting. I note that only one of the four that Kathy specifically mention has apologized. That itself is disgusting. Those people are NOT my friends and I don’t support that kind of blogging or commenting and remove such attacks if left here against other people (I leave attacks against me up, but that’s cause generally most people here are pretty cool, even if they think I’m a jerk).

We’re putting ourselves out there in ways very few people do. We should be safe from death threats and other sexual attacks and stuff, especially from other bloggers.

So, since she doesn’t feel safe. I’m going to stop blogging in support of Kathy, who I consider a friend and someone who’s voice would be dearly missed here. I’ll be back Monday.

The Internet culture is really disgusting. Today when I was on Justin.TV the kinds of things that people were discussing in the chat room there were just totally disgusting and over the top.

We have to fix this culture. For the next week, let’s discuss how.

And, Kathy, Maryam and I love you and are there for you. Don’t let these jerks get you down.

It’s this culture of attacking women that has especially got to stop. I really don’t care if you attack me. I take those attacks in stride. But, whenever I post a video of a female technologist there invariably are snide remarks about body parts and other things that simply wouldn’t happen if the interviewee were a man.

It makes me realize just how ascerbic this industry and culture are toward women. This just makes me ill.

796 thoughts on “Taking the week off

  1. I’ve been thinking about what should happen next.

    Tim O’Reilly is setting out some ideas from ETech in
    http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2007/03/call_for_a_blog_1.html

    There’s some useful feedback there, particularly from the lady who manages THE WELL, the place that Chris Locke got the ‘You Own You Own Words’ mantra from. She’s concerned about the use the phrase has been put to in this case. Sounds like it should mean pretty much the opposite of how it’s been taken so far.

    I’ve also been thinking about Ron Elizondo’s useful proposal (108) of a standard graphic for ‘Zero Violence Blog’.

    http://brandcurve.com/zero-violence-blog/

    But for various reasons that phrase doesn’t seem to me to give the right feel. It calls to mind this much more radical and populist slogan:

    ‘Zero Tolerance Internet’

    ‘Zero Tolerance’ because of what that has come to mean in the popular mind through the reforms in New York City and now I guess other places. (At least, I lived and worked in NYC in 95, before that initiative, visiting friends in the darker streets of Brooklyn, and was back last year. Everything I see and hear tells me there’s been a change for good there. But please enlighten me on the allusions, stateside.)

    Internet, rather than Blog or Web because it was the combination of deadly anonymous emails and evil blog postings that freaked Kathy (and, to a lesser extent, freaked me six years ago). This should be fully born in in mind before she is criticized for going over the top in naming famous names who at the very least didn’t stop the rot. It isn’t easy to think clearly if you’re the victim of a unknown, but for all you know multi-person, multi-media attack like this, with the evidence being taken down before you even have a chance to take copies, in your initial shock.

    Saying ‘Zero Tolerance Internet’ on the front or margin of one’s blog or website can of course never be fully actualized, just as No Spam will always be a chimera, in the cold light of day. But those of us who’ve moved from hotmail to gmail know how much more pleasant life can be like with a decent spam filter. If we were to define Zero Tolerance Internet right and then many millions of websites displayed the logo that could I’m sure make a major difference.

    So how am I defining ‘Zero Tolernace’? I’m not. I think it’s a job for a select committee, as they say in the UK Parliament. But that committee should contain at least as many women as men, at least as many people who’ve suffered grievously from such persecution on the net as those that haven’t. Plus some good, techno-blog brains, plus some voices who are not from a technical background at all.

    Once the select committee reports its proposal (and the proposal can be developed in goldfish bowl style if everyone’s happy with that) the blogosphere as a whole can have its say, considered real names of good repute joining with anonymous ranters. All the normal sort of thing.

    But the balance of the original group is I think the key. I will email a few people some ideas on that later today.

  2. I’ve been thinking about what should happen next.

    Tim O’Reilly is setting out some ideas from ETech in
    http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2007/03/call_for_a_blog_1.html

    There’s some useful feedback there, particularly from the lady who manages THE WELL, the place that Chris Locke got the ‘You Own You Own Words’ mantra from. She’s concerned about the use the phrase has been put to in this case. Sounds like it should mean pretty much the opposite of how it’s been taken so far.

    I’ve also been thinking about Ron Elizondo’s useful proposal (108) of a standard graphic for ‘Zero Violence Blog’.

    http://brandcurve.com/zero-violence-blog/

    But for various reasons that phrase doesn’t seem to me to give the right feel. It calls to mind this much more radical and populist slogan:

    ‘Zero Tolerance Internet’

    ‘Zero Tolerance’ because of what that has come to mean in the popular mind through the reforms in New York City and now I guess other places. (At least, I lived and worked in NYC in 95, before that initiative, visiting friends in the darker streets of Brooklyn, and was back last year. Everything I see and hear tells me there’s been a change for good there. But please enlighten me on the allusions, stateside.)

    Internet, rather than Blog or Web because it was the combination of deadly anonymous emails and evil blog postings that freaked Kathy (and, to a lesser extent, freaked me six years ago). This should be fully born in in mind before she is criticized for going over the top in naming famous names who at the very least didn’t stop the rot. It isn’t easy to think clearly if you’re the victim of a unknown, but for all you know multi-person, multi-media attack like this, with the evidence being taken down before you even have a chance to take copies, in your initial shock.

    Saying ‘Zero Tolerance Internet’ on the front or margin of one’s blog or website can of course never be fully actualized, just as No Spam will always be a chimera, in the cold light of day. But those of us who’ve moved from hotmail to gmail know how much more pleasant life can be like with a decent spam filter. If we were to define Zero Tolerance Internet right and then many millions of websites displayed the logo that could I’m sure make a major difference.

    So how am I defining ‘Zero Tolernace’? I’m not. I think it’s a job for a select committee, as they say in the UK Parliament. But that committee should contain at least as many women as men, at least as many people who’ve suffered grievously from such persecution on the net as those that haven’t. Plus some good, techno-blog brains, plus some voices who are not from a technical background at all.

    Once the select committee reports its proposal (and the proposal can be developed in goldfish bowl style if everyone’s happy with that) the blogosphere as a whole can have its say, considered real names of good repute joining with anonymous ranters. All the normal sort of thing.

    But the balance of the original group is I think the key. I will email a few people some ideas on that later today.

  3. I’ve been thinking about what should happen next.

    Tim O’Reilly is setting out some ideas from ETech in
    http://radar.oreilly.com/archives/2007/03/call_for_a_blog_1.html

    There’s some useful feedback there, particularly from the lady who manages THE WELL, the place that Chris Locke got the ‘You Own You Own Words’ mantra from. She’s concerned about the use the phrase has been put to in this case. Sounds like it should mean pretty much the opposite of how it’s been taken so far.

    I’ve also been thinking about Ron Elizondo’s useful proposal (108) of a standard graphic for ‘Zero Violence Blog’.

    http://brandcurve.com/zero-violence-blog/

    But for various reasons that phrase doesn’t seem to me to give the right feel. It calls to mind this much more radical and populist slogan:

    ‘Zero Tolerance Internet’

    ‘Zero Tolerance’ because of what that has come to mean in the popular mind through the reforms in New York City and now I guess other places. (At least, I lived and worked in NYC in 95, before that initiative, visiting friends in the darker streets of Brooklyn, and was back last year. Everything I see and hear tells me there’s been a change for good there. But please enlighten me on the allusions, stateside.)

    Internet, rather than Blog or Web because it was the combination of deadly anonymous emails and evil blog postings that freaked Kathy (and, to a lesser extent, freaked me six years ago). This should be fully born in in mind before she is criticized for going over the top in naming famous names who at the very least didn’t stop the rot. It isn’t easy to think clearly if you’re the victim of a unknown, but for all you know multi-person, multi-media attack like this, with the evidence being taken down before you even have a chance to take copies, in your initial shock.

    Saying ‘Zero Tolerance Internet’ on the front or margin of one’s blog or website can of course never be fully actualized, just as No Spam will always be a chimera, in the cold light of day. But those of us who’ve moved from hotmail to gmail know how much more pleasant life can be like with a decent spam filter. If we were to define Zero Tolerance Internet right and then many millions of websites displayed the logo that could I’m sure make a major difference.

    So how am I defining ‘Zero Tolernace’? I’m not. I think it’s a job for a select committee, as they say in the UK Parliament. But that committee should contain at least as many women as men, at least as many people who’ve suffered grievously from such persecution on the net as those that haven’t. Plus some good, techno-blog brains, plus some voices who are not from a technical background at all.

    Once the select committee reports its proposal (and the proposal can be developed in goldfish bowl style if everyone’s happy with that) the blogosphere as a whole can have its say, considered real names of good repute joining with anonymous ranters. All the normal sort of thing.

    But the balance of the original group is I think the key. I will email a few people some ideas on that later today.

  4. David(430): “It does, however, raise an interesting jurisdiction question if someone from a country other than the US is making these death threats.”

    That was my point. I’m in the UK. Although the origigal threats aren’t funny, the thought of a angry vigilante mob trying to expel a miscreant from the USA when they’d never been there in the first place seemed faintly amusing.

    I’m not into any change of law, anywhere, to deal with this case or ones like it. From what I can tell, nor is Kathy, nor is Scoble. I do think the issue of net culture is worth discussion, as they and many others clearly do. And to discuss it, it’s worth remembering the international dimension. (And, unfashionable though it may be to say over here, sincere thanks to the US for making such a wonderful tool as the internet available to the world; thanks to my fellow Brit Tim Berners-Lee for his part also.)

  5. David(430): “It does, however, raise an interesting jurisdiction question if someone from a country other than the US is making these death threats.”

    That was my point. I’m in the UK. Although the origigal threats aren’t funny, the thought of a angry vigilante mob trying to expel a miscreant from the USA when they’d never been there in the first place seemed faintly amusing.

    I’m not into any change of law, anywhere, to deal with this case or ones like it. From what I can tell, nor is Kathy, nor is Scoble. I do think the issue of net culture is worth discussion, as they and many others clearly do. And to discuss it, it’s worth remembering the international dimension. (And, unfashionable though it may be to say over here, sincere thanks to the US for making such a wonderful tool as the internet available to the world; thanks to my fellow Brit Tim Berners-Lee for his part also.)

  6. David(430): “It does, however, raise an interesting jurisdiction question if someone from a country other than the US is making these death threats.”

    That was my point. I’m in the UK. Although the origigal threats aren’t funny, the thought of a angry vigilante mob trying to expel a miscreant from the USA when they’d never been there in the first place seemed faintly amusing.

    I’m not into any change of law, anywhere, to deal with this case or ones like it. From what I can tell, nor is Kathy, nor is Scoble. I do think the issue of net culture is worth discussion, as they and many others clearly do. And to discuss it, it’s worth remembering the international dimension. (And, unfashionable though it may be to say over here, sincere thanks to the US for making such a wonderful tool as the internet available to the world; thanks to my fellow Brit Tim Berners-Lee for his part also.)

  7. @400 “Now, the first amendment to which constitution is that, remind me? While we’re at it, which Congress? And the laws of every state of which federal system?”

    I didn’t realize the point was that obtuse.
    I believe Mr. Gannotti was referring to laws in the Unites States of America. I also referred to the US Constitition (I believe that was rather obvious) since I believe the alleged acts committed against Ms. Sierra were committed against her while in the U.S. So, U.S. laws would apply. If I’m to infer correctly from your comment, perhaps you are suggesting some “laws” that would reach beyond borders? Good luck with that. If a crime is committed within the borders of a country, then I’m guessing the law of said country apply. In the US it’s still not a crime to be a jerk. Which is what is basically going on when they types of comment are made. It does, however, raise an intereting juritiction question if someone from a country other than the US is making these death threats.

  8. @400 “Now, the first amendment to which constitution is that, remind me? While we’re at it, which Congress? And the laws of every state of which federal system?”

    I didn’t realize the point was that obtuse.
    I believe Mr. Gannotti was referring to laws in the Unites States of America. I also referred to the US Constitition (I believe that was rather obvious) since I believe the alleged acts committed against Ms. Sierra were committed against her while in the U.S. So, U.S. laws would apply. If I’m to infer correctly from your comment, perhaps you are suggesting some “laws” that would reach beyond borders? Good luck with that. If a crime is committed within the borders of a country, then I’m guessing the law of said country apply. In the US it’s still not a crime to be a jerk. Which is what is basically going on when they types of comment are made. It does, however, raise an intereting juritiction question if someone from a country other than the US is making these death threats.

  9. @400 “Now, the first amendment to which constitution is that, remind me? While we’re at it, which Congress? And the laws of every state of which federal system?”

    I didn’t realize the point was that obtuse.
    I believe Mr. Gannotti was referring to laws in the Unites States of America. I also referred to the US Constitition (I believe that was rather obvious) since I believe the alleged acts committed against Ms. Sierra were committed against her while in the U.S. So, U.S. laws would apply. If I’m to infer correctly from your comment, perhaps you are suggesting some “laws” that would reach beyond borders? Good luck with that. If a crime is committed within the borders of a country, then I’m guessing the law of said country apply. In the US it’s still not a crime to be a jerk. Which is what is basically going on when they types of comment are made. It does, however, raise an intereting juritiction question if someone from a country other than the US is making these death threats.

  10. Re: 396, 397, 398.

    Howdy you’ll!

    ‘ … when that crosses the line into death threats, I think we already have laws in every state that makes that illegal. … The First Amendment … does say: “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech”.’

    Now, the first amendment to which constitution is that, remind me? While we’re at it, which Congress? And the laws of every state of which federal system?

    ‘ … find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”’

    Ah, that might be a clue.

    ‘ … why stop there. Why not picket their homes? Don’t wait for them to leave, DRIVE THEM OUT.’

    Indeed. But one level of irony was missed. What say — and I know this is going to come as a shock to some readers — that the person(s) concerned were editing from another country than America. You never know, it may just have happened. Even just once.

    In fact, unless my eyes deceive me, twittervision yesterday suggested quite a few countries could be involved in the problem.

    Not just the problem, as that cool experience reminded me, Robert Scoble included. A great deal of the joy and illumination of the Internet comes from this international aspect. Isn’t that part of the good we’re trying to protect, as we express solidarity with Kathy here?

  11. Re: 396, 397, 398.

    Howdy you’ll!

    ‘ … when that crosses the line into death threats, I think we already have laws in every state that makes that illegal. … The First Amendment … does say: “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech”.’

    Now, the first amendment to which constitution is that, remind me? While we’re at it, which Congress? And the laws of every state of which federal system?

    ‘ … find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”’

    Ah, that might be a clue.

    ‘ … why stop there. Why not picket their homes? Don’t wait for them to leave, DRIVE THEM OUT.’

    Indeed. But one level of irony was missed. What say — and I know this is going to come as a shock to some readers — that the person(s) concerned were editing from another country than America. You never know, it may just have happened. Even just once.

    In fact, unless my eyes deceive me, twittervision yesterday suggested quite a few countries could be involved in the problem.

    Not just the problem, as that cool experience reminded me, Robert Scoble included. A great deal of the joy and illumination of the Internet comes from this international aspect. Isn’t that part of the good we’re trying to protect, as we express solidarity with Kathy here?

  12. Re: 396, 397, 398.

    Howdy you’ll!

    ‘ … when that crosses the line into death threats, I think we already have laws in every state that makes that illegal. … The First Amendment … does say: “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech”.’

    Now, the first amendment to which constitution is that, remind me? While we’re at it, which Congress? And the laws of every state of which federal system?

    ‘ … find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”’

    Ah, that might be a clue.

    ‘ … why stop there. Why not picket their homes? Don’t wait for them to leave, DRIVE THEM OUT.’

    Indeed. But one level of irony was missed. What say — and I know this is going to come as a shock to some readers — that the person(s) concerned were editing from another country than America. You never know, it may just have happened. Even just once.

    In fact, unless my eyes deceive me, twittervision yesterday suggested quite a few countries could be involved in the problem.

    Not just the problem, as that cool experience reminded me, Robert Scoble included. A great deal of the joy and illumination of the Internet comes from this international aspect. Isn’t that part of the good we’re trying to protect, as we express solidarity with Kathy here?

  13. (piano pianissimo…poco a poco cresc)
    Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens
    Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens
    Brown paper packages tied up with strings
    These are a few of my favorite things

    (crescendo…forte)
    When the dog bites
    When the bee stings
    When I’m feeling sad
    I simply remember my favorite things
    And then I don’t feel so bad
    (forte fortissimo)

    Don’t make us lose what we love… Our passion about Technology.

    We will stand against Evil. Love will overcome Hate. Passion will overcome Fear.

    (Javascript to shower a lot of love down on the screen…)

  14. (piano pianissimo…poco a poco cresc)
    Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens
    Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens
    Brown paper packages tied up with strings
    These are a few of my favorite things

    (crescendo…forte)
    When the dog bites
    When the bee stings
    When I’m feeling sad
    I simply remember my favorite things
    And then I don’t feel so bad
    (forte fortissimo)

    Don’t make us lose what we love… Our passion about Technology.

    We will stand against Evil. Love will overcome Hate. Passion will overcome Fear.

    (Javascript to shower a lot of love down on the screen…)

  15. (piano pianissimo…poco a poco cresc)
    Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens
    Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens
    Brown paper packages tied up with strings
    These are a few of my favorite things

    (crescendo…forte)
    When the dog bites
    When the bee stings
    When I’m feeling sad
    I simply remember my favorite things
    And then I don’t feel so bad
    (forte fortissimo)

    Don’t make us lose what we love… Our passion about Technology.

    We will stand against Evil. Love will overcome Hate. Passion will overcome Fear.

    (Javascript to shower a lot of love down on the screen…)

  16. A cool thing would be to find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”. Include on the site instructions for these people to use to defect to ……how about Iraq?

    Why stop there? Since this is nothing more than a call to a virtual lynch mob, (and wasn’t that what people are all upset about since that’s kind of what happened to Kathy?), why stop there. Why not picket their homes? Don’t wait for them to leave, DRIVE THEM OUT.

    Yay mob justice.

  17. A cool thing would be to find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”. Include on the site instructions for these people to use to defect to ……how about Iraq?

    Why stop there? Since this is nothing more than a call to a virtual lynch mob, (and wasn’t that what people are all upset about since that’s kind of what happened to Kathy?), why stop there. Why not picket their homes? Don’t wait for them to leave, DRIVE THEM OUT.

    Yay mob justice.

  18. A cool thing would be to find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”. Include on the site instructions for these people to use to defect to ……how about Iraq?

    Why stop there? Since this is nothing more than a call to a virtual lynch mob, (and wasn’t that what people are all upset about since that’s kind of what happened to Kathy?), why stop there. Why not picket their homes? Don’t wait for them to leave, DRIVE THEM OUT.

    Yay mob justice.

  19. I appreciate you taking a stand on this issue however, I think continuing to blog would make a stronger statement than “going on strike”.

    A cool thing would be to find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”. Include on the site instructions for these people to use to defect to ……how about Iraq?

  20. I appreciate you taking a stand on this issue however, I think continuing to blog would make a stronger statement than “going on strike”.

    A cool thing would be to find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”. Include on the site instructions for these people to use to defect to ……how about Iraq?

  21. I appreciate you taking a stand on this issue however, I think continuing to blog would make a stronger statement than “going on strike”.

    A cool thing would be to find out who did this (legally) and put his/her photo on a blog site titled “America’s Least Wanted”. Include on the site instructions for these people to use to defect to ……how about Iraq?

  22. @384. While an interesting proposal, the last thing I think we need is government involved. What legilation is missing that doesn’t cover this issue? Painful as it is, and it’s certainly inexcusable, you are not guaranteed the right to not be offended by what someone says or writes. It’s not illegal to say something that is offensive. Now when that crosses the line into death threats, I think we already have laws in every state that makes that illegal. And if Ms Sierra really wanted to, she could get law enforcement involved to track down thhe people she feels are doin her harm. So…what more legislation to we need? The First Amendment can certainly make people uncomfortable, but the Amendment does say: “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech”. And, courts have also struck down laws against anonymous speech. I’m not quite sure what role govt has here, then. There are already laws protecting people from death threats. Beyond that, its not illegal to offend people.

  23. @384. While an interesting proposal, the last thing I think we need is government involved. What legilation is missing that doesn’t cover this issue? Painful as it is, and it’s certainly inexcusable, you are not guaranteed the right to not be offended by what someone says or writes. It’s not illegal to say something that is offensive. Now when that crosses the line into death threats, I think we already have laws in every state that makes that illegal. And if Ms Sierra really wanted to, she could get law enforcement involved to track down thhe people she feels are doin her harm. So…what more legislation to we need? The First Amendment can certainly make people uncomfortable, but the Amendment does say: “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech”. And, courts have also struck down laws against anonymous speech. I’m not quite sure what role govt has here, then. There are already laws protecting people from death threats. Beyond that, its not illegal to offend people.

  24. @384. While an interesting proposal, the last thing I think we need is government involved. What legilation is missing that doesn’t cover this issue? Painful as it is, and it’s certainly inexcusable, you are not guaranteed the right to not be offended by what someone says or writes. It’s not illegal to say something that is offensive. Now when that crosses the line into death threats, I think we already have laws in every state that makes that illegal. And if Ms Sierra really wanted to, she could get law enforcement involved to track down thhe people she feels are doin her harm. So…what more legislation to we need? The First Amendment can certainly make people uncomfortable, but the Amendment does say: “Congress shall make no law…abridging the freedom of speech”. And, courts have also struck down laws against anonymous speech. I’m not quite sure what role govt has here, then. There are already laws protecting people from death threats. Beyond that, its not illegal to offend people.

  25. i want to say a big thank you to everyone out there, and especially the guys, who have stood up in this comments section and said that what’s happening with Sierra is not ok.

    it’s true that the internet is littered with horrible crap but there was something about this incident that really turned my stomach and i can totally understand how Sierra would take this differently and fearfully. i was repulsed and depressed by what happened, since i am also a female in sci/tech and let’s face it, we’ve all been faced with this kind of garbage.

    reading the comments section here really made me feel better, and i was heartened to see so many guys including Scoble himself taking a stand and saying we can’t go on allowing attacks on women (or men) in this kind of way. us women need you men to stand by us to be able to fight this. thanks guys!!

  26. i want to say a big thank you to everyone out there, and especially the guys, who have stood up in this comments section and said that what’s happening with Sierra is not ok.

    it’s true that the internet is littered with horrible crap but there was something about this incident that really turned my stomach and i can totally understand how Sierra would take this differently and fearfully. i was repulsed and depressed by what happened, since i am also a female in sci/tech and let’s face it, we’ve all been faced with this kind of garbage.

    reading the comments section here really made me feel better, and i was heartened to see so many guys including Scoble himself taking a stand and saying we can’t go on allowing attacks on women (or men) in this kind of way. us women need you men to stand by us to be able to fight this. thanks guys!!

  27. i want to say a big thank you to everyone out there, and especially the guys, who have stood up in this comments section and said that what’s happening with Sierra is not ok.

    it’s true that the internet is littered with horrible crap but there was something about this incident that really turned my stomach and i can totally understand how Sierra would take this differently and fearfully. i was repulsed and depressed by what happened, since i am also a female in sci/tech and let’s face it, we’ve all been faced with this kind of garbage.

    reading the comments section here really made me feel better, and i was heartened to see so many guys including Scoble himself taking a stand and saying we can’t go on allowing attacks on women (or men) in this kind of way. us women need you men to stand by us to be able to fight this. thanks guys!!

  28. Let’s not forget that incivilities and worse by bloggers are at least as big a problem as incivilities and worse by commenters to blogs. We should be aware that commenter information received by a blog site or multi-user blog platform site may be passed through to the blogger. At wordpress.com, for example, a blog owner sees the IP address presented by a commenter’s visit; if the blog owner has enabled the option of requiring an email address to comment, the email address submittted by the commenter is visible to the blog owner; unfortunately those disclosure facts are not stated in the Privacy Policy.

    There can be some legitimate uses of a commenter’s IP address and email address, but those items of information can be misused. A commenter should decide whether he would be comfortable with a blogger’s receiving those items of information. An ISP email address is more likely to contain information that an unfriendly blogger could exploit than is another email account. Why? The ISP usually already knows an account holder’s name, address, phone number, and some financial information. Many ISP account holders and their family members go ahead and use their regular names, or shortened versions of them, in ISP email addresses, and only give out the addresses to persons or entities that are trusted. In some cases giving such an address to a web platform’s administration might not be particularly disconcerting, but who would want an ISP email address to go to an irate, hateful, or obsessive blogger?

    Requiring ISP email accounts for blogging and for blog commenting would lead to more instances of unwanted personal contacts, more crimes, and more torts. The legal and administrative loads that would fall upon ISPs would be unpleasant for them to contemplate. Any proposal of such a requirement would surely face strong opposition in any legislative body. If passed, such a legal requirement would likely be found unconstitutional.

  29. Let’s not forget that incivilities and worse by bloggers are at least as big a problem as incivilities and worse by commenters to blogs. We should be aware that commenter information received by a blog site or multi-user blog platform site may be passed through to the blogger. At wordpress.com, for example, a blog owner sees the IP address presented by a commenter’s visit; if the blog owner has enabled the option of requiring an email address to comment, the email address submittted by the commenter is visible to the blog owner; unfortunately those disclosure facts are not stated in the Privacy Policy.

    There can be some legitimate uses of a commenter’s IP address and email address, but those items of information can be misused. A commenter should decide whether he would be comfortable with a blogger’s receiving those items of information. An ISP email address is more likely to contain information that an unfriendly blogger could exploit than is another email account. Why? The ISP usually already knows an account holder’s name, address, phone number, and some financial information. Many ISP account holders and their family members go ahead and use their regular names, or shortened versions of them, in ISP email addresses, and only give out the addresses to persons or entities that are trusted. In some cases giving such an address to a web platform’s administration might not be particularly disconcerting, but who would want an ISP email address to go to an irate, hateful, or obsessive blogger?

    Requiring ISP email accounts for blogging and for blog commenting would lead to more instances of unwanted personal contacts, more crimes, and more torts. The legal and administrative loads that would fall upon ISPs would be unpleasant for them to contemplate. Any proposal of such a requirement would surely face strong opposition in any legislative body. If passed, such a legal requirement would likely be found unconstitutional.

  30. Speaking is more powerful then silence. Instead of almost taking this lying down by shutting up, we should fight back and make sure everyone knows this. This is just *sick*.

  31. Speaking is more powerful then silence. Instead of almost taking this lying down by shutting up, we should fight back and make sure everyone knows this. This is just *sick*.

  32. I am not a fan of government control and legislation for every thing. Historically though whenever our society has demonstrated an inability to handle a technology or percieved “right” (even if overtly stated as such in the Constition as an amendment) legislation has followed to curtail the “right” for the betterment of society. When automobiles were introduced their was no such thing as a driver license or DUI. As the technology proliferated and subsequent abuse followed legislation was put in place to deal with the percieved issues. The Internet and the blogosphere are relatively new and it is only a matter of time before some types of legislation are put in place that directly concern this communications medium. The nature and degree of that legislation will be framed to the degree to which they have been misused and public perception sees this as an issue. Unfortunately the very fringe elements that espouse their freedom of speech will by their actions be the very ones that contribute to the curtaling of all our “right” to say what we want.
    The whole incident with Kathy has served to bring to light an epidemic of crassness, lewdness, and incivility that too often crosses the line as their is no percieved consequences to peoples actions online. Its sad to see and sadder to that it will come back to haunt us all.
    I think it is up to al of us who do cherish our right to speech to speak up and against this behavior. I have posted my own little piece at http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blogs/mikeg/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=134 If we don’t corral this kind of thing then the core rights of life, liberty, and the the pursuit of happiness will, and rightly should dictate a modification of our amendment rights which I think we would all hate to see.

  33. I am not a fan of government control and legislation for every thing. Historically though whenever our society has demonstrated an inability to handle a technology or percieved “right” (even if overtly stated as such in the Constition as an amendment) legislation has followed to curtail the “right” for the betterment of society. When automobiles were introduced their was no such thing as a driver license or DUI. As the technology proliferated and subsequent abuse followed legislation was put in place to deal with the percieved issues. The Internet and the blogosphere are relatively new and it is only a matter of time before some types of legislation are put in place that directly concern this communications medium. The nature and degree of that legislation will be framed to the degree to which they have been misused and public perception sees this as an issue. Unfortunately the very fringe elements that espouse their freedom of speech will by their actions be the very ones that contribute to the curtaling of all our “right” to say what we want.
    The whole incident with Kathy has served to bring to light an epidemic of crassness, lewdness, and incivility that too often crosses the line as their is no percieved consequences to peoples actions online. Its sad to see and sadder to that it will come back to haunt us all.
    I think it is up to al of us who do cherish our right to speech to speak up and against this behavior. I have posted my own little piece at http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/blogs/mikeg/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=134 If we don’t corral this kind of thing then the core rights of life, liberty, and the the pursuit of happiness will, and rightly should dictate a modification of our amendment rights which I think we would all hate to see.

  34. Some real-estate bubble bloggers have been getting death threats. Just one example: the Marin county bubble blogger stopped writing for a couple months this year due to a death threat, but courageously decided to start up again.

    http://marinrealestatebubble.blogspot.com/2007/03/dear-marin-re-terrorist.html

    What is it that gets people so irate about someone writing articles claiming property values are set to crash? The one thing that sets the Marin country blogger apart from many others in this genre is that he seems to do actual investigative field work, highlighting local properties he thinks are particularly over-priced. Maybe this has made caused some people to take his postings more “personally” than other bubble-blogs, which do little more than comment on data available in the general media.

  35. Some real-estate bubble bloggers have been getting death threats. Just one example: the Marin county bubble blogger stopped writing for a couple months this year due to a death threat, but courageously decided to start up again.

    http://marinrealestatebubble.blogspot.com/2007/03/dear-marin-re-terrorist.html

    What is it that gets people so irate about someone writing articles claiming property values are set to crash? The one thing that sets the Marin country blogger apart from many others in this genre is that he seems to do actual investigative field work, highlighting local properties he thinks are particularly over-priced. Maybe this has made caused some people to take his postings more “personally” than other bubble-blogs, which do little more than comment on data available in the general media.

  36. Thank you. Admittedly I travel in a very small circle, but the techies I know are all gentlemen and ladies. The jerks are jerks in every sector, town and cyber. As a female attorney, I shared the field with plenty of jerks, but plenty of gentlemen, too. And, libertarian type that I am, I aver that hate speech and intimidation and appropriation and mutilation of anyone’s image for those purposes should not be protected speech.

    I moderate my blog (even though I’m very small time) and would have no compunctions about clicking the NO box at the moderation panel. I haven’t been approached by any toxic people yet, and I appreciate your call to solidarity to expose and repel such conduct. I will suspend posting until Monday as well, as soon as I launch a quick post today explaining the reason.

  37. Thank you. Admittedly I travel in a very small circle, but the techies I know are all gentlemen and ladies. The jerks are jerks in every sector, town and cyber. As a female attorney, I shared the field with plenty of jerks, but plenty of gentlemen, too. And, libertarian type that I am, I aver that hate speech and intimidation and appropriation and mutilation of anyone’s image for those purposes should not be protected speech.

    I moderate my blog (even though I’m very small time) and would have no compunctions about clicking the NO box at the moderation panel. I haven’t been approached by any toxic people yet, and I appreciate your call to solidarity to expose and repel such conduct. I will suspend posting until Monday as well, as soon as I launch a quick post today explaining the reason.

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