Today’s book: the 4-Hour Workweek

Today I’m traveling to Atlanta to a BEA event. So, that means it’s time for another book. The one I picked? The 4-Hour Workweek. I’ve already started on it, and have had lunch with author Timothy Ferriss a few times already.

It has already become a sensation. Is on the New York Times best seller list.

How did he market it? Talked with bloggers. Anything else? Not really. The dude doesn’t work hard. Just like his book says.

Me? I don’t work hard either. How’s that? I just define work as something everyone other than me does. For instance, the hardest worker is a roofer in Mexico in the summer time. Now THAT is work. What I do? Not work.

Oh, I’m interviewing him in at 10 a.m. at PodTech too. Is that work? :-)

56 thoughts on “Today’s book: the 4-Hour Workweek

  1. His suggestion to use Jott and Grand Central make compelling sense, as does his call to “batching” key tasks. And everybody can use a little 80/20 refresher.

    Happy holidays!

  2. His suggestion to use Jott and Grand Central make compelling sense, as does his call to “batching” key tasks. And everybody can use a little 80/20 refresher.

    Happy holidays!

  3. The title of the book “The 4-hour workweek” is much like any headline in the NY Times – it’s designed to get your attention.

    If you don’t take it literally and actually read the book, there is some very good information in there and some good ideas. From my experience, most people who read the book will not end up with a 4 hour work week, but some will learn a few things, apply them to their own lives, and make some improvements in either their ability to make money or getting more time at home. And that’s not a bad thing

    I would say comparisons with Tony Robbins are a bit unfair – at least Tim Ferris gives you have half way decent ideas about how you might go about improving your life vs just “feeling good and releasing your personal power blah blah”

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