Did Digg do something?

Heheh, if you’ve been over at TechMeme you know all about the Digg story so I won’t even bother putting stuff about that on my link blog.

There’s an interesting Silverlight Hype Backlash going, I posted a couple of things about that. MindManager 7 is coming out. So is Mathmatica 6. Oprah has video of Google. Splashcast is pissing off podcasters because they are rehosting their audio and video. All that and more on my link blog.

Over on ScobleShow there’s a cool app for photographers that’ll help you make photo stories. More to come later, got an interview with Scott Guthrie of Microsoft coming up later tonight.

More than 600 emails waiting. Sorry, gotta run…

58 thoughts on “Did Digg do something?

  1. BTW, artists ‘need’ the RIAA because it’s a cartel with reaches into the (cosolidated) media and tour locations. Ask Pearl Jam what happened when they dared ignore Clear Channel…

    I think you’ll see more and more go the independant route as they get out of their contracts, though.

  2. BTW, artists ‘need’ the RIAA because it’s a cartel with reaches into the (cosolidated) media and tour locations. Ask Pearl Jam what happened when they dared ignore Clear Channel…

    I think you’ll see more and more go the independant route as they get out of their contracts, though.

  3. “Yes there is no guarantee you won’t break the law. Which is exactly the point, and EXACTLY the reasons these companies implement these technologie.”

    That don’t work. So who wins again, millions into the coffers of a broken encrypion scheme and a law that curtails free speech? When has DRM ever stopped people who want to share media online, vs legitimate customers? Do you know of any HD-DVDs that aren’t on torrent sites right now? How about DVDs? How come those seemed to sell so well even though you could download them since 1999?

    I don’t think the founding fathers had DRM in mind when they allowed for a limited copyright for the benefit of the people, either (although “limited” seems to have been lost in the shuffle of the Sunny Bono act, too)

  4. “Yes there is no guarantee you won’t break the law. Which is exactly the point, and EXACTLY the reasons these companies implement these technologie.”

    That don’t work. So who wins again, millions into the coffers of a broken encrypion scheme and a law that curtails free speech? When has DRM ever stopped people who want to share media online, vs legitimate customers? Do you know of any HD-DVDs that aren’t on torrent sites right now? How about DVDs? How come those seemed to sell so well even though you could download them since 1999?

    I don’t think the founding fathers had DRM in mind when they allowed for a limited copyright for the benefit of the people, either (although “limited” seems to have been lost in the shuffle of the Sunny Bono act, too)

  5. @20. Somehow I dont’ think Ben Franklin had copyright laws in mind when he made that statement. I think he was referring to something much larger. I could be wrong, but I don’t think so. So, again you try to redirect the argument.

    Yes there is no guarantee you won’t break the law. Which is exactly the point, and EXACTLY the reasons these companies implement these technologie.

    @5 Citing a band that had already made their millions buy SELLING their music through traditional means is hardly a valid example. They can afford to give their stuff away.

    Mr. Robinson is right. The Fair Use crowd wants to have it both ways. Ask them about piracy and theft and they have no answer.

  6. @20. Somehow I dont’ think Ben Franklin had copyright laws in mind when he made that statement. I think he was referring to something much larger. I could be wrong, but I don’t think so. So, again you try to redirect the argument.

    Yes there is no guarantee you won’t break the law. Which is exactly the point, and EXACTLY the reasons these companies implement these technologie.

    @5 Citing a band that had already made their millions buy SELLING their music through traditional means is hardly a valid example. They can afford to give their stuff away.

    Mr. Robinson is right. The Fair Use crowd wants to have it both ways. Ask them about piracy and theft and they have no answer.

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