My first Fast Company magazine column is up

I’m now writing a column for Fast Company magazine and my first column, along with a video interview and a version of my link blog is now up. It’s really different writing for a magazine because of the size constraints. They asked me to stay to about 750 words. That’s really tough when you’re asked to teach the readers something about what’s happening in technology and how that’s going to affect companies. I enjoyed doing the video interview a lot more because we could get into a bit more depth.

Comments

  1. The only magazine we subscribe to is Linux Journal. I’ve honestly never heard of this magazine. It’s not the WSJ, but I guess it’s a start.

  2. The only magazine we subscribe to is Linux Journal. I’ve honestly never heard of this magazine. It’s not the WSJ, but I guess it’s a start.

  3. Yes, I read it this last night. Great start – well done.

    I suppose that an interesting challenge you will have with the column is that unlike regular readers of your blog, Fast Company readers are not necessarily techies. Therefore you will probably have to explain more terms than you would do here – and do so succinctly. I think you have pulled it off in this first article but then again, I am sort of a techie and a regular reader of your blog, so I may not be the best judge.

    I live in the United Kingdom by the way so good job by Fast Company to have delivered this issue so promptly. Actually, they mostly do.

  4. Yes, I read it this last night. Great start – well done.

    I suppose that an interesting challenge you will have with the column is that unlike regular readers of your blog, Fast Company readers are not necessarily techies. Therefore you will probably have to explain more terms than you would do here – and do so succinctly. I think you have pulled it off in this first article but then again, I am sort of a techie and a regular reader of your blog, so I may not be the best judge.

    I live in the United Kingdom by the way so good job by Fast Company to have delivered this issue so promptly. Actually, they mostly do.

  5. I better read it to before I judge. Speaking of judging, MS may not know this but here you can submit surprise evidence up to 15 days before the trial. It can be awfully surprising. Just a fun fact I thought I would throw in.

  6. I better read it to before I judge. Speaking of judging, MS may not know this but here you can submit surprise evidence up to 15 days before the trial. It can be awfully surprising. Just a fun fact I thought I would throw in.

  7. Hey Scoble!
    Love your stuff, we are going to talk about you on our podcast next week. We have a regular podcasting news segment, and you represent the podcasting community well.
    Keep up the good work.

  8. Hey Scoble!
    Love your stuff, we are going to talk about you on our podcast next week. We have a regular podcasting news segment, and you represent the podcasting community well.
    Keep up the good work.

  9. Robert,

    One point I think folks are missing on the entire Apollo/Silverlight argument is the ability to build robust database applications. Online v. offline seems to garner much of the attention – but it’s really the ability to store larger amounts of data locally and synchronize that remotely.

    Managing this synchronization will really enhance applications that require large data stores online and improve local performance. One example: I open my subscriber database of 100,000 subscribers, search, make changes, and upload that data.

    With current browser storage (ie. Cookies), there’s a 2k limitation. Storing it in the browser itself will bury system resources. However, if I have a local data store that I can synchronize, I can manage a very efficient transportation of data between the local desktop and remote server.

    This should entice many client/server applications to move online in a SaaS model because now they can efficiently move data, communicate and manage the software release from a single source.

    Regards!
    Doug

  10. Robert,

    One point I think folks are missing on the entire Apollo/Silverlight argument is the ability to build robust database applications. Online v. offline seems to garner much of the attention – but it’s really the ability to store larger amounts of data locally and synchronize that remotely.

    Managing this synchronization will really enhance applications that require large data stores online and improve local performance. One example: I open my subscriber database of 100,000 subscribers, search, make changes, and upload that data.

    With current browser storage (ie. Cookies), there’s a 2k limitation. Storing it in the browser itself will bury system resources. However, if I have a local data store that I can synchronize, I can manage a very efficient transportation of data between the local desktop and remote server.

    This should entice many client/server applications to move online in a SaaS model because now they can efficiently move data, communicate and manage the software release from a single source.

    Regards!
    Doug

  11. The other thing about my column is that it’s edited and went through a process to get it done. So, it’s not just my words in there like here on the blog. Very different kind of writing.

  12. The other thing about my column is that it’s edited and went through a process to get it done. So, it’s not just my words in there like here on the blog. Very different kind of writing.

  13. That’s a pretty big fish you’ve landed! :)

    You’re well on your way to A-List IRW (*) Status to match your blogging status!

    Well done!!

    * In Real World

  14. That’s a pretty big fish you’ve landed! :)

    You’re well on your way to A-List IRW (*) Status to match your blogging status!

    Well done!!

    * In Real World

  15. No mention of your VP status at Podtech on the Fast Company site. Are you still retaining the Podtech position?

  16. No mention of your VP status at Podtech on the Fast Company site. Are you still retaining the Podtech position?

  17. scoble : You’re right. The article’s style and layout is very different from your blog posts. I have a feeling you were able to convey more with much shorter articles in this blog…

  18. scoble : You’re right. The article’s style and layout is very different from your blog posts. I have a feeling you were able to convey more with much shorter articles in this blog…

  19. “Chris: this is a popular magazine for business people to read. They sell more than 700,000 copies.”

    I’ve never seen it in Canada. Only the really big stuff makes it up here.

  20. “Chris: this is a popular magazine for business people to read. They sell more than 700,000 copies.”

    I’ve never seen it in Canada. Only the really big stuff makes it up here.