8 thoughts on “Followup to my Autism post

  1. Raising someone with ASD is so hard, I take my hat off to someone who manages to keep personally vested in every minute of it, like Sridhar Vembu seems to, AND manages to continue moving up and ahead.

    One thing that I don’t think was mentioned in the previous post is that the IDEA Act, which is supposed to supply the money to help with early school intervention for disabled children, has ALWAYS been underfunded. And, even in the hands of Democrats doesn’t appear headed for full-funding.

    Here in Chapel Hill, we have a world-leading autism study group as well, and like in Silicon Valley it is hard to tell which came first the group or the massive ASD population. Either way, even in a great place like this the education system is strained to take care of these kids properly.

  2. Raising someone with ASD is so hard, I take my hat off to someone who manages to keep personally vested in every minute of it, like Sridhar Vembu seems to, AND manages to continue moving up and ahead.

    One thing that I don’t think was mentioned in the previous post is that the IDEA Act, which is supposed to supply the money to help with early school intervention for disabled children, has ALWAYS been underfunded. And, even in the hands of Democrats doesn’t appear headed for full-funding.

    Here in Chapel Hill, we have a world-leading autism study group as well, and like in Silicon Valley it is hard to tell which came first the group or the massive ASD population. Either way, even in a great place like this the education system is strained to take care of these kids properly.

  3. Thanks for the link, Robert. With perfect timing Blogware (the platform I use) went down this morning. It’s been down for ours, and they don’t bother giving us an estimated uptime.

    Sorry everyone, please try a few hours later :-(

  4. Thanks for the link, Robert. With perfect timing Blogware (the platform I use) went down this morning. It’s been down for ours, and they don’t bother giving us an estimated uptime.

    Sorry everyone, please try a few hours later :-(

  5. Some while back I read the wired piece that one of your earlier commenters linked to http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aspergers_pr.html and I did the AQ quiz linked to at the end.
    It says “the average score in the control group was 16.4. Eighty percent of those diagnosed with autism or a related disorder scored 32 or higher” . I scored 48. It explained a lot for me, and I now think of myself as somewhere on the Autistic spectrum.

    Work brought me into contact with a school for severely autisitic children. I’m nothing like them. And I thankful that although my kids may be like me – that is not neuro-typical – they are miles from that. This is a spectrum condition (I reject the word “disorder” for the class that I fall into). And the label means different things to different people

    As for why we’re interested – not only are seeing more cases, but – As the wierd piece puts it.

    “It’s a familiar joke in the industry that many of the hardcore programmers in IT strongholds… …are residing somewhere in Asperger’s domain. Kathryn Stewart, director of the Orion Academy… …calls Asperger’s syndrome “the engineers’ disorder.” Bill Gates is regularly diagnosed in the press… …In Microserfs, novelist Douglas Coupland observes, “I think all tech people are slightly autistic.”

    This they say “is not unique to the Valley. The halls of academe have long been a forgiving environment for absentminded professors. Temple Grandin – the inspiring and accomplished autistic woman profiled in Oliver Sacks’ An Anthropologist on Mars – calls NASA the largest sheltered workshop in the world. “

  6. Some while back I read the wired piece that one of your earlier commenters linked to http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/9.12/aspergers_pr.html and I did the AQ quiz linked to at the end.
    It says “the average score in the control group was 16.4. Eighty percent of those diagnosed with autism or a related disorder scored 32 or higher” . I scored 48. It explained a lot for me, and I now think of myself as somewhere on the Autistic spectrum.

    Work brought me into contact with a school for severely autisitic children. I’m nothing like them. And I thankful that although my kids may be like me – that is not neuro-typical – they are miles from that. This is a spectrum condition (I reject the word “disorder” for the class that I fall into). And the label means different things to different people

    As for why we’re interested – not only are seeing more cases, but – As the wierd piece puts it.

    “It’s a familiar joke in the industry that many of the hardcore programmers in IT strongholds… …are residing somewhere in Asperger’s domain. Kathryn Stewart, director of the Orion Academy… …calls Asperger’s syndrome “the engineers’ disorder.” Bill Gates is regularly diagnosed in the press… …In Microserfs, novelist Douglas Coupland observes, “I think all tech people are slightly autistic.”

    This they say “is not unique to the Valley. The halls of academe have long been a forgiving environment for absentminded professors. Temple Grandin – the inspiring and accomplished autistic woman profiled in Oliver Sacks’ An Anthropologist on Mars – calls NASA the largest sheltered workshop in the world. “

Comments are closed.