The invisible audience shows up — on Facebook

OK, yesterday when i wrote I’d add all of you as my Facebook friends I had about 600 friends. Today I have more than 1,300. Tons of you wrote you love my blog. But most of you don’t comment. In fact, out of the 700 people who added me as a Facebook friend I can only see about 20 that have left a comment — ever.

What is fascinating to me is now I have a new way to understand my audience. Where you live. Where you go to school. What your hobbies are. What you look like (most have posted their pictures).

Plus, I have another source of interesting blogs and interesting information coming to me. Thanks for participating! I’m still adding new friends, by the way.

It’s easier than getting into a TechCrunch party (Mike Arrington just put another 100 tickets out on TechCrunch and sold out in eight minutes. Amazing! He announced the sale on Twitter).

I asked people on Twitter about why most people don’t comment and got back a variety of responses from “requires me to think” to “shy.” Anyway, why don’t YOU comment on my blog? It’s quite obvious that there’s a much larger group of you that don’t comment than do.

218 thoughts on “The invisible audience shows up — on Facebook

  1. What’s the point of posting something if you have nothing to say? I don’t. Although it’s probably a good thing not everyone subscribes to that attitude, or 90% of blogs would vanish overnight if everyone subscribed to that theory, and then what would we laugh at?

  2. What’s the point of posting something if you have nothing to say? I don’t. Although it’s probably a good thing not everyone subscribes to that attitude, or 90% of blogs would vanish overnight if everyone subscribed to that theory, and then what would we laugh at?

  3. I commend you on the effort and initiative in this Robert… Especially with all that’s going on now in your life (congrats!) Been on the fence for a while with FB, but read your blog all the time, but with time being the scarcest resource of all have limited my linked in and FB time… With that being said – sending you an invite :-) ~ all the best, Paul.

  4. I commend you on the effort and initiative in this Robert… Especially with all that’s going on now in your life (congrats!) Been on the fence for a while with FB, but read your blog all the time, but with time being the scarcest resource of all have limited my linked in and FB time… With that being said – sending you an invite :-) ~ all the best, Paul.

  5. I agree that I have not posted too many comments on your blog but I have done it once or twice.
    So, here comes one more.
    Will be great to see your footprints/remarks on my blog too.
    Thanks.

  6. I agree that I have not posted too many comments on your blog but I have done it once or twice.
    So, here comes one more.
    Will be great to see your footprints/remarks on my blog too.
    Thanks.

  7. I love your blog. But when I go through all my feeds, I don’t have time to leave comments on all the blogs I like. So in fact I rarely comment on any blogs at all, only when there is really something of value I contribute, something that is new (see also comment #103, that is the same thing for me).

  8. I love your blog. But when I go through all my feeds, I don’t have time to leave comments on all the blogs I like. So in fact I rarely comment on any blogs at all, only when there is really something of value I contribute, something that is new (see also comment #103, that is the same thing for me).

  9. Just to prove a point: “Me too.”

    I block my feed reading sessions together and so am typically 1+ day behind everyone else – hence usually nothing useful to add to the conversation. Plus Google Reader discourages commenting.

    -Nigel

  10. Just to prove a point: “Me too.”

    I block my feed reading sessions together and so am typically 1+ day behind everyone else – hence usually nothing useful to add to the conversation. Plus Google Reader discourages commenting.

    -Nigel

Comments are closed.