Inside the Gears of Google

So, what did Google just do with its introduction of “Gears?”

Setup its suite of office applications to go offline. Oh, and everyone else’s too.

Zojo? ConceptShare? Zimbra?

All will be able to go offline soon if their developers adopt Google’s Gears.

UPDATE: David Berlind at ZDNet has the best insight I’ve seen posted so far about Gears and has a podcast/interview with Linus Upson, director of engineering at Google

Right now I’m using my computer while not connected to the Internet. I’m typing in Windows Live Writer’s window and I’m surfing Google Reader while unconnected.

Some things that work better? Google Reader doesn’t hesitate or “stutter” every 20 posts like it does when it’s online. Some things that don’t work as well? It doesn’t download images so posts have grey boxes in them.

I just reconnected and it instantly shared all the items I had maked as shared.

Nice implementation and works simply and easily. I’ll definitely be using this on my next plane ride.

I wish it ALWAYS worked in offline mode, though. Why do I need to click a button to resubscribe? The Gears team told me this is a choice the developer will need to make.

Oh, while offline, if I reloaded my browser, or accidentally closed it, it goes back to my Reader automatically. That’s nice.

Look for more offline applications to come from Google soon. They don’t have any to announce yet, but said they are working on their Docs and Spreadsheets.

What really just happened? The Web got a little further away from Microsoft’s platforms and Google revealed a little more about its platform dreams.

What do you think? Are you looking forward to developing an app using Gears?

59 thoughts on “Inside the Gears of Google

  1. I wonder what Google Gears has to do with Google OS.

    There is no tie, dependency whatsoever with what Google has in their data centers.

    Anyway, it’s typical Scoble.

  2. I wonder what Google Gears has to do with Google OS.

    There is no tie, dependency whatsoever with what Google has in their data centers.

    Anyway, it’s typical Scoble.

  3. um yeah, sorry about not following up on my comment. I usually remember to!

    The only restriction you’ll find with FeedDemon vs Google Reader is that the river of news view is per-folder (so you’ll have to put all your feeds into one folder). I’m sure fixing that is on Nick’s list though, because I logged a feature request for it ;)

  4. um yeah, sorry about not following up on my comment. I usually remember to!

    The only restriction you’ll find with FeedDemon vs Google Reader is that the river of news view is per-folder (so you’ll have to put all your feeds into one folder). I’m sure fixing that is on Nick’s list though, because I logged a feature request for it ;)

  5. To add to Nick Bradbury’s comment about creating link blogs with FeedDemon…

    You can create a link blog with almost any NewsGator client. I’ve added support for this in Inbox, the NewsGator Toolbar and in NewsGator Desktop. NewsGator Online can also do this.

    It’s all done using NewsGator Clippings – I wrote a post about it on my blog a few months ago:

    http://blogs.newsgator.com/inbox/2007/03/clippings_anoth.html

    Since NewsGator Online is the backbone for all these clients, things you clip in one sync with the others so you can use any or all to build a link blog.

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