Celebrity won’t save you

I just did a quick read through all my feeds and, boy, are people down on Guy Kawasaki’s “Truemors” site. Tony Hung at Deep Jive Interests says that celebrity is how it might succeed.

Indeed, it’s because Guy Kawasaki was involved that I checked it out in the first place.

My reaction? I agree with Shelley Powers when she says: “What is [Truemors]? It’s the site that made Twitter look good, by comparison.”

Of course, there’s no such thing as bad PR on the blogosphere. Well, except silence. That’s the most damning thing of all.

Comments

  1. No question that it looks like beaten with the ugly stick — repeatedly.

    Celebrity will help it off the ground.

    What it does to cultivate that community, encourage useful content, and filter out the spam / crap / gaming, however, is an altogether different issue.

    Welcome to Web2.0, Guy. Time to walk the walk. ;)

    Cheers
    t @ dji

  2. No question that it looks like beaten with the ugly stick — repeatedly.

    Celebrity will help it off the ground.

    What it does to cultivate that community, encourage useful content, and filter out the spam / crap / gaming, however, is an altogether different issue.

    Welcome to Web2.0, Guy. Time to walk the walk. ;)

    Cheers
    t @ dji

  3. Guy Kawasaki is an amazing man and I value what he has to say.

    Scoble, I’ve asked before on posts here why you don’t interview him for a video. He’s one of the most valuable people in the industry, and arguably the best speaker author for startups and marketing. His no BS, no bozos approach is refreshing, enlightening, and entertaining.

  4. Guy Kawasaki is an amazing man and I value what he has to say.

    Scoble, I’ve asked before on posts here why you don’t interview him for a video. He’s one of the most valuable people in the industry, and arguably the best speaker author for startups and marketing. His no BS, no bozos approach is refreshing, enlightening, and entertaining.

  5. Yeah, but I don’t know that I would necessarily take to heart from someone who doesn’t at least get Twitter. You don’t have to like it, but there’s something to the application. The web aspect of it isn’t cool, but the text element really is. I could see the interest in younger people to have that sort of SMS interactivity. I liked it and I’m in my 30s. Far greater, though, is what it points to with regards to user connectivity and interaction. I think it’s one of many signs of what’s next.

  6. Yeah, but I don’t know that I would necessarily take to heart from someone who doesn’t at least get Twitter. You don’t have to like it, but there’s something to the application. The web aspect of it isn’t cool, but the text element really is. I could see the interest in younger people to have that sort of SMS interactivity. I liked it and I’m in my 30s. Far greater, though, is what it points to with regards to user connectivity and interaction. I think it’s one of many signs of what’s next.

  7. Twitter is the latest “darling” with the geeks, and this, too, will pass.

    Some other “killer” thingie will come out soon and people will forget all about Twitter.

    People see stuff like Twitter and they think they’ve found some kind of panacea.

    Guy Kawasaki sees and has seen it all. Men like him know the industry, the key players, and can more or less see where the industry is heading. I’ll take Guy’s thoughts over almost anyone elses.

  8. I wish someone would do a study on the average age group on Twitter. I’m willing to bet it’s a largely older crowd.

    The younger crowd is on Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, IM, and a variety of other platforms that provide much more utility than Twitter. IM, Facebook, and Bebo even include Twitter-like functionality. All these applications provide SMS functionality, infact IM services were first. The older generation is simply discovering ways to use tools that the younger generation has grasped for ages. How do you sell Twitter to a teen who’s been using IM et al their entire life?

    And for the older generation, here’s a good test. When I got my parents on MSN, I sold them on the fact that we could chat back and forth in real time. If I were to ask my parents to join Facebook, I’d tell them they could network with past high school and work collegues. I’d probably have a hard time selling MySpace or Bebo. But, why would they want to join Twitter? So they broadcast their lives to the entire world? They would probably be more comfortable using Facebook to broadcast information to their closed group of friends and family. In my opinion, if an application can pass the ‘parent test’, there’s something amazingly powerful. Facebook was incredibly smart not to sell.

    As for Truemors, it’s very strange that Kawasaki is involved. He’s usually very adamant, especially in his talks, about avoiding the latest social network wannabees.

  9. I wish someone would do a study on the average age group on Twitter. I’m willing to bet it’s a largely older crowd.

    The younger crowd is on Facebook, MySpace, Bebo, IM, and a variety of other platforms that provide much more utility than Twitter. IM, Facebook, and Bebo even include Twitter-like functionality. All these applications provide SMS functionality, infact IM services were first. The older generation is simply discovering ways to use tools that the younger generation has grasped for ages. How do you sell Twitter to a teen who’s been using IM et al their entire life?

    And for the older generation, here’s a good test. When I got my parents on MSN, I sold them on the fact that we could chat back and forth in real time. If I were to ask my parents to join Facebook, I’d tell them they could network with past high school and work collegues. I’d probably have a hard time selling MySpace or Bebo. But, why would they want to join Twitter? So they broadcast their lives to the entire world? They would probably be more comfortable using Facebook to broadcast information to their closed group of friends and family. In my opinion, if an application can pass the ‘parent test’, there’s something amazingly powerful. Facebook was incredibly smart not to sell.

    As for Truemors, it’s very strange that Kawasaki is involved. He’s usually very adamant, especially in his talks, about avoiding the latest social network wannabees.

  10. Twitter is the latest “darling” with the geeks, and this, too, will pass.

    Some other “killer” thingie will come out soon and people will forget all about Twitter.

    People see stuff like Twitter and they think they’ve found some kind of panacea.

    Guy Kawasaki sees and has seen it all. Men like him know the industry, the key players, and can more or less see where the industry is heading. I’ll take Guy’s thoughts over almost anyone elses.

  11. I was quite surprised to find out that this was Guys new project. I don’t think it would have received a 50th of the press if guy wasn’t involved. I admit I haven’t taken a look at it, and don’t plan to. It might even be a raging success, but at least for a bit, Guy’s light is shining a little less brightly.

  12. I was quite surprised to find out that this was Guys new project. I don’t think it would have received a 50th of the press if guy wasn’t involved. I admit I haven’t taken a look at it, and don’t plan to. It might even be a raging success, but at least for a bit, Guy’s light is shining a little less brightly.

  13. [...] a week but today seems to be its coming out party. Techcrunch posted its third review of the site. Scoble, Data Mining, Frantic, and Pronet have reviews. So do all kinds of others. My RSS reader is full of [...]

  14. I haven’t actually looked at the site yet

    Why?

    Robert linked to Tony
    Tony linked to Techcrunch
    Techcrunch linked to Truemors

    I haven’t got to the Truemor’s tab yet in Firefox, but thought it odd that so few were linking direct, plus giving attribution to source.

  15. I haven’t actually looked at the site yet

    Why?

    Robert linked to Tony
    Tony linked to Techcrunch
    Techcrunch linked to Truemors

    I haven’t got to the Truemor’s tab yet in Firefox, but thought it odd that so few were linking direct, plus giving attribution to source.

  16. Now I have looked at the site, I am not sure how a WordPress blog, and a few plugins can be given a fanfare.

    Plus features?

    1. The pages are being updated with Ajax. I am not a programmer, but I doubt it would be too much work to get a theme adjusted to include Ajax and live updates.
    2. Some time was spent on implementing additional methods of posting, but they might just send the posts to the posting email address, thus I doubt it was too hard to integrate.

    I think it could have been done in such a way to be more “multimedia”, and at the same time require some kind of registration or authentication.

  17. Now I have looked at the site, I am not sure how a WordPress blog, and a few plugins can be given a fanfare.

    Plus features?

    1. The pages are being updated with Ajax. I am not a programmer, but I doubt it would be too much work to get a theme adjusted to include Ajax and live updates.
    2. Some time was spent on implementing additional methods of posting, but they might just send the posts to the posting email address, thus I doubt it was too hard to integrate.

    I think it could have been done in such a way to be more “multimedia”, and at the same time require some kind of registration or authentication.

  18. Truemors will be as smashingly successful as:

    - Squidoo
    - Bitpass (a-ha! another lemon Kawasaki bet on with a dark finish)
    - Odeo

    All had prominent people pushing them and while that helped pimp put some blogger juice and clubby backslapping at the end of the day a business model it did not make.

  19. Truemors will be as smashingly successful as:

    - Squidoo
    - Bitpass (a-ha! another lemon Kawasaki bet on with a dark finish)
    - Odeo

    All had prominent people pushing them and while that helped pimp put some blogger juice and clubby backslapping at the end of the day a business model it did not make.

  20. The difference between this site and something like squidoo or odeo is that it was basically free to develop, which also explains things like, why the updating isn’t ajax based. It was probably done on the cheap. Personally, I kinda like it. I probably won’t actually go to it, but it looks to me like the signal-to-noise ratio is already sorting itself out. Right now, the “greatest” links all seem to legitimate rumors/links.

    Maybe it won’t ever be a digg, but if it only took a few thousand dollars to develop, it doesn’t need to be.

  21. The difference between this site and something like squidoo or odeo is that it was basically free to develop, which also explains things like, why the updating isn’t ajax based. It was probably done on the cheap. Personally, I kinda like it. I probably won’t actually go to it, but it looks to me like the signal-to-noise ratio is already sorting itself out. Right now, the “greatest” links all seem to legitimate rumors/links.

    Maybe it won’t ever be a digg, but if it only took a few thousand dollars to develop, it doesn’t need to be.

  22. You gotta appreciate this:

    Blowhard vs Blowhard.

    To the death! Fight ON! Don’t hold back!

  23. You gotta appreciate this:

    Blowhard vs Blowhard.

    To the death! Fight ON! Don’t hold back!