Jakob Nielsen says “don’t be like Scoble”

Jakob Nielsen’s Web 1.0 post today sends lots of gestures:

1. Don’t do quick posts like Scoble.
2. Don’t risk being an idiot like Scoble.
3. Don’t put comments on your idiocy like Scoble.
4. Don’t link to other idiots like Scoble.
5. If you want to seem like you know something, unlike Scoble, write long ass white papers with lots of charts.
6. Don’t have fun like that idiot Scoble.
7. Don’t you dare put pictures of cats or babies or other personal details up like Scoble does.
8. Don’t add Web 2.0 mechanisms to your Web site like Scoble does. Definitely no “del.icio.us” or “Digg” voting graphics.
9. Don’t get caught dead inside an Apple store like Scoble does.
10. Don’t give Fake Steve or Valleywag a reason to deride you like Scoble does.
11. Definitely don’t get close to Twitter/Jaiku/Pownce/Facebook like Scoble does. If you can say it in 140 characters you shouldn’t say it at all.

OK, he didn’t quite say all of those things on his Web site today.

Well, I wish I could tell you the truth about Jacob (he worked for me back in the 1990s at one of our conferences — we never hired him again) but Steve Wozniak taught me to never say anything if I can’t say something nice about someone.

Yes, I am a sucker for good link bait. Sorry. Guilty as charged. I’m not the only one.

I will say this, it’s amazing that we’re listening to a guy who has an uglier Web site than I do.

Oh, wait, he just wrote a post worthy of Valleywag or Fake Steve except he doesn’t have comments, doesn’t have trackbacks, and used about 2,000 words to say something a better writer would say in about 300 words.

Heh!

262 thoughts on “Jakob Nielsen says “don’t be like Scoble”

  1. I’m a guilty of posting too quickly some time ago. As a result, I was tagged as spamming! Shocks! I think when posting, you should do it in a pacing that’s not too fast that blogs might see you as robots.

  2. I’m a guilty of posting too quickly some time ago. As a result, I was tagged as spamming! Shocks! I think when posting, you should do it in a pacing that’s not too fast that blogs might see you as robots.

  3. There’s obviously different kinds of people, and the content of your site should depend on the type of audience / customer you’re wishing to lock on to.
    That’s why I do agree with Jakob’s statement that, “To demonstrate world-class expertise, avoid quickly written, shallow postings. Instead, invest your time in thorough, value-added content that attracts paying customers.”
    Even though you didn’t agree, Scoble, the fact is that he is right on this point. But, as you said, there’s a place for both of them. Yes, I also just want to know that there’s meat in Aisle. 4 but I don’t consider some of my passionate interests ‘meat.’ With those, I want details!

  4. There’s obviously different kinds of people, and the content of your site should depend on the type of audience / customer you’re wishing to lock on to.
    That’s why I do agree with Jakob’s statement that, “To demonstrate world-class expertise, avoid quickly written, shallow postings. Instead, invest your time in thorough, value-added content that attracts paying customers.”
    Even though you didn’t agree, Scoble, the fact is that he is right on this point. But, as you said, there’s a place for both of them. Yes, I also just want to know that there’s meat in Aisle. 4 but I don’t consider some of my passionate interests ‘meat.’ With those, I want details!

  5. I feel some of you didn’t read Mr Nielsen’s article. Nielsen wasn’t targeting any one person. Scoble is an A-list blogger to be sure. He maybe is an expert at blogging, but that’s about it. I’ve read Robert’s postings from time to time and enjoy some of them. But for me none of them have any lasting value. They are mostly like pop culture. What’s new and exciting now, is boring or outdated 6 hours, 6 days, 6 weeks or 6 months from now. Though that probably describes most of the regular Scobelizer readers I imagine.

    I have a large collection of bookmarks to content I’ve found interesting. Almost none of it is on a blog, it’s mostly in depth articles found on more traditional web sites. Now you certainly can do those on a blog, but most people that blog don’t. I think part of the problem is that people new to blogging think you need to post short, frequent notes about this or that and real content is to difficult and must be posted on a “real’ website. This happens because most of the blogs they see are like that.

    Nielsen is saying that if your are an expert provide content people can’t find elsewhere, that gives them better value. Short twitter about “check out my friend at _______ kind of posts are essentially useless to most out of the gate and almost everyone a year later. Why clutter the web with useless posts — just because it’s easy I guess.

    Actually I think the one thing Robert excels best at is being an opportunist. Robert, you know Nielsen’s post wasn’t about you, but you know you can stir up controversy by pretending you think that it was.

  6. I feel some of you didn’t read Mr Nielsen’s article. Nielsen wasn’t targeting any one person. Scoble is an A-list blogger to be sure. He maybe is an expert at blogging, but that’s about it. I’ve read Robert’s postings from time to time and enjoy some of them. But for me none of them have any lasting value. They are mostly like pop culture. What’s new and exciting now, is boring or outdated 6 hours, 6 days, 6 weeks or 6 months from now. Though that probably describes most of the regular Scobelizer readers I imagine.

    I have a large collection of bookmarks to content I’ve found interesting. Almost none of it is on a blog, it’s mostly in depth articles found on more traditional web sites. Now you certainly can do those on a blog, but most people that blog don’t. I think part of the problem is that people new to blogging think you need to post short, frequent notes about this or that and real content is to difficult and must be posted on a “real’ website. This happens because most of the blogs they see are like that.

    Nielsen is saying that if your are an expert provide content people can’t find elsewhere, that gives them better value. Short twitter about “check out my friend at _______ kind of posts are essentially useless to most out of the gate and almost everyone a year later. Why clutter the web with useless posts — just because it’s easy I guess.

    Actually I think the one thing Robert excels best at is being an opportunist. Robert, you know Nielsen’s post wasn’t about you, but you know you can stir up controversy by pretending you think that it was.

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