19 thoughts on “The shirt of the week

  1. Pingback: No funciona.
  2. Dude, that shirts is so old – I still have one in the cupboard. Probably got it in 2002 from the guys at ntk.net – their webshop is http://www.ntkmart.co.uk/. I bought that and one with iMachiavellian – think dissident (in the Mac style of the time – sadly they don’t make those anymore as it was my favourite). Cool shirts – get’s laughs when ever I wear it.

  3. Dude, that shirts is so old – I still have one in the cupboard. Probably got it in 2002 from the guys at ntk.net – their webshop is http://www.ntkmart.co.uk/. I bought that and one with iMachiavellian – think dissident (in the Mac style of the time – sadly they don’t make those anymore as it was my favourite). Cool shirts – get’s laughs when ever I wear it.

  4. This post is low key. Let me ask something.
    The people on our SN site brought this to my attention.
    http://www.wired.com/politics/law/news/2007/07/fbi_spyware

    “The CIPAV then settles into a silent “pen register” mode, in which it lurks on the target computer and monitors its internet use, logging the IP address of every computer to which the machine connects for up to 60 days.”

    I know this kid’s machine was not Linux. SELinux ect… would have killed that.
    Can you interview people at MS about leaving holes in their OS for law enforcement or other purposes?
    Why and how other govts like that of Canada or Europe are supposed to feel when the US agencies have unfettered access to their classified information via these vulnerability access points?
    They could be using published exploits, but for something that critical, where they are trying to piggyback a virus on somebody’s machine via email and they only have 1 shot at it. I dunno. Is that why we can’t see the source code to Windows? Other than the Win2k src that was leaked to newsgroups?
    What’s going on here?

  5. This post is low key. Let me ask something.
    The people on our SN site brought this to my attention.
    http://www.wired.com/politics/law/news/2007/07/fbi_spyware

    “The CIPAV then settles into a silent “pen register” mode, in which it lurks on the target computer and monitors its internet use, logging the IP address of every computer to which the machine connects for up to 60 days.”

    I know this kid’s machine was not Linux. SELinux ect… would have killed that.
    Can you interview people at MS about leaving holes in their OS for law enforcement or other purposes?
    Why and how other govts like that of Canada or Europe are supposed to feel when the US agencies have unfettered access to their classified information via these vulnerability access points?
    They could be using published exploits, but for something that critical, where they are trying to piggyback a virus on somebody’s machine via email and they only have 1 shot at it. I dunno. Is that why we can’t see the source code to Windows? Other than the Win2k src that was leaked to newsgroups?
    What’s going on here?

  6. Wow.
    BTW, Our guy Matt from Copernic Desktop Search is getting offers, but is still up for grabs until somebody signs. Check the link if you are interested. I want to get this over with.

    Witty shirt, just ..witty. ;)

  7. Wow.
    BTW, Our guy Matt from Copernic Desktop Search is getting offers, but is still up for grabs until somebody signs. Check the link if you are interested. I want to get this over with.

    Witty shirt, just ..witty. ;)

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