I finally get “semantic” Web

Yesterday I got a look at Radar Networks’ stealth stuff. It won’t be on the market until later this year but for the first time I finally understood what the semantic Web was all about and what benefits it’d bring us.

I don’t think I could explain it in ASCII text. I think that’s the problem. I read Tim Berners-Lee’s paper. I didn’t get it. I read tons of other stuff about it. I didn’t get it. It took someone building a new system and demonstrating it to me for me to get it.

Basically Web pages will no longer be just pages, or posts. They’ll all be split up into little objects, stored in a database (a massive, scalable one at that) and then your words can be displayed in different ways. Imagine a really awesome search engine that could bring back much much more granular stuff than Google can today. Or, heck, imagine you could view my blog by posts with most inbound links.

And I’m not even doing it justice (and I’ve been asked not to reveal what Radar really is doing until later this year).

It’s funny, yesterday I was thinking to myself “the industry has gotten boring.” Then came along Radar Networks, which definitely is doing something not boring.

79 thoughts on “I finally get “semantic” Web

  1. Pingback: Web 2.0 is Dead
  2. Well, there is some interesting technology out there to make this happen. (See otnsemanticweb.oracle.com for an example.) The key is not having to rely on human operators for metadata tagging.

  3. Well, there is some interesting technology out there to make this happen. (See otnsemanticweb.oracle.com for an example.) The key is not having to rely on human operators for metadata tagging.

  4. Robert,

    Glad you’re feeling better. BTW, I don’t think that Radar will be alone in opening up the Web 3.0 space. Recently we’ve seen a MUVE game that is entirely composed with semantic agents in a multi-user 3D immersive environment based on Croquet.

    Also, there are a number of plays that are pushing well beyond the threshold of keyword searching. Some now fully combine semantics and linguistics.

    fourth quarter 2007 should be interesting

    Mills Davis.

  5. Robert,

    Glad you’re feeling better. BTW, I don’t think that Radar will be alone in opening up the Web 3.0 space. Recently we’ve seen a MUVE game that is entirely composed with semantic agents in a multi-user 3D immersive environment based on Croquet.

    Also, there are a number of plays that are pushing well beyond the threshold of keyword searching. Some now fully combine semantics and linguistics.

    fourth quarter 2007 should be interesting

    Mills Davis.

  6. the Web is filled with wonderful information but finding that information isn’t always easy. And when you find something good, it often comes with baggage. If you want to know how to make an ipod costume for your dog you might enjoy my website, but you might also be annoyed by my sense of humor or maybe you hate liberals. You should be able to learn how to dress up your dog and turn him into an Apple marketing machine without also having to read my godless anti-Technorati tirades, shouldn’t you? The answer is a qualified maybe.

    Read the rest at:
    http://www.elainevigneault.com/2007/04/08/semantic-web-and-the-future-of-the-internet.html

  7. the Web is filled with wonderful information but finding that information isn’t always easy. And when you find something good, it often comes with baggage. If you want to know how to make an ipod costume for your dog you might enjoy my website, but you might also be annoyed by my sense of humor or maybe you hate liberals. You should be able to learn how to dress up your dog and turn him into an Apple marketing machine without also having to read my godless anti-Technorati tirades, shouldn’t you? The answer is a qualified maybe.

    Read the rest at:
    http://www.elainevigneault.com/2007/04/08/semantic-web-and-the-future-of-the-internet.html

  8. Robert, there’s no need for the Semantic Web to get everything you described in this post. I’ll note that there’s probably more than you can discuss here, but based on what you have listed you can do that today w/a technology called Readware (readware.com). Not boasting about it, just saying that what you’ve described is already possible.

  9. Robert, there’s no need for the Semantic Web to get everything you described in this post. I’ll note that there’s probably more than you can discuss here, but based on what you have listed you can do that today w/a technology called Readware (readware.com). Not boasting about it, just saying that what you’ve described is already possible.

  10. Streambase, Numenta, Cycorp and Freebase all seem to be doing interesting nextgen projects. When the underlying emerging technologies of these companies gets mashed up the fun really begins. Think machines learning from video feeds.

  11. Streambase, Numenta, Cycorp and Freebase all seem to be doing interesting nextgen projects. When the underlying emerging technologies of these companies gets mashed up the fun really begins. Think machines learning from video feeds.

  12. Some very very good points of view here Robert. Not trying to do the impossible and change anyone’s mind, but I am pretty sure the Internet is not going to remain in its current configuration forever.

    If we think about this with a kind of logic that applies a historical innovation index of some kind, html and other languages might be compared to any innovation or language.

    Take linear A compared to linear B. No one has yet gained a full understanding of Linear A, yet it served the most advanced civilization of the bronze age for 2000 or more years.

    Linear B was translated when the Rosetta stone was deciphered and it bears some similarity to linear A. For those that don’t know Linear B was the early language of the Greeks (those guys our culture and other stuff came from).

    In a similar way html, XML and the others have served us well, but is it time to look deeper? Hell, mathematics cannot even give anyone an exact measurement of a circle or any derivative of pi. It does not mean it is useless, but it does suggest that there is something (quark-tile theory of inter-dimensional mathematics etc.) that could reveal greater discoveries.

    So, given my introduction to AI, fuzzy logic and semantic search offered By Riza Berkan of hakia search, I am leaning toward semantics. Just another opinion of course, but the law of probability and history assures us of this. We no longer use punch cards to tabulate bank data on computers the size of whole floors (1975), Windows 95 is no longer our preferred OS, we watch LCD high def TV’s rather than black and white(1965) and Google has been around (in computer years) as long as the transistor radio. :)

  13. Some very very good points of view here Robert. Not trying to do the impossible and change anyone’s mind, but I am pretty sure the Internet is not going to remain in its current configuration forever.

    If we think about this with a kind of logic that applies a historical innovation index of some kind, html and other languages might be compared to any innovation or language.

    Take linear A compared to linear B. No one has yet gained a full understanding of Linear A, yet it served the most advanced civilization of the bronze age for 2000 or more years.

    Linear B was translated when the Rosetta stone was deciphered and it bears some similarity to linear A. For those that don’t know Linear B was the early language of the Greeks (those guys our culture and other stuff came from).

    In a similar way html, XML and the others have served us well, but is it time to look deeper? Hell, mathematics cannot even give anyone an exact measurement of a circle or any derivative of pi. It does not mean it is useless, but it does suggest that there is something (quark-tile theory of inter-dimensional mathematics etc.) that could reveal greater discoveries.

    So, given my introduction to AI, fuzzy logic and semantic search offered By Riza Berkan of hakia search, I am leaning toward semantics. Just another opinion of course, but the law of probability and history assures us of this. We no longer use punch cards to tabulate bank data on computers the size of whole floors (1975), Windows 95 is no longer our preferred OS, we watch LCD high def TV’s rather than black and white(1965) and Google has been around (in computer years) as long as the transistor radio. :)

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