Microsoft postpones PDC

Mary Jo Foley (she’s been covering Microsoft for a long time) has the news: Microsoft has postponed the PDC that it had planned for later this year.

The PDC stands for “Professional Developer’s Conference.” It happens only when Microsoft knows it’ll have a major new platform to announce. Usually a new version of Windows or a new Internet strategy.

So, this means a couple of things: no new Windows and no major new Internet strategy this year.

Contrast this to Google who is holding a huge developer day next week (it sold out, so I won’t even bother linking to it). Or Facebook, who held a big developer-centric shindig today.

Some other things I’m hearing about the next version of Windows? There still is a ban on .NET code in core parts of Windows. They aren’t getting enough performance yet from .NET to include code written in it inside major parts of Windows. This is a bummer, because .NET is a lot easier to write than C++ and letting Microsoft’s developers write .NET code for Windows would unleash a bunch of innovation.

The person who told me this (who works at Microsoft) told me .NET still takes too long to startup and load into memory and because Windows is now being compared to OSX they can’t afford to ship components that would slow down Windows.

Before every MVP jumps me in the alley yes, I know the .NET runtimes ship with Vista. But almost no Vista code was written in .NET (if any, actually). Microsoft tries to keep this secret because they know it gives a black eye to .NET. After all, if Microsoft is unwilling to use it to develop Windows or Office, why should the rest of us base our life on it? Easy, it’s a lot more productive for the rest of us to write code in .NET and now Silverlight, which uses .NET’s compiler and part of its framework at heart, than to fall back to C++. Pick the right tool for the job and all that.

It also means that Ray Ozzie’s team probably doesn’t have anything dramatic to announce yet and they aren’t willing to have live within the bounds of a forcing function like the PDC (PDC forces teams to get their acts together and finish off stuff enough to at least get some good demos together).

The last few PDCs haven’t exactly been huge successes, though. Hailstorm was announced at one and later was killed. Longhorn was announced at another and later was delayed and many things that were shown off were later killed too.

Now that Google, Amazon, Apple, are shipping platforms that are more and more interesting to Microsoft’s developer community Microsoft has to play a different game. One where they can’t keep showing off stuff that never ships. The stakes are going up in the Internet game and Microsoft doesn’t seem to have a good answer to what’s coming next.

Some other things I’m hearing from the Windows team? That they are still planning out the next version of Windows. So, I don’t expect to see a beta until 2008 (probably second half of the year, if we see one at all) and I don’t expect to see a major new version of Windows to ship until 2009.

Anyway, this is sad cause I was hoping to see Microsoft make an all out push for developers this year.

What do you think it all means? Am I reading too much in between the lines?

159 thoughts on “Microsoft postpones PDC

  1. “Apple’s WWDCs, which, despite the “DC” in the name, are aimed at consumers rather than devs. ”

    What are you, stupid or something? You’ve obviously never attended Apple’s developer conference. Take a look at the session descriptions, and then try to tell me that WWDC is for consumers.

  2. David Balder: I’m not talking about Minesweeper. In case you haven’t noticed, Vista has a lot more built-in games than XP.

  3. David Balder: I’m not talking about Minesweeper. In case you haven’t noticed, Vista has a lot more built-in games than XP.

  4. “This is a bummer, because .NET is a lot easier to write than C++ and letting Microsoft’s developers write .NET code for Windows would unleash a bunch of innovation.”

    Robert, that statement is clinically retarded. That’s like saying writing a novel in French instead of English will unleash some kind of new theme in literature.

  5. “This is a bummer, because .NET is a lot easier to write than C++ and letting Microsoft’s developers write .NET code for Windows would unleash a bunch of innovation.”

    Robert, that statement is clinically retarded. That’s like saying writing a novel in French instead of English will unleash some kind of new theme in literature.

  6. @61. Wait! You’re going back and checking C9 stats today compared to what they were when you were there? Then you are tracking that compared to your current stats? Can you say “insecure”? I thought you could.

    Just because it had a lot of hits isn’t a indication of quality. Hell, more people read People or USA Today than the NY Times or The Economist. Does that mean People and USA Today have better, more informative content?

  7. @61. Wait! You’re going back and checking C9 stats today compared to what they were when you were there? Then you are tracking that compared to your current stats? Can you say “insecure”? I thought you could.

    Just because it had a lot of hits isn’t a indication of quality. Hell, more people read People or USA Today than the NY Times or The Economist. Does that mean People and USA Today have better, more informative content?

  8. Robert,

    1. Powershell is .NET code and it is a very important piece of Windows Server 2008. Also, I think IIS 7 is so entrenched with ASP.NET you cannot tell where one starts and the other ends (but it is not necessarily a lot of .NET code, this I don’t know). All this is server stuff, but guess what? The same happened with Java. The sweet spot for managed code is on the server. On the client it can become as good as on the server once you overcome some limitations, like the loading time problem you mentioned. Anyway, .NET is very usable on the client side and I expect Microsoft will use it more and more in its own products. I think there is some kind of culture clash here.
    2. For those that argue about the limitation to one CLR for process, I heard that future versions of .NET will run on only one CLR (the latest installed), only the BCL will differ, depending on the one compiled your apps against. This is the aim of the red / blue separation of code in the framework. Also, Scott Guthrie says that you can load Silverlight and other version of the CLR on the same process.
    3. Speaking of Silverlight, I don’t get what you mean by “it is a repurpose of .NET and it is not major”. It is indeed major (and it took a lot of work for Microsoft), and the fact that it is still .NET is its killer feature. Don’t forget the million of .NET developers that are happy to be “repurposed” along with it.
    4. About the PDCs being about Office and Windows as development platforms, I don’t think those are much relevant. The primary Microsoft “development platforms” these days are .NET and SQL Server, Windows and Office Server like Sharepoint are third and fourth, and Windows Live is probably on the rise. The Longhorn PDCs were very exciting because they were about the future of .NET and Microsoft eating its own dog food, making .NET even better. When they decided that they would not build Vista on WinFX but would instead backport most of WinFX to XP nobody cried (well, maybe some cried for WinFS). .NET got better anyway.

    Regards!

  9. Robert,

    1. Powershell is .NET code and it is a very important piece of Windows Server 2008. Also, I think IIS 7 is so entrenched with ASP.NET you cannot tell where one starts and the other ends (but it is not necessarily a lot of .NET code, this I don’t know). All this is server stuff, but guess what? The same happened with Java. The sweet spot for managed code is on the server. On the client it can become as good as on the server once you overcome some limitations, like the loading time problem you mentioned. Anyway, .NET is very usable on the client side and I expect Microsoft will use it more and more in its own products. I think there is some kind of culture clash here.
    2. For those that argue about the limitation to one CLR for process, I heard that future versions of .NET will run on only one CLR (the latest installed), only the BCL will differ, depending on the one compiled your apps against. This is the aim of the red / blue separation of code in the framework. Also, Scott Guthrie says that you can load Silverlight and other version of the CLR on the same process.
    3. Speaking of Silverlight, I don’t get what you mean by “it is a repurpose of .NET and it is not major”. It is indeed major (and it took a lot of work for Microsoft), and the fact that it is still .NET is its killer feature. Don’t forget the million of .NET developers that are happy to be “repurposed” along with it.
    4. About the PDCs being about Office and Windows as development platforms, I don’t think those are much relevant. The primary Microsoft “development platforms” these days are .NET and SQL Server, Windows and Office Server like Sharepoint are third and fourth, and Windows Live is probably on the rise. The Longhorn PDCs were very exciting because they were about the future of .NET and Microsoft eating its own dog food, making .NET even better. When they decided that they would not build Vista on WinFX but would instead backport most of WinFX to XP nobody cried (well, maybe some cried for WinFS). .NET got better anyway.

    Regards!

  10. “This is a bummer, because .NET is a lot easier to write than C++ and letting Microsoft’s developers write .NET code for Windows would unleash a bunch of innovation.”

    I’m pretty sure the core of Windows is C there Robert, not C++. You see, even C++ is not performant enough to write schedulers and low level IO.
    .NET makes writing very high level apps easy, it does not make writing system code easy at all. It makes it harder.
    Where you could just manipulate memory, now you have to go through several levels of indirection with .NET or Java.

    I can understand how Robert is confused only having a very high level understanding of programming and technology though.

    I would suggest he buy a little AVR starter kit:
    http://www.smileymicros.com/
    and
    http://www.avrfreaks.net/

    for further info. Once he does the little “kid level” kit, his posts will snap into correctness. It’s worth it Scoble.

  11. “This is a bummer, because .NET is a lot easier to write than C++ and letting Microsoft’s developers write .NET code for Windows would unleash a bunch of innovation.”

    I’m pretty sure the core of Windows is C there Robert, not C++. You see, even C++ is not performant enough to write schedulers and low level IO.
    .NET makes writing very high level apps easy, it does not make writing system code easy at all. It makes it harder.
    Where you could just manipulate memory, now you have to go through several levels of indirection with .NET or Java.

    I can understand how Robert is confused only having a very high level understanding of programming and technology though.

    I would suggest he buy a little AVR starter kit:
    http://www.smileymicros.com/
    and
    http://www.avrfreaks.net/

    for further info. Once he does the little “kid level” kit, his posts will snap into correctness. It’s worth it Scoble.

  12. There are plenty of reasons to encourage .NET for reasons within the Windows ecosystem, that have nothing to do with competitors to Windows that Microsoft is ‘trying to destroy’. One thing is .NET code is safer than what the average programmer would do, one is that if all major applications are on a virtual layer with .NET it will be easier to change the core of Windows without breaking things, one is that they can encourage different practices, including like parallel computing, by building .NET libraries around it, one is that it makes the system potentially more object-oriented and accessible to object-oriented systems, one is that there are advantages to WPF and other WinFX pillars that will make more attractive applications for Windows,… well, so, the point is people who hate Microsoft assume that there’s no reason at all to have a coherent, integrated desktop platform, and any attempt to promote it is really on an ulterior level an attempt to destroy competitors because of proprietary tie-in. Sorry, Microsoft-haters, you really don’t have the whole story.

  13. There are plenty of reasons to encourage .NET for reasons within the Windows ecosystem, that have nothing to do with competitors to Windows that Microsoft is ‘trying to destroy’. One thing is .NET code is safer than what the average programmer would do, one is that if all major applications are on a virtual layer with .NET it will be easier to change the core of Windows without breaking things, one is that they can encourage different practices, including like parallel computing, by building .NET libraries around it, one is that it makes the system potentially more object-oriented and accessible to object-oriented systems, one is that there are advantages to WPF and other WinFX pillars that will make more attractive applications for Windows,… well, so, the point is people who hate Microsoft assume that there’s no reason at all to have a coherent, integrated desktop platform, and any attempt to promote it is really on an ulterior level an attempt to destroy competitors because of proprietary tie-in. Sorry, Microsoft-haters, you really don’t have the whole story.

  14. “Now that Google, Amazon, Apple, are shipping platforms that are more and more interesting to Microsoft’s developer community Microsoft has to play a different game.”

    This year, palmtop PC (UMPC) will become a real big business.
    I think Microsofts developer community should focus on this platform!
    We will really need palmtop-aware applications. :)
    http://www.itmedia.co.jp/news/articles/0705/16/news043.html

  15. “Now that Google, Amazon, Apple, are shipping platforms that are more and more interesting to Microsoft’s developer community Microsoft has to play a different game.”

    This year, palmtop PC (UMPC) will become a real big business.
    I think Microsofts developer community should focus on this platform!
    We will really need palmtop-aware applications. :)
    http://www.itmedia.co.jp/news/articles/0705/16/news043.html

  16. Scoble, I don’t doubt you, I’m just saying it is possible for windows to do the same, I guess it depends on the hardware. I’ll be swapping out my G4 Mac for a MacBook soonish, so I can see the difference then.

    Re: your channel 9 work. That was the reason I started going there, I really enjoyed your videos, and I enjoy your podtech videos too. Given the fact that was the main content on the site, I think your surveys were right ;)

    Would be nice to see some more discussions like the Vista/OSX video you did earlier in the year – I really enjoyed that.

  17. Scoble, I don’t doubt you, I’m just saying it is possible for windows to do the same, I guess it depends on the hardware. I’ll be swapping out my G4 Mac for a MacBook soonish, so I can see the difference then.

    Re: your channel 9 work. That was the reason I started going there, I really enjoyed your videos, and I enjoy your podtech videos too. Given the fact that was the main content on the site, I think your surveys were right ;)

    Would be nice to see some more discussions like the Vista/OSX video you did earlier in the year – I really enjoyed that.

  18. #64: congrats on getting a machine that wakes up so fast. I’ve seen dozens of Windows machines and most don’t wake up that fast.

    Regarding Channel 9. That’s not what people told us in the surveys that we did! But, interesting how the revisionists go back and make everything I did seem like shit. That’s cool. I guess if I was in the Microsoft ecosystem right now I’d be doing the same thing. Discredit Scoble’s work back then, cause that way we can discredit anything he says now.

    I understand how this game is played.

  19. #64: congrats on getting a machine that wakes up so fast. I’ve seen dozens of Windows machines and most don’t wake up that fast.

    Regarding Channel 9. That’s not what people told us in the surveys that we did! But, interesting how the revisionists go back and make everything I did seem like shit. That’s cool. I guess if I was in the Microsoft ecosystem right now I’d be doing the same thing. Discredit Scoble’s work back then, cause that way we can discredit anything he says now.

    I understand how this game is played.

  20. @63 – given you’re such a tech genius, I’m surprised you haven’t considered it could be the HARDWARE that is slow to wake up? My Dell takes less than a second.

    But I’m sure you’ll pull out some self-created stat to justify your all-knowingness. Just cos c9 had a bunch of hits in the early days is NOT a validation of the technical content level or quality. It’s probably all the moms you were asking questions for :-)

  21. @63 – given you’re such a tech genius, I’m surprised you haven’t considered it could be the HARDWARE that is slow to wake up? My Dell takes less than a second.

    But I’m sure you’ll pull out some self-created stat to justify your all-knowingness. Just cos c9 had a bunch of hits in the early days is NOT a validation of the technical content level or quality. It’s probably all the moms you were asking questions for :-)

  22. Will: well, I have a dual-core Sony Vaio which takes several seconds to get out of sleep mode while my new Mac gets out of sleep mode almost instantly. Maybe I should video tape the two coming out of sleep mode so you can see how much faster the Mac is.

  23. Will: well, I have a dual-core Sony Vaio which takes several seconds to get out of sleep mode while my new Mac gets out of sleep mode almost instantly. Maybe I should video tape the two coming out of sleep mode so you can see how much faster the Mac is.

  24. Scoble, RE: #44.

    My vista machine boots out of sleep mode before my monitor has an image on the screen, you can’t get much faster than that!

    I guess OSX’s speed is due to a few things, firstly the limited range of hardware it has to support would mean apple can tweak for that exact hardware and leave out everything else.
    Secondly, before the Intel switch the G4/G5 cpus meant that Apple *had* to optimize their software, whilst the PC camp was enjoying ever higher clock speeds and overall faster CPU’s so it was less of an issue – windows got faster by default.

  25. Scoble, RE: #44.

    My vista machine boots out of sleep mode before my monitor has an image on the screen, you can’t get much faster than that!

    I guess OSX’s speed is due to a few things, firstly the limited range of hardware it has to support would mean apple can tweak for that exact hardware and leave out everything else.
    Secondly, before the Intel switch the G4/G5 cpus meant that Apple *had* to optimize their software, whilst the PC camp was enjoying ever higher clock speeds and overall faster CPU’s so it was less of an issue – windows got faster by default.

  26. #59: fair enough. So, tell me, how much has Channel 9′s traffic gone up since I left? Compare that to the growth in traffic of ScobleShow.com. I have and ScobleShow has been growing a LOT faster and is quickly moving up the ranks of the Technorati list. ScobleShow reached top 2,000 blogs faster than Channel 9 did and Channel 9 had fewer blogs to compete against.

  27. #59: fair enough. So, tell me, how much has Channel 9′s traffic gone up since I left? Compare that to the growth in traffic of ScobleShow.com. I have and ScobleShow has been growing a LOT faster and is quickly moving up the ranks of the Technorati list. ScobleShow reached top 2,000 blogs faster than Channel 9 did and Channel 9 had fewer blogs to compete against.

  28. “there are large portions of Vista that WERE rewritten from scratch. The audio stack, for instance. Same with the networking stack.”

    Neither of which are candidates (nor examples of candidates) to be written on top of .NET. Corresponding .NET-provided services would be written on top of them instead. .NET is a high level framework, much of which sits on top of lowerlevel stuff (e.g. .NET’s internet transport api sits on top of wininet.dll).

    “Yet the management forbade any team from working with .NET. Why? Because working on top of .NET would build dependencies on another team inside Microsoft.
    Also because .NET’s performance simply wasn’t up to the task.”

    Well, at least the “dependencies” thing is true. Yes, the main problem with Vista’s delays was that lots of code was being written against other code (e.g. .NET 3.0) that was still in development, which resulted in code being checked in with no testing, leading to instable development process. The “reset” removed lots of these dependencies, many of which where .NET dependencies.

  29. “there are large portions of Vista that WERE rewritten from scratch. The audio stack, for instance. Same with the networking stack.”

    Neither of which are candidates (nor examples of candidates) to be written on top of .NET. Corresponding .NET-provided services would be written on top of them instead. .NET is a high level framework, much of which sits on top of lowerlevel stuff (e.g. .NET’s internet transport api sits on top of wininet.dll).

    “Yet the management forbade any team from working with .NET. Why? Because working on top of .NET would build dependencies on another team inside Microsoft.
    Also because .NET’s performance simply wasn’t up to the task.”

    Well, at least the “dependencies” thing is true. Yes, the main problem with Vista’s delays was that lots of code was being written against other code (e.g. .NET 3.0) that was still in development, which resulted in code being checked in with no testing, leading to instable development process. The “reset” removed lots of these dependencies, many of which where .NET dependencies.

  30. @57 “don’t remember anyone complaining about our technical depth before I left Microsoft but now you are here saying it wasn’t deep enough.”

    Uh…maybe because you were the only bar to be measured against? Lots of people thought the special effects in Star Wars in ’77 were cool, too. But compared to today? They sucked. Sort of the same thing. The tech content of your videos at Channel9 vs today’s Channel9? Well, I think Mr. Balder has a valid point.

  31. @57 “don’t remember anyone complaining about our technical depth before I left Microsoft but now you are here saying it wasn’t deep enough.”

    Uh…maybe because you were the only bar to be measured against? Lots of people thought the special effects in Star Wars in ’77 were cool, too. But compared to today? They sucked. Sort of the same thing. The tech content of your videos at Channel9 vs today’s Channel9? Well, I think Mr. Balder has a valid point.

  32. Kenny: there are large portions of Vista that WERE rewritten from scratch. The audio stack, for instance. Same with the networking stack. Yet the management forbade any team from working with .NET. Why? Because working on top of .NET would build dependencies on another team inside Microsoft. Also because .NET’s performance simply wasn’t up to the task.

  33. Kenny: there are large portions of Vista that WERE rewritten from scratch. The audio stack, for instance. Same with the networking stack. Yet the management forbade any team from working with .NET. Why? Because working on top of .NET would build dependencies on another team inside Microsoft. Also because .NET’s performance simply wasn’t up to the task.

  34. Dave: I was at Mix07 and watched the keynote. The Scott Guthrie part was excellent.
    I see you’re here just to throw insults my way. Congrats. Interesting that Channel 9 was built to 4.3 million unique visitors when I was doing videos at Channel 9 (I did most of the first 600 videos on Channel 9) and I don’t remember anyone complaining about our technical depth before I left Microsoft but now you are here saying it wasn’t deep enough. Sounds like sour grapes to me. You can’t complain about something two years after the fact and have any credibility.
    You’re a genius coder. Now go add something to Windows that we’ll all care about. Thanks.

  35. Dave: I was at Mix07 and watched the keynote. The Scott Guthrie part was excellent.
    I see you’re here just to throw insults my way. Congrats. Interesting that Channel 9 was built to 4.3 million unique visitors when I was doing videos at Channel 9 (I did most of the first 600 videos on Channel 9) and I don’t remember anyone complaining about our technical depth before I left Microsoft but now you are here saying it wasn’t deep enough. Sounds like sour grapes to me. You can’t complain about something two years after the fact and have any credibility.
    You’re a genius coder. Now go add something to Windows that we’ll all care about. Thanks.

  36. From my personal experience, .NET isn’t so slow that it would preclude loading it at boot time.

    I don’t have Vista, but I have XP with .NET 3.0 installed. Besides my own little side projects, the three .NET apps that I use regularly are Paint.NET, PowerShell, and XPS Viewer EP. Loading any of these before .NET has been loaded does take some time (8 seconds at the most). But once that’s done, loading any of them afterward takes little time, so you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference from a native app. But I have a relatively fast machine.

    Windows does take a long time to come out of sleep mode compared to OSX, but that has nothing to do with .NET. Windows XP is slow coming out of sleep mode even with no .NET libs installed at all.

    The reason Vista isn’t written in .NET is that Vista wasn’t rewritten from scratch. It has tons of old NT code in there (and rightly so; no need to change it other than recompiling it with the stack-checking flag).

    I’m not sure what any of this has to do with PDC’s postponment, BTW.

  37. From my personal experience, .NET isn’t so slow that it would preclude loading it at boot time.

    I don’t have Vista, but I have XP with .NET 3.0 installed. Besides my own little side projects, the three .NET apps that I use regularly are Paint.NET, PowerShell, and XPS Viewer EP. Loading any of these before .NET has been loaded does take some time (8 seconds at the most). But once that’s done, loading any of them afterward takes little time, so you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference from a native app. But I have a relatively fast machine.

    Windows does take a long time to come out of sleep mode compared to OSX, but that has nothing to do with .NET. Windows XP is slow coming out of sleep mode even with no .NET libs installed at all.

    The reason Vista isn’t written in .NET is that Vista wasn’t rewritten from scratch. It has tons of old NT code in there (and rightly so; no need to change it other than recompiling it with the stack-checking flag).

    I’m not sure what any of this has to do with PDC’s postponment, BTW.

  38. “Not even the games were written in .NET.”

    WTF?!?!?! What kind of excuse do they have for *this* one?

    ——-

    This is so tired. They don’t need an *excuse*. Why rewrite mindsweeper (for example) in .NET if they can leave the core as it is and just pretty-up the graphics?

    You don’t rewrite things just to rewrite them. For years, OSX’s Finder wasn’t written on top of Cocoa’s API. Did that mean that Cocoa sucked?

    Expression is written in .NET. That should be evidence enough that new apps are being written in .NET. Rewriting older apps like mindsweeper for no reason is stupid.

  39. “Not even the games were written in .NET.”

    WTF?!?!?! What kind of excuse do they have for *this* one?

    ——-

    This is so tired. They don’t need an *excuse*. Why rewrite mindsweeper (for example) in .NET if they can leave the core as it is and just pretty-up the graphics?

    You don’t rewrite things just to rewrite them. For years, OSX’s Finder wasn’t written on top of Cocoa’s API. Did that mean that Cocoa sucked?

    Expression is written in .NET. That should be evidence enough that new apps are being written in .NET. Rewriting older apps like mindsweeper for no reason is stupid.

  40. “You’ve got to be kidding if you think the keynote with Mike Arrington and Ray Ozzie at Mix07 was any more developer focused than what Steve Jobs does at the WWDC.”

    Scoble, have you even bothered to watch the Mix07 keynote, which was mainly mc’ed by Scott Gutthrie, not Ozzie or Arrington. During the keynote, someone demoed actually creating and debugging a solution from start to finish. When has a WWDC *ever* showed debugging as part of a keynote? WWDCs are about, “look at this new Leopard feature!” nonsense that devs really don’t care about.

    “I’ve heard the .NET startup time problem from a range of developers across Microsoft’s Windows team. It isn’t a big deal to wait for Silverlight to startup, but it IS a huge deal to delay Windows starting up by a few seconds.”

    This is absurd. My own .NET apps start within 5 seconds if .NET hasn’t been loaded yet, and start instantaneously if it has been. And this has zero to do with waking from sleep mode. From where do you obtain your tech knowledge?

    And yes, I do know that you did LINQ interviews at Channel9. That doesn’t mean you actually know anything about the tech. Most of your questions are of the “how does this help my mom?” type. Here’s a clue: Go watch one of your old Channel9 vids or one of your current PodTech vids, then immediately watch one of Rory’s Channel9 vids. You will see at once which interviewer has tech knowledge and which does not. Not that your interviews aren’t without merit, but they simply are not about technical details. So you can’t point to them as evidence that you actually know what you’re talking about at a technical level.

    Again, your whole point was that postponing PDC meant that Microsoft has nothing coming for developers this year when Orcas is on its way. Your entire premise is BS.

  41. “You’ve got to be kidding if you think the keynote with Mike Arrington and Ray Ozzie at Mix07 was any more developer focused than what Steve Jobs does at the WWDC.”

    Scoble, have you even bothered to watch the Mix07 keynote, which was mainly mc’ed by Scott Gutthrie, not Ozzie or Arrington. During the keynote, someone demoed actually creating and debugging a solution from start to finish. When has a WWDC *ever* showed debugging as part of a keynote? WWDCs are about, “look at this new Leopard feature!” nonsense that devs really don’t care about.

    “I’ve heard the .NET startup time problem from a range of developers across Microsoft’s Windows team. It isn’t a big deal to wait for Silverlight to startup, but it IS a huge deal to delay Windows starting up by a few seconds.”

    This is absurd. My own .NET apps start within 5 seconds if .NET hasn’t been loaded yet, and start instantaneously if it has been. And this has zero to do with waking from sleep mode. From where do you obtain your tech knowledge?

    And yes, I do know that you did LINQ interviews at Channel9. That doesn’t mean you actually know anything about the tech. Most of your questions are of the “how does this help my mom?” type. Here’s a clue: Go watch one of your old Channel9 vids or one of your current PodTech vids, then immediately watch one of Rory’s Channel9 vids. You will see at once which interviewer has tech knowledge and which does not. Not that your interviews aren’t without merit, but they simply are not about technical details. So you can’t point to them as evidence that you actually know what you’re talking about at a technical level.

    Again, your whole point was that postponing PDC meant that Microsoft has nothing coming for developers this year when Orcas is on its way. Your entire premise is BS.

  42. that they don’t have enough “new” stuff to talk about.

    Oh they have tons to TALK about, delivery is another matter, too early in the hype spin cycle and I don’t think they want a PDC 2003 repeat.

  43. that they don’t have enough “new” stuff to talk about.

    Oh they have tons to TALK about, delivery is another matter, too early in the hype spin cycle and I don’t think they want a PDC 2003 repeat.

  44. .net does start up slowly, go browse some .net 1.1 web apps that have been sitting idle (no activity) for more then 20 minutes. my old vb com with asp beats that stuff with no startup wait and no configuration changes to make it go faster. why is that?

  45. .net does start up slowly, go browse some .net 1.1 web apps that have been sitting idle (no activity) for more then 20 minutes. my old vb com with asp beats that stuff with no startup wait and no configuration changes to make it go faster. why is that?

  46. “Not even the games were written in .NET.”

    WTF?!?!?! What kind of excuse do they have for *this* one?

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