The counterpoint to Mike’s post…

I also remember 2001/2002. I had a car wreck, 9/11 happened, my grandma died, I had to lay myself off, was unemployed for a couple of months, got divorced, etc.

Today I look out the window of my beautiful Half Moon Bay house and the sun is shining and I have tons of friends who are working to make all of our lives better, am married to a wonderful person, have a kid on the way, and I have thousands of tech bloggers to read where back then there were only a handful of good tech blogs.

I don’t want to go back to 2001/2002, thank you very much, even if that time did bring us a raft of blogging companies and forced Google to find a business model.

Comments

  1. I had a pretty rough 2002 myself.

    But I do think there’s a way to avoid the kind of frenzy we’re in now, it’s not healthy, and it seems unless we get better at investing in the next big thing this boom will eventually run out of gas and it will be bust times again.

  2. I had a pretty rough 2002 myself.

    But I do think there’s a way to avoid the kind of frenzy we’re in now, it’s not healthy, and it seems unless we get better at investing in the next big thing this boom will eventually run out of gas and it will be bust times again.

  3. Hey as long as we’re comiserating.

    I haven’t done this recently, but, seriously, ALL this happened to me in a year around 2000-2001

    1. My father had a heart attack
    2. I changed jobs twice (including a few weeks with no pay at a startup)
    3. I moved twice.
    4. My wife had surgery.
    5. My job performance plummeted,
    6. 9/11
    7. My wife died (unrelated to the others).
    8. There was more, too, though abviously those win out.

    All this when I was 24-25 years old. I took one of those “stressful life events” counter things, where if you score over 100 your supposed to get some medical attnetion for stress and got about 500. I had spontaneous nosebleeds, spots in my vision, massive headaches, and many other physical ailments related to stress.

    It all makes me SO much more appreciative of everything I have now! I’m married again, with a child on the way about the same time as you, Robert. I’ve been steadily (and gainfully) employed, do very well at work, my family is all healthy, I have lived in one place for 2.5 years (longest time since I was in High School), and I have some wonderful friends and pets.

    It’s pretty much all uphill from 2000-2001.

  4. Hey as long as we’re comiserating.

    I haven’t done this recently, but, seriously, ALL this happened to me in a year around 2000-2001

    1. My father had a heart attack
    2. I changed jobs twice (including a few weeks with no pay at a startup)
    3. I moved twice.
    4. My wife had surgery.
    5. My job performance plummeted,
    6. 9/11
    7. My wife died (unrelated to the others).
    8. There was more, too, though abviously those win out.

    All this when I was 24-25 years old. I took one of those “stressful life events” counter things, where if you score over 100 your supposed to get some medical attnetion for stress and got about 500. I had spontaneous nosebleeds, spots in my vision, massive headaches, and many other physical ailments related to stress.

    It all makes me SO much more appreciative of everything I have now! I’m married again, with a child on the way about the same time as you, Robert. I’ve been steadily (and gainfully) employed, do very well at work, my family is all healthy, I have lived in one place for 2.5 years (longest time since I was in High School), and I have some wonderful friends and pets.

    It’s pretty much all uphill from 2000-2001.

  5. Check out this cat

    In 2001, I was doing exactly what I’m doing today, minus the nice office suite, in house servers, ricoh copier and water cooler.

    I remember getting an IM from my friend about 9/11, turning on CNN.

    I think I was actually making more money back then though. At any rate, not much has changed here. Same old same old, except it’s a SQL server and not a mail exchanger this time.
    If anything the environment for ISVs was actually much better in 2001 than it is now, because the .COM bust had not fully propagated yet.

  6. Check out this cat

    In 2001, I was doing exactly what I’m doing today, minus the nice office suite, in house servers, ricoh copier and water cooler.

    I remember getting an IM from my friend about 9/11, turning on CNN.

    I think I was actually making more money back then though. At any rate, not much has changed here. Same old same old, except it’s a SQL server and not a mail exchanger this time.
    If anything the environment for ISVs was actually much better in 2001 than it is now, because the .COM bust had not fully propagated yet.

  7. Interesting. Mike’s perspective is a reflection on the industry and your’s is a reflection on your life. These are two very different opinions.

  8. Interesting. Mike’s perspective is a reflection on the industry and your’s is a reflection on your life. These are two very different opinions.

  9. here’s my since 2001 list:

    1. I drove my old car into a pond, and submerged the engine.
    2. I got a new used car.
    3. I sold a lot of intellectual property
    4. I worked on an IBM subaccount
    5. I incorporated and later got an office suite with 5 offices, and 4 employees
    6. I fired 2 of them
    7. I bought a brand new company car.
    8. Our vice president and my other board member left to join the FBI
    9. I joined a health club
    10. I refurbished my home recording studio with digital gear
    11. I stopped using windows in 2002 as my OS

    I literally feel like 2001 was yesterday though. It feels exactly the same.

  10. here’s my since 2001 list:

    1. I drove my old car into a pond, and submerged the engine.
    2. I got a new used car.
    3. I sold a lot of intellectual property
    4. I worked on an IBM subaccount
    5. I incorporated and later got an office suite with 5 offices, and 4 employees
    6. I fired 2 of them
    7. I bought a brand new company car.
    8. Our vice president and my other board member left to join the FBI
    9. I joined a health club
    10. I refurbished my home recording studio with digital gear
    11. I stopped using windows in 2002 as my OS

    I literally feel like 2001 was yesterday though. It feels exactly the same.

  11. Life has ups and downs, and is full of surprises.

    Sometimes my life feels like Fabio did on that fateful Busch Gardens roller coaster ride, when he got hit in the face by a low flying duck.

    Better Days to All!

  12. Life has ups and downs, and is full of surprises.

    Sometimes my life feels like Fabio did on that fateful Busch Gardens roller coaster ride, when he got hit in the face by a low flying duck.

    Better Days to All!

  13. Not wanting to make a list, all I can say is that life is just great and keeps getting better, even though my par is at deaths door and my wife is expecting our second child :-!

    2001, yeah that was a toughy all right; sold the house, went naked for awhile in France eventually finding solitude and a good work/life balance in Ireland. Now I live near a farm, work in IT three days and fly a microlight (ultralight to you yanks) out of a small farm strip :-) Lot’s of endless space to roam in. Also gives you a new perspective on life when looking down on the earth. After that I run about 20 miles a week, which is something I recommend to any of you lard arses out there who spend too much time at the keyboard – certainly keeps the pork down I can tell you. ROFL

  14. Not wanting to make a list, all I can say is that life is just great and keeps getting better, even though my par is at deaths door and my wife is expecting our second child :-!

    2001, yeah that was a toughy all right; sold the house, went naked for awhile in France eventually finding solitude and a good work/life balance in Ireland. Now I live near a farm, work in IT three days and fly a microlight (ultralight to you yanks) out of a small farm strip :-) Lot’s of endless space to roam in. Also gives you a new perspective on life when looking down on the earth. After that I run about 20 miles a week, which is something I recommend to any of you lard arses out there who spend too much time at the keyboard – certainly keeps the pork down I can tell you. ROFL

  15. I absolutely hated the 90s and the early 00s. They were bad times. My favorite period of my life was the early 80s and now.

    A man is nothing more than the sum of his experiences. I now have a child and I see things differently than before. I moved from the big city to a small town. My paycheck dropped by 75%. I’m far happier than I was. I escaped the rat race. IF I could afford it, I’d live on an island somewhere and really get remote.

  16. I absolutely hated the 90s and the early 00s. They were bad times. My favorite period of my life was the early 80s and now.

    A man is nothing more than the sum of his experiences. I now have a child and I see things differently than before. I moved from the big city to a small town. My paycheck dropped by 75%. I’m far happier than I was. I escaped the rat race. IF I could afford it, I’d live on an island somewhere and really get remote.

  17. I’m not sure how talking about our personal lives regarding 2001 vs now can be used as a “couterpoint” to what’s going on in “the valley” right now. Your personal lives may be better now than in 2001, but I’m sure that others’ personal lives are worse today than in 2001. (My own personal life is worse today than in 2001 due to health issues.) Neither has any relation to Silicon Valley, and can’t seriously be used as a counterpoint to Mike’s post.

  18. I’m not sure how talking about our personal lives regarding 2001 vs now can be used as a “couterpoint” to what’s going on in “the valley” right now. Your personal lives may be better now than in 2001, but I’m sure that others’ personal lives are worse today than in 2001. (My own personal life is worse today than in 2001 due to health issues.) Neither has any relation to Silicon Valley, and can’t seriously be used as a counterpoint to Mike’s post.

  19. 1. Also got laid off.
    2. Also stopped using Windows.
    3. Realized I didn’t actually *need* my work income and moved to the beach.
    4. 9/11
    5. Stopped drinking, got religion, started trying to reform a drunk friend (succeeded after 3 years).

    Indeed a mixed bag. But in general the disruption was good.

    As I’ve stated before though, I think there is TOO MUCH concentration of identically thinking people in Silicon Valley, a “monoculture” if you will. Strength and weakness in that. As a ceter for certain tech activities it is fine, as the primary place where all of it gets started it sucks. The area *used* to be a nice place to visit. I’m not too sure any more. There are plenty of coastal and otherwise pleasant communities that would make excellent SV II, and III type locations. The bubble in SV I needs to permanently burst before these places can get any traction I think. In this day and age the notion that we all need to be in one geographical area is ridiculous. Open Source is doing just fine planet-wide. No reason the commercial aspects of Silicon Valley can’t do likewise (other than inertia, which the SV inhabitants are much more succeptible to than they know).

  20. 1. Also got laid off.
    2. Also stopped using Windows.
    3. Realized I didn’t actually *need* my work income and moved to the beach.
    4. 9/11
    5. Stopped drinking, got religion, started trying to reform a drunk friend (succeeded after 3 years).

    Indeed a mixed bag. But in general the disruption was good.

    As I’ve stated before though, I think there is TOO MUCH concentration of identically thinking people in Silicon Valley, a “monoculture” if you will. Strength and weakness in that. As a ceter for certain tech activities it is fine, as the primary place where all of it gets started it sucks. The area *used* to be a nice place to visit. I’m not too sure any more. There are plenty of coastal and otherwise pleasant communities that would make excellent SV II, and III type locations. The bubble in SV I needs to permanently burst before these places can get any traction I think. In this day and age the notion that we all need to be in one geographical area is ridiculous. Open Source is doing just fine planet-wide. No reason the commercial aspects of Silicon Valley can’t do likewise (other than inertia, which the SV inhabitants are much more succeptible to than they know).