Um, Apple, Nokia N95 has Wifi

I just saw this comparison, done by Apple, which says that the Nokia N95 doesn’t have Wifi. That’s wrong. My Nokia N95 has Wifi built in and works quite well. It’s interesting what this chart doesn’t point out too. Things missing include:

1. Replaceable battery.
2. Swapable SIM card capability (unlocked, use with any carrier).
3. GPS.
4. Quad band with 3G capability.
5. Keyboard you can use without looking at the phone.
6. Java application compatibility.
7. .NET application compatibility.
8. Flash application compatibility.
9. Offline internet connected applications.

Of course Apple wouldn’t point THOSE out because they are not things the iPhone can do.

UPDATE: Apple updated its chart to fix the Nokia error.

140 thoughts on “Um, Apple, Nokia N95 has Wifi

  1. Pingback: thinks
  2. Marketing strategy. yes. they’re good at it.

    It’s just hot. for the moment – the design is superb, minimalistic, yet clean looking.

    Also the other key features:
    The water-drip effect.
    The touch screen.
    the touch screen again. (for resizing pics)

    these are not common.

  3. Marketing strategy. yes. they’re good at it.

    It’s just hot. for the moment – the design is superb, minimalistic, yet clean looking.

    Also the other key features:
    The water-drip effect.
    The touch screen.
    the touch screen again. (for resizing pics)

    these are not common.

  4. Alan, not sure what you mean by the phone cannot use the 5MP camera. The camera works very well for small point & shoot – check out all the photos on Flickr taken with N95s. The shutter is actually not slow at all: the original firmware had a bug (although they didn’t call it that) that meant the shutter sound effect didn’t get played until after the image was stored on the memory card, making it seem slow. The upgraded firmware fixes this.

    The GPS is slow to acquire at first, but once it is locked it updates continually and works as well as any GPS. There is also a rumour that the next release will contain an upgrade to include AGPS which will speed up the initial lock.

    If you want to automatically geotag your photos (which I’m guessing you do giving the application), then you’ll need to use ShoZu to upload them. You can upload over Wi-Fi or the cellular data network. If you plan to use hotspots, you might want to try Devicescape too which makes it simpler to get signed on at public hotspots).

    HTH,
    John…

  5. Alan, not sure what you mean by the phone cannot use the 5MP camera. The camera works very well for small point & shoot – check out all the photos on Flickr taken with N95s. The shutter is actually not slow at all: the original firmware had a bug (although they didn’t call it that) that meant the shutter sound effect didn’t get played until after the image was stored on the memory card, making it seem slow. The upgraded firmware fixes this.

    The GPS is slow to acquire at first, but once it is locked it updates continually and works as well as any GPS. There is also a rumour that the next release will contain an upgrade to include AGPS which will speed up the initial lock.

    If you want to automatically geotag your photos (which I’m guessing you do giving the application), then you’ll need to use ShoZu to upload them. You can upload over Wi-Fi or the cellular data network. If you plan to use hotspots, you might want to try Devicescape too which makes it simpler to get signed on at public hotspots).

    HTH,
    John…

  6. Alan, you can still use a HTC Trinity or O2 something or Telekom XDA … they are all the same (Pocket PC phone with a GPS chip), and nearly all decent mobile telephony standards (well I am using one currently to type the message). The device has 2 cameras (1 for video call (300×200 or so)) and the one in the back is a 2MP.

    To answer your question concerning the GPS, I tried severals based on Windows CE, they all need couple of seconds/minutes to locate where you are when you turn them on. But once you are located, and the device remains on, it will be instantaneous, and your position will be correct (with margins due to civilian GPS, since military ones are more accurate).

  7. Alan, you can still use a HTC Trinity or O2 something or Telekom XDA … they are all the same (Pocket PC phone with a GPS chip), and nearly all decent mobile telephony standards (well I am using one currently to type the message). The device has 2 cameras (1 for video call (300×200 or so)) and the one in the back is a 2MP.

    To answer your question concerning the GPS, I tried severals based on Windows CE, they all need couple of seconds/minutes to locate where you are when you turn them on. But once you are located, and the device remains on, it will be instantaneous, and your position will be correct (with margins due to civilian GPS, since military ones are more accurate).

  8. I’d really like some direction on how to cut through the FUD. The nonprofit that I work for wants to create a photo map of a destroyed New Orleans neighborhood to aid in recovery. The Nokia N95 looks like the right tool, but I’ve been told…

    * GPS is very slow, takes a minute to locate.
    * 5mp is no big deal, phone cannot use it.
    * Shutter is very slow.

    What’s the truth? What’s the FUD? Should I buy a camera and GPS system and forget about having the Internet?

  9. I’d really like some direction on how to cut through the FUD. The nonprofit that I work for wants to create a photo map of a destroyed New Orleans neighborhood to aid in recovery. The Nokia N95 looks like the right tool, but I’ve been told…

    * GPS is very slow, takes a minute to locate.
    * 5mp is no big deal, phone cannot use it.
    * Shutter is very slow.

    What’s the truth? What’s the FUD? Should I buy a camera and GPS system and forget about having the Internet?

  10. This is very useful, but which one wins out? I’m an new apple owner and by virtue of that a convert. Everyone keeps telling me that the first generation iphone is not going to be what everyone would like it to be and I’m not feeling the Nokia N95. Can someone put me straight on this.

  11. This is very useful, but which one wins out? I’m an new apple owner and by virtue of that a convert. Everyone keeps telling me that the first generation iphone is not going to be what everyone would like it to be and I’m not feeling the Nokia N95. Can someone put me straight on this.

  12. @LayZ

    The difference between 2MP and 5MP is significant.

    Example 1:
    With 2MP you can take pictures of A4-sized documents and if the font is big enough, the text is (barely) readable on your screen. But with 5MP you can shoot larger documents with smaller font or even make decent prints.

    Example 2:
    My screen’s resolution is now 1600×1200, 2MP pictures fits there nicely 1:1 but how about in the future?

  13. @LayZ

    The difference between 2MP and 5MP is significant.

    Example 1:
    With 2MP you can take pictures of A4-sized documents and if the font is big enough, the text is (barely) readable on your screen. But with 5MP you can shoot larger documents with smaller font or even make decent prints.

    Example 2:
    My screen’s resolution is now 1600×1200, 2MP pictures fits there nicely 1:1 but how about in the future?

  14. @47 “And, sorry, if all things are equal having more megapixels DOES matter.”

    Matters how? Quality of picture? If you really believe that, I feel sorry for any customer you sold a camera to when you worked in a camera store. All things being equal it absolutely does NOT matter. You can only cram so many pixels into a sensor that will fit in a camera phone. Now, a 5MB DSLR will produce better quality photos than a 5MB camera phone. Care to guess why? The difference between 2MB and 5MB for the phone form factor does NOT matter. You will absolutely NOT see a difference in the quality of the picture taken and displayed on an N95 and one taken and displayed on an iPhone.

    Now, if we are talking about cropping and editing, then yes it does have some minor advantages to go with more pixels. But I rather doubt the majority of users of these devices will be doing much of that.

    You’re falling into that typical geek myth that between two items the item that has the bigger number must be better. Next you are going to tell me you see the difference between 1080i and 1080p on a 32″ screen.

  15. @47 “And, sorry, if all things are equal having more megapixels DOES matter.”

    Matters how? Quality of picture? If you really believe that, I feel sorry for any customer you sold a camera to when you worked in a camera store. All things being equal it absolutely does NOT matter. You can only cram so many pixels into a sensor that will fit in a camera phone. Now, a 5MB DSLR will produce better quality photos than a 5MB camera phone. Care to guess why? The difference between 2MB and 5MB for the phone form factor does NOT matter. You will absolutely NOT see a difference in the quality of the picture taken and displayed on an N95 and one taken and displayed on an iPhone.

    Now, if we are talking about cropping and editing, then yes it does have some minor advantages to go with more pixels. But I rather doubt the majority of users of these devices will be doing much of that.

    You’re falling into that typical geek myth that between two items the item that has the bigger number must be better. Next you are going to tell me you see the difference between 1080i and 1080p on a 32″ screen.

  16. Hum… Do you really think a company will fairly compare other manufacturers’products with its owns? As long as they put true datas.
    But I am surprised to not see any HTC Trinity or Hermes (which can be compared but for which hdd is lacking), or even the HTC Touch/Elf.

  17. Hum… Do you really think a company will fairly compare other manufacturers’products with its owns? As long as they put true datas.
    But I am surprised to not see any HTC Trinity or Hermes (which can be compared but for which hdd is lacking), or even the HTC Touch/Elf.

  18. Tim Snyder: “I dont think you got the point. The point here is that Apple’s chart omits these details.”

    No, I’d say you don’t get the point. I’ve never seen a single comparison chart exhaustively detail every feature. This is not tech specs, this is a comparison of size, core features, and the announced battery times. If we used Scoble’s “features”, 3 to 5 of his “features” would be missing from most of the phones. If we detailed all features, would we also have to detail: accelerometers, proximity sensors, orientation sensors, multitouch screen, 4-8GB of onboard memory, visual voice mail, threaded messaging, integration with Mac OS and applications, iTunes/iPod functionality, the level of sophistication/number of features in photo viewing, etc, etc, etc…? Apparently, Brent felt he could leave a lot of those features out. I guess “better” and “left out” are subjective when you want to criticize Apple.

  19. Tim Snyder: “I dont think you got the point. The point here is that Apple’s chart omits these details.”

    No, I’d say you don’t get the point. I’ve never seen a single comparison chart exhaustively detail every feature. This is not tech specs, this is a comparison of size, core features, and the announced battery times. If we used Scoble’s “features”, 3 to 5 of his “features” would be missing from most of the phones. If we detailed all features, would we also have to detail: accelerometers, proximity sensors, orientation sensors, multitouch screen, 4-8GB of onboard memory, visual voice mail, threaded messaging, integration with Mac OS and applications, iTunes/iPod functionality, the level of sophistication/number of features in photo viewing, etc, etc, etc…? Apparently, Brent felt he could leave a lot of those features out. I guess “better” and “left out” are subjective when you want to criticize Apple.

  20. I think they are sacrificing flexibility for elegance, design, and usability. This is MAC standard mantra. “Do it our way or use something else.”

    IPhones are for the I have way too much dispobable income crowd. I doubt business will ever bite on in a big way.

  21. I think they are sacrificing flexibility for elegance, design, and usability. This is MAC standard mantra. “Do it our way or use something else.”

    IPhones are for the I have way too much dispobable income crowd. I doubt business will ever bite on in a big way.

  22. How does one run .NET apps on a Symbian OS? I am guessing, well more than guessing, you can’t unless of course you meant web apps.. both do hat so Robert you better scrub off your number 7 thing and take your list down to 8, or maybe 7 if you believe your own posts that there is a conspiracy with adobe employee’s “not talking” about a Flash plugin for the iPhone.

  23. How does one run .NET apps on a Symbian OS? I am guessing, well more than guessing, you can’t unless of course you meant web apps.. both do hat so Robert you better scrub off your number 7 thing and take your list down to 8, or maybe 7 if you believe your own posts that there is a conspiracy with adobe employee’s “not talking” about a Flash plugin for the iPhone.

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