Going to VMware today

Later today I’m going to VMware to hear the latest about virtualization technology. What would you like to ask them?

Me? I’m going to ask how they compare to Parallels, the virtualization technology that I’m running on my MacBookPro (it lets me use Windows Vista). A new version of Parallels was released today. Web Worker Daily reports on that.

67 thoughts on “Going to VMware today

  1. “how they compare to Parallels”

    Like Wordpad to Word. Parallels doesn’t compare at all.

  2. “how they compare to Parallels”

    Like Wordpad to Word. Parallels doesn’t compare at all.

  3. What interests me is the ability to deploy virtual machines to a portable device that can be booted anywhere and will create a secure tunnel back to base.

    Just imagine being able to take your desktop wherever you go, in your pocket. Just run it from whatever hardware is around, and it connects back to the office. Administrative control over the access to the rest of the desktop to control what can be done with it.

    I’d also love to talk about a Hypervisor that can support HIDS or or HIPS. Move the security added value into the hypervisor to prevent malware running in the VMs.

    Andy

  4. What interests me is the ability to deploy virtual machines to a portable device that can be booted anywhere and will create a secure tunnel back to base.

    Just imagine being able to take your desktop wherever you go, in your pocket. Just run it from whatever hardware is around, and it connects back to the office. Administrative control over the access to the rest of the desktop to control what can be done with it.

    I’d also love to talk about a Hypervisor that can support HIDS or or HIPS. Move the security added value into the hypervisor to prevent malware running in the VMs.

    Andy

  5. PS – Trying to cover the Enterprise space, from a Valley start-up kick ain’t gonna work. Journalistically bone up. Asking the Parallels question will forever mark you as an “everyman Walt Mossbergish drama-queen” lightweight. Give unto consumers, the things that are consumerish, and unto the Enterprise things that are Enterpriseish.

  6. PS – Trying to cover the Enterprise space, from a Valley start-up kick ain’t gonna work. Journalistically bone up. Asking the Parallels question will forever mark you as an “everyman Walt Mossbergish drama-queen” lightweight. Give unto consumers, the things that are consumerish, and unto the Enterprise things that are Enterpriseish.

  7. step out of the echo chamber once in awhile

    Great post. But a lost cause…the echo chamber is where all the excitement, parties, conferences, jet-setting and shaky-boring cam interviews with start-up CEOs (that hate Dreamhost) happen. The fun buzz before reality…

    Soooo watcha think of Power 5 and Power 6? (Nice opening…). Heh.

    I’d ask about the Virtual Iron catfights…oh fun fun. :) VI going HP ProLiant Partner Program, hah, hah. What does VMWare think of Mike Grandinetti’s smack downs? And what of Diane Greene’s pushback per integrating virtualization into the OS. I can spec geek out too, but hey, catfight drama is NEWS. Boxing match material there, as VMWare prices are a BIG issue.

    Also amazing that Microsoft went SoftGrid only as function of MDOP per SA maintenance contracts. And where be Viridian? Another Microsoft forever forthcoming staller, that will be half of what promised. Hit on that. Dig up some Microsoft slams if you can.

    And you can talk about the new ACE 2 Enterprise, and Pocket ACE. And about strategic overall approaches over just servers, per software, storage and networking.

    Microsoft, XenSource, Virtual Iron, SWsoft (and umm ok, maybe Parallels) are but trailing VMWare, that may change, but the economic pie will only grow, so it may not be at the expense of VMWare. But rubber meets road time…Xen won’t meet VMWare for awhile, but pricing factors in it’s favor and given time, might catch up.

    (Oh wait you already went, well right next door…)

  8. step out of the echo chamber once in awhile

    Great post. But a lost cause…the echo chamber is where all the excitement, parties, conferences, jet-setting and shaky-boring cam interviews with start-up CEOs (that hate Dreamhost) happen. The fun buzz before reality…

    Soooo watcha think of Power 5 and Power 6? (Nice opening…). Heh.

    I’d ask about the Virtual Iron catfights…oh fun fun. :) VI going HP ProLiant Partner Program, hah, hah. What does VMWare think of Mike Grandinetti’s smack downs? And what of Diane Greene’s pushback per integrating virtualization into the OS. I can spec geek out too, but hey, catfight drama is NEWS. Boxing match material there, as VMWare prices are a BIG issue.

    Also amazing that Microsoft went SoftGrid only as function of MDOP per SA maintenance contracts. And where be Viridian? Another Microsoft forever forthcoming staller, that will be half of what promised. Hit on that. Dig up some Microsoft slams if you can.

    And you can talk about the new ACE 2 Enterprise, and Pocket ACE. And about strategic overall approaches over just servers, per software, storage and networking.

    Microsoft, XenSource, Virtual Iron, SWsoft (and umm ok, maybe Parallels) are but trailing VMWare, that may change, but the economic pie will only grow, so it may not be at the expense of VMWare. But rubber meets road time…Xen won’t meet VMWare for awhile, but pricing factors in it’s favor and given time, might catch up.

    (Oh wait you already went, well right next door…)

  9. I would ask them if they are making improvements to VMware-player so that it’s performance will be more competitive with VirtualBox and Qemu. I would show them the following benchmarks from this testing (scroll down for “Benchmark” and “Conclusions”…

    http://www.linux-gamers.net/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=56

    “Conclusions:

    VMware-Player does not seem to be that good and no real competitor to Virtualbox or Qemu after this benchmark and the Windows system running in the VMware-player didn’t feel very smooth at all. That might be different, when the guest drivers are installed, but seems like they are only available with the commercial product.”

  10. I would ask them if they are making improvements to VMware-player so that it’s performance will be more competitive with VirtualBox and Qemu. I would show them the following benchmarks from this testing (scroll down for “Benchmark” and “Conclusions”…

    http://www.linux-gamers.net/modules/smartsection/item.php?itemid=56

    “Conclusions:

    VMware-Player does not seem to be that good and no real competitor to Virtualbox or Qemu after this benchmark and the Windows system running in the VMware-player didn’t feel very smooth at all. That might be different, when the guest drivers are installed, but seems like they are only available with the commercial product.”

  11. #23 – elitist ?!?! Far from it. I’m not advocating preventing anyone from running VMs on their laptop, I’m just commenting on it’s practicallity. Outside of our “echo chamber” running multiple OS concurrently within one host while that host runs another OS is an incredilby esoteric and expensive exercise that only appeals to small market. Mass deployments are impractical because IT shops have to worry about not only manitining a host OS but also a guest OS. It’s a niche market and once you are talking about Mac hosts the market becomes even smaller, it’s not meant as a dig it’s just reality. A more interesing question would be when is Apple going to let us VM OS X instances.
    Like I said, show me something like WINE running Windows apps without virtulization or hardware emulation and you got me, until then it’s just not practical to me.

  12. #23 – elitist ?!?! Far from it. I’m not advocating preventing anyone from running VMs on their laptop, I’m just commenting on it’s practicallity. Outside of our “echo chamber” running multiple OS concurrently within one host while that host runs another OS is an incredilby esoteric and expensive exercise that only appeals to small market. Mass deployments are impractical because IT shops have to worry about not only manitining a host OS but also a guest OS. It’s a niche market and once you are talking about Mac hosts the market becomes even smaller, it’s not meant as a dig it’s just reality. A more interesing question would be when is Apple going to let us VM OS X instances.
    Like I said, show me something like WINE running Windows apps without virtulization or hardware emulation and you got me, until then it’s just not practical to me.

  13. Robert,

    For your typical audience (desktop/laptop users) it is a good line of questioning to ask VMware about their strategies for fighting off Open Source and low cost competitors.

    Currently, I think they give away free versions to encourage IT people to test the software and get excited about buying the larger versions (ESX Server for DataCenter uses).

    On the Enterprise level VMware (for me) boils down to 3 C’s: Containers, Concurrency and Cloning.

    Container:
    Any x86 system (MS, Linux, Solaris) can be treated as a container with VMware. The container can be as simple as two files on a storage device (metadata and a file that emulates C: for example).

    Concurrency:
    An ESX server (using a custom Linux host OS) can run many containers on one large server. If you manage 400 PC servers you’d like to consider buying 100 large servers to run 400 container iamges and be able to add containers where there is excess hardware capacity and save money and support headaches.

    If hardware fails VMware can re-start containers on another ESX server.

    Cloning:
    Copy the container files across the WAN and you get Disaster Recovery without a lot of details headaches.

    VMware is pushing all three of these concepts to DataCenter Enterprise requirements and increasing availability, DR and reducing “Total Cost of Ownership”.

    So, questions the VMware might be worried about:
    1) Will MS show up with patent demands around the Linux that makes ESX so profitable? It would be very easy to get them in court and work out a license agreement. VMware might like to stop the Open Source VM’s from getting Enterprise uptake.

    2. Does large vendor virtualization concern them (IBM, HP, Sun)? I’d guess not because like EMC they speak well with all those vendors equipment if x86 is the standard for the datacenter. But, they will drive price pressure.

    3. Are they working independently from their owners EMC? I think they are otherwise it would tip the Enterprise to another storage neutral solution. If the Open Source VM’s get robust fast the competition will be like MS facing down Linux. A long slow erosion that limits “wall street” expectations for growth. They start to stall.

    I hope I’m not too late to influence the conversation but I did want to document my take on VMware and others may comment based upon real experience with the products.

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