iPhone vs. Nokia N95 a month later

CNBC is going to be here in a few minutes to interview Patrick about his iPhone, a month later, to see if he still likes it.

Dave Winer writes about his iPhone
. You might be surprised by his review because he is pretty brutal about the iPhone.

Me?

I agree with Dave Winer. if you are a hard-core email or even cell phone user the iPhone will probably leave you wanting (I find it frustrating to dig through my thousands of contacts, for instance, but then I’m weird — most people don’t have thousands of people they need to have on their phone so they can call them). I’ve been talking with a bunch of people who switched from Blackberries to iPhones and most, while happy, do wish the iPhone had some better things for email users. One guy, though, told me he’ll never go back to Blackberry, no matter how good the keyboard is. Why? HTML email. He loves getting his newsletters in their full glory.

Me? I’m getting rid of my Nokia N95. I need a couple of weeks more income before I can afford to get an iPhone (believe it or not I don’t have an unlimited “gadget” budget). But the Nokia just continues to piss me off. I realized it the other day when Google Maps wouldn’t come up due to an out-of-memory error and I asked Patrick to hand me his iPhone.

Oh, and I counted the clicks to open up Google Maps on my Nokia N95: 11. How many on the iPhone? One.

I disagree with Dave Winer about the Web. I TOTALLY enjoy reading the Web much more on the iPhone than the Nokia. The Nokia does not thrill, the iPhone does. Am I a simpleton for liking a product that thrills (has nice user interactions?) Yes. Shoot me.

One other thing: I can’t use a device with a QWERTY keyboard. Why? Because I’m an addict. When I had a Blackberry I used it so often my hands started hurting. I lost that device in a cab in New Orleans and my hands stopped hurting. So, I don’t use my mobile device for answering email anymore. I can’t. That’s me.

One guy told me he missed his Blackberry because he couldn’t use the iPhone while he drives. That’s an addict’s behavior. Personally it’s GOOD that the iPhone can’t be used while you drive (although Google Maps are easier to use on the iPhone while driving than on the Nokia N95 because you can get to a map with one click on the iPhone, where the Nokia takes 11, or more).

Which brings us to reviewer bias. Every reviewer sees the world through their own eyes. I sure do and that’s why some of my readers get mad at me “will you shut up about Facebook and iPhone already?”

I’ve been talking to a LOT of normal people and notice that they are far more likely to really enjoy the iPhone. Except for one thing: the price. Most people have never used the Web on their cell phone. Most people have never listened to music on their cell phone. Most people have never used Google Maps on their cell phone. Most people have never answered an email on their cell phone.

It’s the “most people” that Dave Winer (and me) usually forget.

But when I talked with a Google executive he told me that they are seeing FAR HIGHER usage on the iPhone than any other device that Google’s apps and services are on.

Why does a pretty UI and thrilling interactions matter? Because it affords using it. That’s why the iPhone wins and the Nokia doesn’t. And, yes, I realize that I’ll get bagged on by all the Nokia fans who will remind me once more about the GPS, the better camera, the replaceable battery, yadda yadda yadda. You can save your evangelism for another day (I know Nokia is working on making its software much better, so you’ll probably soon get to come back here and tell me all about it then).

One last thing. Dave is right. The biggest hole that Apple has left for its competitors is a really really really lame software developer platform (IE, non-existent, iPhone developers can’t even get data from the accelerometers on the iPhone, which really is lame). Did I say “really” enough times to drive home the point?

Anyway, I’ll let you know when I get my iPhone. It’s going to be soon then. I’ll have to decide what to do with the N95. I’m thinking of giving it away in a contest or selling it and donating the fees from it to charity since it was given to me by PureMobile.

If you have an iPhone: what do you think?

Comments

  1. I don’t use email on mine yet (the email torrent called my Inbox just makes it pointless. 3158 unread and climbing…), but Dave’s smoking crack about the Web.

    The iPhone’s web stuff really really rocks, and it’s a game changer for me and my employees. All of a sudden, we can do work 24/7. Every single piece of SmugMug works on the phone, so we can help customers, debug problems, and even beta test new features from anywhere there’s connectivity.

    I wrote a mini review of it for Business 2.0′s Gadgets section about how useful it is to CEOs, but now that they’re going under, it’s not going to be published… guess I’d better stick it on my blog. :)

  2. I don’t use email on mine yet (the email torrent called my Inbox just makes it pointless. 3158 unread and climbing…), but Dave’s smoking crack about the Web.

    The iPhone’s web stuff really really rocks, and it’s a game changer for me and my employees. All of a sudden, we can do work 24/7. Every single piece of SmugMug works on the phone, so we can help customers, debug problems, and even beta test new features from anywhere there’s connectivity.

    I wrote a mini review of it for Business 2.0′s Gadgets section about how useful it is to CEOs, but now that they’re going under, it’s not going to be published… guess I’d better stick it on my blog. :)

  3. I’ve just sold my N95. It is without doubt one of the most over-hyped pieces of equipment I have come across. Yes it does all it says on the box… but badly, VERY badly!

    I don’t mind the fact I might have to charge a device once a day (if necessary), but the thought that I can’t use the device to any great length without worrying I might have to charge it before the end of the day. Come on! This is 2007!

    I’ve gone back to my Blackberry 8800. Does all the N95 does (except camera and wi-fi), but better…. MUCH better and doesn’t make me think twice about battery power. Big up the Blackberry.

    There are only 2 devices I will upgrade to. Fristly the next 8800 series Blackberry, when it makes it over here to the UK (because it has wi-fi in it) and probably iPhone 2.0 – when ever that might be.

  4. I’ve just sold my N95. It is without doubt one of the most over-hyped pieces of equipment I have come across. Yes it does all it says on the box… but badly, VERY badly!

    I don’t mind the fact I might have to charge a device once a day (if necessary), but the thought that I can’t use the device to any great length without worrying I might have to charge it before the end of the day. Come on! This is 2007!

    I’ve gone back to my Blackberry 8800. Does all the N95 does (except camera and wi-fi), but better…. MUCH better and doesn’t make me think twice about battery power. Big up the Blackberry.

    There are only 2 devices I will upgrade to. Fristly the next 8800 series Blackberry, when it makes it over here to the UK (because it has wi-fi in it) and probably iPhone 2.0 – when ever that might be.

  5. I’ve used the iPhone and my Blackberry Curve and I still prefer the Curve. Is the screen as nice or as large as the iPhone? No. But it does have copy and paste, which I use ALOT on my Blackberry and my Blackberry also connects and fully syncs with my company’s Exchange server.

    While I agree, the iPhone mobile web experience is a very nice but I’ve been using various Blackberry devices for viewing the web for a few years now. Not to mention the Google Map application which is great.

    The biggest problem with the iPhone is the lack of an SDK and a closed platform.

    I think I’ll wait for version 5 of the iPhone, just like I did with an Ipod.

  6. I’ve used the iPhone and my Blackberry Curve and I still prefer the Curve. Is the screen as nice or as large as the iPhone? No. But it does have copy and paste, which I use ALOT on my Blackberry and my Blackberry also connects and fully syncs with my company’s Exchange server.

    While I agree, the iPhone mobile web experience is a very nice but I’ve been using various Blackberry devices for viewing the web for a few years now. Not to mention the Google Map application which is great.

    The biggest problem with the iPhone is the lack of an SDK and a closed platform.

    I think I’ll wait for version 5 of the iPhone, just like I did with an Ipod.

  7. Good personal review – and I think that’s the key for both camps who’ll come to duiscuss this here. Personal is different to everyone, and it is very easy to go from “I like this” to “everyone should get it.”

    One small correction though :-) the N95 allows you to set six icons on the standby screen for quick access, and the two soft keys to any app. So Google Maps on my N95 *is* one press.

  8. Good personal review – and I think that’s the key for both camps who’ll come to duiscuss this here. Personal is different to everyone, and it is very easy to go from “I like this” to “everyone should get it.”

    One small correction though :-) the N95 allows you to set six icons on the standby screen for quick access, and the two soft keys to any app. So Google Maps on my N95 *is* one press.

  9. I’m thinking about ditching the N95 when the iPhone is released in the UK later on this year. Some of the N95 applications are cool but I’ve recently, I keep on getting error messages whenever I’ve switch on the camera or open office.

    Robert, have you compared the picture quality between the iPhone and N95? (I think you compared them on your blog or Facebook some time ago but I can’t find the link).

  10. I’m thinking about ditching the N95 when the iPhone is released in the UK later on this year. Some of the N95 applications are cool but I’ve recently, I keep on getting error messages whenever I’ve switch on the camera or open office.

    Robert, have you compared the picture quality between the iPhone and N95? (I think you compared them on your blog or Facebook some time ago but I can’t find the link).

  11. HTML e-mail definitely rocks. Perhaps the single most important upgrade from Windows Mobile 5 to Windows Mobile 6.

    But I agree with the assessment about “most people”. The simple fact is that the iPhone is not built for the early adopters – it’s built for the masses. There are a number of reasons I haven’t bought an iPhone yet, and none of them are relevant to the majority of users.

    I wrote a couple of weeks ago that the iPhone is a game-changer because it’s the first smartphone that the average user cares about. It’s helped make the phone less of a commodity for the other 98%.

    http://slashstar.com/blogs/tim/archive/2007/07/05/the-iphone-is-a-game-changer.aspx

  12. HTML e-mail definitely rocks. Perhaps the single most important upgrade from Windows Mobile 5 to Windows Mobile 6.

    But I agree with the assessment about “most people”. The simple fact is that the iPhone is not built for the early adopters – it’s built for the masses. There are a number of reasons I haven’t bought an iPhone yet, and none of them are relevant to the majority of users.

    I wrote a couple of weeks ago that the iPhone is a game-changer because it’s the first smartphone that the average user cares about. It’s helped make the phone less of a commodity for the other 98%.

    http://slashstar.com/blogs/tim/archive/2007/07/05/the-iphone-is-a-game-changer.aspx

  13. Robert,
    I have been following your iPhone journey from the beginning. The comparison that comes up in my head regarding the iphone vs other smartphones is just like the Mac and PC debate. I personally use a Dell laptop at work, but really enjoy using my wife’s MacBook at home. It just seems easier and more enjoyable to me. I wonder why I put up with Windows sometimes. I had a Cingular 8125 and liked it because of all the things it could do, but after I had to restart it several times a day with heavy use it wasn’t fun. It was frustrating(sounds like your N95 experience). I have enjoyed the iphone tremendously, not because I can show it off, but because it does the things I want without having to restart it several times a day.

    I’ll keep watching to see how it goes with the iphone.

  14. Robert,
    I have been following your iPhone journey from the beginning. The comparison that comes up in my head regarding the iphone vs other smartphones is just like the Mac and PC debate. I personally use a Dell laptop at work, but really enjoy using my wife’s MacBook at home. It just seems easier and more enjoyable to me. I wonder why I put up with Windows sometimes. I had a Cingular 8125 and liked it because of all the things it could do, but after I had to restart it several times a day with heavy use it wasn’t fun. It was frustrating(sounds like your N95 experience). I have enjoyed the iphone tremendously, not because I can show it off, but because it does the things I want without having to restart it several times a day.

    I’ll keep watching to see how it goes with the iphone.

  15. Here’s what I said the iPhone was going to do a few weeks before launch.

    http://dmiessler.com/archives/1385

    And that’s what happened. Here’s the basic idea:

    “Few things done beautifully beats many things done like crap.”

    Here’s a good summary of the form vs. function debate:

    http://dmiessler.com/archives/1429

    …and why only the customers will determine who is ultimately right. You’re right about that, Robert — it’s they who will decide.

  16. Here’s what I said the iPhone was going to do a few weeks before launch.

    http://dmiessler.com/archives/1385

    And that’s what happened. Here’s the basic idea:

    “Few things done beautifully beats many things done like crap.”

    Here’s a good summary of the form vs. function debate:

    http://dmiessler.com/archives/1429

    …and why only the customers will determine who is ultimately right. You’re right about that, Robert — it’s they who will decide.

  17. Things will get better. In my opinion, Apple is a company that listens to its fan-base. They even implemented a suggestion I made for iTunes, although they did it on the iPhone – at least that’s what I would like to think; it could also have been a coincidence.

  18. Things will get better. In my opinion, Apple is a company that listens to its fan-base. They even implemented a suggestion I made for iTunes, although they did it on the iPhone – at least that’s what I would like to think; it could also have been a coincidence.

  19. I know better than to spend much time talking with my parents about geek toys, because by and large, they really don’t care. And that’s OK.

    Imagine my surprise when I got a call from my mother yesterday, asking me if she should get an iPhone for Dad so that he could use the Internet access feature to check weather charts while on his boat.

    The iPhone has its drawbacks, we all know, but Tim @ #3 is completely correct. When the 65+ contingent is seriously considering buying an iPhone, the game has changed in a very big way.

  20. I have never owned a personal smart phone, only regular old cell phones. My work bought me a Win Mobile phone a few months ago and I hate it. I can’t see why anyone would want to own one of these things. But the iPhone is different. It is a blast to use. And what has surprised me the most is how easy it is to type on it. You do literally have to forget that you might be making typos and just go for it–and then you look back and the phone has corrected 99% of your mistakes. It’s unreal. Any annoyance I think of while working on it slips out my mind in milliseconds because inevitably the next thing I click brings me back into it’s magical world. Everyone I show it to–geeks, iPod haters, and average joe, are wowed by the device and could see how useful and fun a device like this could be. “It’s just like the commercials”–I get that almost everytime. Once more and more consumers get their hands on it, it will sell more and more. Once the price comes down, it will be as big as the iPod. I told myself that I couldn’t get one because of the price, but my wife (who has been listening to me talk about the iPhone for 6 months) surprised me and bought it with some spare money she had. So glad she did!

  21. I have never owned a personal smart phone, only regular old cell phones. My work bought me a Win Mobile phone a few months ago and I hate it. I can’t see why anyone would want to own one of these things. But the iPhone is different. It is a blast to use. And what has surprised me the most is how easy it is to type on it. You do literally have to forget that you might be making typos and just go for it–and then you look back and the phone has corrected 99% of your mistakes. It’s unreal. Any annoyance I think of while working on it slips out my mind in milliseconds because inevitably the next thing I click brings me back into it’s magical world. Everyone I show it to–geeks, iPod haters, and average joe, are wowed by the device and could see how useful and fun a device like this could be. “It’s just like the commercials”–I get that almost everytime. Once more and more consumers get their hands on it, it will sell more and more. Once the price comes down, it will be as big as the iPod. I told myself that I couldn’t get one because of the price, but my wife (who has been listening to me talk about the iPhone for 6 months) surprised me and bought it with some spare money she had. So glad she did!

  22. I know better than to spend much time talking with my parents about geek toys, because by and large, they really don’t care. And that’s OK.

    Imagine my surprise when I got a call from my mother yesterday, asking me if she should get an iPhone for Dad so that he could use the Internet access feature to check weather charts while on his boat.

    The iPhone has its drawbacks, we all know, but Tim @ #3 is completely correct. When the 65+ contingent is seriously considering buying an iPhone, the game has changed in a very big way.

  23. If you are looking for someone to take the Nokia off your hands then I would be the first in line. I am a pastor who can’t find it in his budget to fit the N95. We could set it up that you also get credit for giving it to charity. Just a thought. Thanks for your insight on both phones.

  24. If you are looking for someone to take the Nokia off your hands then I would be the first in line. I am a pastor who can’t find it in his budget to fit the N95. We could set it up that you also get credit for giving it to charity. Just a thought. Thanks for your insight on both phones.

  25. Ewan: the Nokia still takes more clicks than the iPhone. One click for the icon. Another click when it asks “Allow application Google Maps to use network and send or receive data?” Another for “Select access point.” That’s three more than the iPhone does.

  26. Ewan: the Nokia still takes more clicks than the iPhone. One click for the icon. Another click when it asks “Allow application Google Maps to use network and send or receive data?” Another for “Select access point.” That’s three more than the iPhone does.

  27. I have not used any of the Nokia smart phones but I have been happy with my iPhone over the last 30 days and if I had to buy it again today I would do it because there are a few things which are very well done:
    - Convergence phone/itunes (I no longer have to carry two things).
    - Transparent integration with my desktop address book, photos and music.
    - Google maps
    - Visual voicemail

    Hopefully Apple will fix over time the data entry/keyboard issue (I see people sending email to themselves with URL so that they do not have to type in those URLs) and make it a true open platform.

    -Edwin

  28. I have not used any of the Nokia smart phones but I have been happy with my iPhone over the last 30 days and if I had to buy it again today I would do it because there are a few things which are very well done:
    - Convergence phone/itunes (I no longer have to carry two things).
    - Transparent integration with my desktop address book, photos and music.
    - Google maps
    - Visual voicemail

    Hopefully Apple will fix over time the data entry/keyboard issue (I see people sending email to themselves with URL so that they do not have to type in those URLs) and make it a true open platform.

    -Edwin

  29. That’s an addict’s behavior? Really?

    Are you saying that because you know the guy and know he’s an addict, or are you assuming he’s an addict because he finds a particular use case important that you think is unimportant?

    Why is it good that there are desirable use cases where the iPhone can’t be used?

    Are you just getting preachy about driving and cell-phoning?

  30. That’s an addict’s behavior? Really?

    Are you saying that because you know the guy and know he’s an addict, or are you assuming he’s an addict because he finds a particular use case important that you think is unimportant?

    Why is it good that there are desirable use cases where the iPhone can’t be used?

    Are you just getting preachy about driving and cell-phoning?

  31. I don’t have an iPhone; but I’ll tell you what I think anyways. You talk about “most people,” and these are the people that will like the iPhone, and here’s why: it’s a phone, it’s a camera, it’s an mp3 player. (well, and video too.) But for me, a working mom with a little purse, that means I only have to carry ONE device. I’m talking about the common mom who doesn’t lug around a 10mp digital SLR, or an 80G iPod, etc. See what I mean? For “most people” who aren’t perfectionists, this is the perfect way to put three devices into one and lighten my purse. Now me personally? I’m an avid videoblogger, and Apple won’t have me on the fishing line until the next iPhone takes videos as well.

  32. I don’t have an iPhone; but I’ll tell you what I think anyways. You talk about “most people,” and these are the people that will like the iPhone, and here’s why: it’s a phone, it’s a camera, it’s an mp3 player. (well, and video too.) But for me, a working mom with a little purse, that means I only have to carry ONE device. I’m talking about the common mom who doesn’t lug around a 10mp digital SLR, or an 80G iPod, etc. See what I mean? For “most people” who aren’t perfectionists, this is the perfect way to put three devices into one and lighten my purse. Now me personally? I’m an avid videoblogger, and Apple won’t have me on the fishing line until the next iPhone takes videos as well.

  33. For me in this post the most important thing you said Robert is “It’s the “most people” that Dave Winer (and me) usually forget.” I am a tech head like most everyone else that read these blogs but most of society is not. I keep sitting in meetings (I work in Higher Ed IT) where I hear people run down the user and I just sit there and think they don’t get it. It is about the user! Don’t design from the back-end to the front-end. Go from the front-end experience and design towards the back-end. I have to hand it to Apple in that I think they get this for the most part. The people designing most systems and services just don’t get it. Make it easy and casual and for the most part people will use it. You’ll sell more product and and your support requests will fall. Increased revenue and decreased expenditures. Hmmmmmm…..sounds like a recipe for a successful P/L statement.

    Okay, getting off my soapbox.

    -Sam

  34. I got my first smartphone last week – an HTC Mogul. It’s not as flashy as the iPhone, nor is the camera as nice as the N95, but it does a lot of things right. Well, at least for me. I’ve got a launcher to frequently-used apps on the main screen, which makes Google Maps one click away. It has nice, tactile QWERTY keyboard that slides out of sight when not in use. Plus, I can add third-party apps. Memory is expandable via a MicroSD card.

    Perhaps the next generation iPhone will provide more of the features that I’m looking for in a smartphone. For me, the Mogul is about as close as it comes.

  35. For me in this post the most important thing you said Robert is “It’s the “most people” that Dave Winer (and me) usually forget.” I am a tech head like most everyone else that read these blogs but most of society is not. I keep sitting in meetings (I work in Higher Ed IT) where I hear people run down the user and I just sit there and think they don’t get it. It is about the user! Don’t design from the back-end to the front-end. Go from the front-end experience and design towards the back-end. I have to hand it to Apple in that I think they get this for the most part. The people designing most systems and services just don’t get it. Make it easy and casual and for the most part people will use it. You’ll sell more product and and your support requests will fall. Increased revenue and decreased expenditures. Hmmmmmm…..sounds like a recipe for a successful P/L statement.

    Okay, getting off my soapbox.

    -Sam

  36. I got my first smartphone last week – an HTC Mogul. It’s not as flashy as the iPhone, nor is the camera as nice as the N95, but it does a lot of things right. Well, at least for me. I’ve got a launcher to frequently-used apps on the main screen, which makes Google Maps one click away. It has nice, tactile QWERTY keyboard that slides out of sight when not in use. Plus, I can add third-party apps. Memory is expandable via a MicroSD card.

    Perhaps the next generation iPhone will provide more of the features that I’m looking for in a smartphone. For me, the Mogul is about as close as it comes.

  37. I really like how my iPhone enables turn-by-turn driving instructions. Just tap an arrow at the top of the screen when you’ve completed one instruction and the map zooms forward to the next intersection, while the instructions tell you where to turn and on what street.

    I’m pleased to say that this feature has saved the day more than once for Andy and I.

  38. I really like how my iPhone enables turn-by-turn driving instructions. Just tap an arrow at the top of the screen when you’ve completed one instruction and the map zooms forward to the next intersection, while the instructions tell you where to turn and on what street.

    I’m pleased to say that this feature has saved the day more than once for Andy and I.

  39. I think the N95 was a freebie, and that led you to use it longer than you would have otherwise. I think your view of the phone would have been different had you coughed up $750 for the device.

    IPhone reviews and feedback are overwhelmingly positive (yes, it needs improvements, but not as many as other phones). The ones that are not are either from people trying hard not to be branded as “Apple fanbois,” or have uses for the device so narrow that one feature will trump all others. The latter is valid, though something that affects very few of us, the former is just silly.

  40. I think the N95 was a freebie, and that led you to use it longer than you would have otherwise. I think your view of the phone would have been different had you coughed up $750 for the device.

    IPhone reviews and feedback are overwhelmingly positive (yes, it needs improvements, but not as many as other phones). The ones that are not are either from people trying hard not to be branded as “Apple fanbois,” or have uses for the device so narrow that one feature will trump all others. The latter is valid, though something that affects very few of us, the former is just silly.

  41. “I’m getting rid of my Nokia N95. I need a couple of weeks more income before I can afford to get an iPhone”

    cough….

    I’m actually posting on Vista now, because a customer needs me to compile a flash movie of all things, but with that aside.

    The N95 is worth $679 Canadian brand new and unlocked.
    http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=3025379&sku=N529-1102

    I can either get you $300 cash for it if I have to unlock it or $325 if you unlock it before sending it.
    If not you can toss it up on eBay.

    That way you’ll almost have enough. Remember Canadians have to pay customs which amounts to sales tax on used stuff.
    Thanks

  42. “I’m getting rid of my Nokia N95. I need a couple of weeks more income before I can afford to get an iPhone”

    cough….

    I’m actually posting on Vista now, because a customer needs me to compile a flash movie of all things, but with that aside.

    The N95 is worth $679 Canadian brand new and unlocked.
    http://www.tigerdirect.ca/applications/searchtools/item-Details.asp?EdpNo=3025379&sku=N529-1102

    I can either get you $300 cash for it if I have to unlock it or $325 if you unlock it before sending it.
    If not you can toss it up on eBay.

    That way you’ll almost have enough. Remember Canadians have to pay customs which amounts to sales tax on used stuff.
    Thanks

  43. I don’t know about the N95 versus the iPhone, but my Nokia E61i is really impressing me. I have always been a Nokia fan, but got sucked into an insurance replacement contract with a horrible phone a couple years back. iPhone came out just as my contract was up. I ALMOST bought one, but ultimately went back to my favorite brand. The E61i will do most everything (save Visual Voicemail and of course the nice interface) that the iPhone will. I must have played around with the iPhone for days at the store, but it didn’t quite woo me over to the Mac side. The large screen on the E61i is probably better suited than the N95 for web. Inclusion of Wi-Fi is should just be standard on smart phones. Apple has an awesome product, no doubt, though.

  44. I don’t know about the N95 versus the iPhone, but my Nokia E61i is really impressing me. I have always been a Nokia fan, but got sucked into an insurance replacement contract with a horrible phone a couple years back. iPhone came out just as my contract was up. I ALMOST bought one, but ultimately went back to my favorite brand. The E61i will do most everything (save Visual Voicemail and of course the nice interface) that the iPhone will. I must have played around with the iPhone for days at the store, but it didn’t quite woo me over to the Mac side. The large screen on the E61i is probably better suited than the N95 for web. Inclusion of Wi-Fi is should just be standard on smart phones. Apple has an awesome product, no doubt, though.

  45. Only a couple things holding me back, the biggest is voice dialing. I haven’t looked at my phone in years, can’t imagine doing it now. It’s a gotta have for me and I can’t believe Apple would leave that out.
    As soon as they add that, the iPhone is mine. : -)

  46. Only a couple things holding me back, the biggest is voice dialing. I haven’t looked at my phone in years, can’t imagine doing it now. It’s a gotta have for me and I can’t believe Apple would leave that out.
    As soon as they add that, the iPhone is mine. : -)

  47. I moved from an iPhone from several years of Windows Mobile device usage. I have to say that I miss the syncing of Tasks the most as I used those but I can get around that issue by using an online task management tool like Ta-Da List.

    I will never go back because the iPhone is leaps and bounds above any other phone out there and it is simply more fun to use. I think that the best thing about the iPhone is all of the small things that Apple did right. I wrote about them here.

  48. I moved from an iPhone from several years of Windows Mobile device usage. I have to say that I miss the syncing of Tasks the most as I used those but I can get around that issue by using an online task management tool like Ta-Da List.

    I will never go back because the iPhone is leaps and bounds above any other phone out there and it is simply more fun to use. I think that the best thing about the iPhone is all of the small things that Apple did right. I wrote about them here.

  49. email set up for GMail…sucks!

    Bluetooth connection to my car…..sucks!

    not being able to use third party headphones that could with my iPod….sucks!

    Text messaging….sucks!

    No ActiveSync….sucks!

    Form factor is great. UI is great, with some minor annoyances.

    The headphone issue really is a PITA. The iPhone headphones suck. (Yea, I know, you can get a $10 adapter, but still….)

    And, hey Scoble, as far as your “broke all sales records” statement about the iPhone. Well, based on activations the day they went on sale….uh…not so much.

    http://machinist.salon.com/blog/2007/07/24/iphone_att_numbers/index.html

  50. email set up for GMail…sucks!

    Bluetooth connection to my car…..sucks!

    not being able to use third party headphones that could with my iPod….sucks!

    Text messaging….sucks!

    No ActiveSync….sucks!

    Form factor is great. UI is great, with some minor annoyances.

    The headphone issue really is a PITA. The iPhone headphones suck. (Yea, I know, you can get a $10 adapter, but still….)

    And, hey Scoble, as far as your “broke all sales records” statement about the iPhone. Well, based on activations the day they went on sale….uh…not so much.

    http://machinist.salon.com/blog/2007/07/24/iphone_att_numbers/index.html

  51. Google Maps on BlackBerry is also a single click and it has GPS support. Not sure what what you’re getting at with this metric.

  52. Google Maps on BlackBerry is also a single click and it has GPS support. Not sure what what you’re getting at with this metric.

  53. LayZ,

    Activations and sales are not the same thing. Further, how can you not be impressed with 146,000 activations in 30 hours? That’s 81 every minute!

    As for real sales, well, we’ll get a better idea (maybe) in Apple’s results today. I say “maybe” because I’m not certain Apple will break iPhone sales out.

  54. LayZ,

    Activations and sales are not the same thing. Further, how can you not be impressed with 146,000 activations in 30 hours? That’s 81 every minute!

    As for real sales, well, we’ll get a better idea (maybe) in Apple’s results today. I say “maybe” because I’m not certain Apple will break iPhone sales out.

  55. Pete: anyone who would use a phone while driving when everyone knows the dire consequences of doing so are addicts. First step: admit your addiction. :-)

  56. Pete: anyone who would use a phone while driving when everyone knows the dire consequences of doing so are addicts. First step: admit your addiction. :-)

  57. Tom: not to mention that 146,000 in 30 hours breaks all existing cell phone sales records.

    Not that that matters to LayZ who just likes to take a consistently anti-Scoble stance.

  58. Tom: not to mention that 146,000 in 30 hours breaks all existing cell phone sales records.

    Not that that matters to LayZ who just likes to take a consistently anti-Scoble stance.

  59. …anyone who would use a phone while driving … especially a new posh car he bought two or three weeks ago :-)

  60. …anyone who would use a phone while driving … especially a new posh car he bought two or three weeks ago :-)

  61. @33 and @35 So…shooting the messenger huh? Why did ATT shares slide apparently on the news? Some people weren’t impressed.

    And Winer mentioned the NTY article with the same news. I notice you didn’t take him to task over it. Again, don’t blame me. I was one of the 140

    And if there were 500,000 units sold as some speculated, why only 146000 activated? Don’t tell me people bought them as an iPod. ;-). Dumping them to eBay or Craigslist? 350,000? Hardly.

  62. @33 and @35 So…shooting the messenger huh? Why did ATT shares slide apparently on the news? Some people weren’t impressed.

    And Winer mentioned the NTY article with the same news. I notice you didn’t take him to task over it. Again, don’t blame me. I was one of the 140

    And if there were 500,000 units sold as some speculated, why only 146000 activated? Don’t tell me people bought them as an iPod. ;-). Dumping them to eBay or Craigslist? 350,000? Hardly.

  63. I agree with your observations, Robert. Third-party apps are currently my biggest frustration. There is so much potential with the interface and only allowing web applications limits the capability of the platform to succeed drastically!

    Nevertheless, despite the typical frustrations of the iPhone (Safari crashing + security issues, recessed headphone jack [wtf apple], poorly implemented gmail, minor text messaging quirks), the beauty of the interface and the joy that is now interfacing with my phone overrides those setbacks. A month after, people still like seeing my phone and I still take it out and enjoy using it every single day.

  64. I agree with your observations, Robert. Third-party apps are currently my biggest frustration. There is so much potential with the interface and only allowing web applications limits the capability of the platform to succeed drastically!

    Nevertheless, despite the typical frustrations of the iPhone (Safari crashing + security issues, recessed headphone jack [wtf apple], poorly implemented gmail, minor text messaging quirks), the beauty of the interface and the joy that is now interfacing with my phone overrides those setbacks. A month after, people still like seeing my phone and I still take it out and enjoy using it every single day.

  65. Have been Razr and Blackberry Pearl free since June 29. Email on the iPhone is superb and I don’t notice or particularly care about not having email pushed to me at a frequency > 15 minutes. In fact, I pushed mine back to check my three IMAP accounts hourly.

    Damon is right. The interface is so elegant it’s a joy to use. Minor quirks – yep. Joy factor so much higher. The screen resolution is simply brilliant.

    I am, without a doubt, more effective in communicating and digesting online information with the iPhone than I was with the Blackberry.

  66. Have been Razr and Blackberry Pearl free since June 29. Email on the iPhone is superb and I don’t notice or particularly care about not having email pushed to me at a frequency > 15 minutes. In fact, I pushed mine back to check my three IMAP accounts hourly.

    Damon is right. The interface is so elegant it’s a joy to use. Minor quirks – yep. Joy factor so much higher. The screen resolution is simply brilliant.

    I am, without a doubt, more effective in communicating and digesting online information with the iPhone than I was with the Blackberry.

  67. Well, Apple’s press release for 3Q results is out, and it mentions no specific iPhone sales numbers:

    ““We’re thrilled to report the highest June quarter revenue and profit in Apple’s history, along with the highest quarterly Mac sales ever,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “iPhone is off to a great start—we hope to sell our one-millionth iPhone by the end of its first full quarter of sales—and our new product pipeline is very strong.””

  68. Well, Apple’s press release for 3Q results is out, and it mentions no specific iPhone sales numbers:

    ““We’re thrilled to report the highest June quarter revenue and profit in Apple’s history, along with the highest quarterly Mac sales ever,” said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. “iPhone is off to a great start—we hope to sell our one-millionth iPhone by the end of its first full quarter of sales—and our new product pipeline is very strong.””

  69. This is a common problem I’ve had with Nokia phones.

    They need to sit their butts down and draw a map of the user interface. Then they’ll realize how many friggin’ clicks it takes to do anything.

    Another pet peeve is that I can’t turn the Loudspeaker on until AFTER the phone call has connected to a tower. WTF? That’s precisely when I want to use the loudspeaker — while waiting to connect.

  70. This is a common problem I’ve had with Nokia phones.

    They need to sit their butts down and draw a map of the user interface. Then they’ll realize how many friggin’ clicks it takes to do anything.

    Another pet peeve is that I can’t turn the Loudspeaker on until AFTER the phone call has connected to a tower. WTF? That’s precisely when I want to use the loudspeaker — while waiting to connect.

  71. My wife loves her iPhone. I don’t. Why? Because I’ve used a smartphone before; she hasn’t. If you’re leaving a BlackBerry, Nokia E or N series, or even a Treo (I’ve used all of them), you’re probably giving up functionality for form. iPhone just isn’t as productive for a mobile professional. My wife, on the other hand, feels like she’s more connected and with better access than ever before. It’s true, but she’s never used a phone for anything more than calling and the occasionally, short, rudimentary text message. Give me cut, copy, paste; push email; voice dialing; bluetooth sync w/ my MacBook Pro; 3rd party “offline” applications; faster browsing and I’m likely to be a iPhone convert.

  72. My wife loves her iPhone. I don’t. Why? Because I’ve used a smartphone before; she hasn’t. If you’re leaving a BlackBerry, Nokia E or N series, or even a Treo (I’ve used all of them), you’re probably giving up functionality for form. iPhone just isn’t as productive for a mobile professional. My wife, on the other hand, feels like she’s more connected and with better access than ever before. It’s true, but she’s never used a phone for anything more than calling and the occasionally, short, rudimentary text message. Give me cut, copy, paste; push email; voice dialing; bluetooth sync w/ my MacBook Pro; 3rd party “offline” applications; faster browsing and I’m likely to be a iPhone convert.

  73. For those interested, on the earnings call Apple reported 270,000 iPhones sold in the first 30 hours.

    Their 3Q results are amazing.

  74. For those interested, on the earnings call Apple reported 270,000 iPhones sold in the first 30 hours.

    Their 3Q results are amazing.

  75. I have been a loyal Nokia for I guess 10 years now. My N95 is in the repairshop for 4 weeks.. So I never been so tempted to switch to a Windows Mobile 6 or, if it was available here in the Netherlands, the iPhone.

    I think I might have given in to my hunger for a nice touchscreen UI. I feel like Gollum…. ;-) I feel so disloyal to Nokia.. Sorry guys!

  76. I have been a loyal Nokia for I guess 10 years now. My N95 is in the repairshop for 4 weeks.. So I never been so tempted to switch to a Windows Mobile 6 or, if it was available here in the Netherlands, the iPhone.

    I think I might have given in to my hunger for a nice touchscreen UI. I feel like Gollum…. ;-) I feel so disloyal to Nokia.. Sorry guys!

  77. @47. Interesting. So, 146K out of 270K signed up for service? So almost half weren’t signed up?

  78. @47. Interesting. So, 146K out of 270K signed up for service? So almost half weren’t signed up?

  79. @50. Perhaps you have forgotten, many people couldn’t get their iPhone activated the first two days due to delays on the AT&T network. Or are you just trolling?

  80. @50. Perhaps you have forgotten, many people couldn’t get their iPhone activated the first two days due to delays on the AT&T network. Or are you just trolling?

  81. I know it sounds like a cliche, but the iPhone has changed my thinking toward what a mobile phone is. I’ve used my iPhone more in the few weeks since the launch than I used my RAZR in the entire year prior. The thing that gets me about the iPhone is how it ‘just clicks’. Doing things with the iPhone makse sense. Doing something similar on the RAZR typically didn’t (calculator, contact management, mobile web.) I’m looking forward to a proper IM client.

  82. I know it sounds like a cliche, but the iPhone has changed my thinking toward what a mobile phone is. I’ve used my iPhone more in the few weeks since the launch than I used my RAZR in the entire year prior. The thing that gets me about the iPhone is how it ‘just clicks’. Doing things with the iPhone makse sense. Doing something similar on the RAZR typically didn’t (calculator, contact management, mobile web.) I’m looking forward to a proper IM client.

  83. The Nokia N95 cost $750 bucks with virtually no storage to speak of. Yeah you can add more up to 2 gigs. More money for what is already a $750 phone. Most of the shortcomings of the iPhone can be taken care of in software. That’s $250 more than the low end iPhone & $150 dollars more than the high end iPhone. Talk about cost prohibitive. There is no comparison.

  84. The Nokia N95 cost $750 bucks with virtually no storage to speak of. Yeah you can add more up to 2 gigs. More money for what is already a $750 phone. Most of the shortcomings of the iPhone can be taken care of in software. That’s $250 more than the low end iPhone & $150 dollars more than the high end iPhone. Talk about cost prohibitive. There is no comparison.

  85. Dave Winer is citing yesterday’s news about AT&T’s 146,000 activations of iPhones in less than two days, NOT today’s news about Apple’s sales of 270,000 iPhones in the same two days. Apple’s figures are actually excellent for such a short time frame. . .if one didn’t fall for the hype of the most hysterical analysts. Typical Winer. The guy is chronically anhedonic.

  86. Dave Winer is citing yesterday’s news about AT&T’s 146,000 activations of iPhones in less than two days, NOT today’s news about Apple’s sales of 270,000 iPhones in the same two days. Apple’s figures are actually excellent for such a short time frame. . .if one didn’t fall for the hype of the most hysterical analysts. Typical Winer. The guy is chronically anhedonic.

  87. It seems like every discussion like this starts with a complaint about the development platform. I have always wondered, and have nothing to back it up, whether Apple has been successful in its small way because it likes closed environments. The iPod has always been closed. The Mac has been far more closed than the PC. Of course, Microsoft won the PC battle, but every time I work on a PC I’m reminded of the downside of opening up a platform.

    I don’t have an iPhone, and am grateful for all the early adopters. I’m hoping iPhone 2.0 will deal with the shortcomings. And I don’t care about the keyboard. I’m happy to read email on a phone, but can’t imagine doing much writing of email. Never had a Blackberry or any other smartphone.

  88. It seems like every discussion like this starts with a complaint about the development platform. I have always wondered, and have nothing to back it up, whether Apple has been successful in its small way because it likes closed environments. The iPod has always been closed. The Mac has been far more closed than the PC. Of course, Microsoft won the PC battle, but every time I work on a PC I’m reminded of the downside of opening up a platform.

    I don’t have an iPhone, and am grateful for all the early adopters. I’m hoping iPhone 2.0 will deal with the shortcomings. And I don’t care about the keyboard. I’m happy to read email on a phone, but can’t imagine doing much writing of email. Never had a Blackberry or any other smartphone.

  89. A buddy of mine had been on PTO back on 6/29 when I got the iPhone and today when he returned he asked me for a review.

    I started with the fact that the level-headed reviews were pretty spot on. The UI and user experience are unmatched and will set a new precedent against which all the others will be judged now.

    Then I went on through every nit-picky thing that should be fixed (keyboard BTW, is not one in my opinion–I took to it straight away and type better than on my Treo). This took the majority of my ‘review.’ Palm lost it here, when they should have been leading the pack with their legacy in the PDA space. (in comparison to some of the other smart phones, they probably lost it a while ago, but this is the way the Palm products used to shine before languishing with no improvements since like version 1).

    However, I concluded like this: Despite its faults and my desire for improvements, I would not give it up for any other phone out there. It is a ‘game changer’ and at the same time, a pleasure to use (on top of a remarkable software achievement). This is how things are supposed to work. And though it’s a 1.0 device, it doesn’t malfunction like a lot of 1.0 things. They got it right the first time. Not 100% right, but never the less, right.

    And yeah, 270,000 devices is a lot of product to move in 1.25 days at an average price of $550.

  90. A buddy of mine had been on PTO back on 6/29 when I got the iPhone and today when he returned he asked me for a review.

    I started with the fact that the level-headed reviews were pretty spot on. The UI and user experience are unmatched and will set a new precedent against which all the others will be judged now.

    Then I went on through every nit-picky thing that should be fixed (keyboard BTW, is not one in my opinion–I took to it straight away and type better than on my Treo). This took the majority of my ‘review.’ Palm lost it here, when they should have been leading the pack with their legacy in the PDA space. (in comparison to some of the other smart phones, they probably lost it a while ago, but this is the way the Palm products used to shine before languishing with no improvements since like version 1).

    However, I concluded like this: Despite its faults and my desire for improvements, I would not give it up for any other phone out there. It is a ‘game changer’ and at the same time, a pleasure to use (on top of a remarkable software achievement). This is how things are supposed to work. And though it’s a 1.0 device, it doesn’t malfunction like a lot of 1.0 things. They got it right the first time. Not 100% right, but never the less, right.

    And yeah, 270,000 devices is a lot of product to move in 1.25 days at an average price of $550.

  91. I’m with you on this Scoble. I also own a nokia, an e61. The memory management is really horrible on the nokia (S60), lots of leaks. I got my iphone last Friday and I’m loving it. Everything about it is so beautiful. It may not have everything, but if you really think things through, you realize that it is super optimized for the “normal” everyday users. I think they made lots of tough calls, but made plenty of the right one. All the features are just right. Some people are expecting it to replace their notebook or desktop… but It’s a mobile phone. If you really need every feature and application, get a 3G or EVDO card for your laptop, and carry that around. Have you ever tried to dial a phone number from an email on skype while driving? Apple did a fantastic job in their “first” release of a mobile phone. Exceeded my expectation. I can’t wait to buy the next version, especially the version with 3G. Apparently it is suppose to be out next year according to my reliable source at apple… P.S. you should keep your n95 as a gps unit :-) It’s handy when you travel….

  92. I’m with you on this Scoble. I also own a nokia, an e61. The memory management is really horrible on the nokia (S60), lots of leaks. I got my iphone last Friday and I’m loving it. Everything about it is so beautiful. It may not have everything, but if you really think things through, you realize that it is super optimized for the “normal” everyday users. I think they made lots of tough calls, but made plenty of the right one. All the features are just right. Some people are expecting it to replace their notebook or desktop… but It’s a mobile phone. If you really need every feature and application, get a 3G or EVDO card for your laptop, and carry that around. Have you ever tried to dial a phone number from an email on skype while driving? Apple did a fantastic job in their “first” release of a mobile phone. Exceeded my expectation. I can’t wait to buy the next version, especially the version with 3G. Apparently it is suppose to be out next year according to my reliable source at apple… P.S. you should keep your n95 as a gps unit :-) It’s handy when you travel….

  93. @53 “Dave Winer is citing yesterday’s news about AT&T’s 146,000 activations of iPhones in less than two days, NOT today’s news about Apple’s sales of 270,000 iPhones in the same two days”

    No shit! I read the article. Thanks. Never suggested otherwise.

    That still doesn’t explain what accounts for the 124K that DIDN’T get activated in those same two days. Ebay? People thought they were iPods? People waiting to activate? Would be interesting to know the total amount activated to date.

  94. @53 “Dave Winer is citing yesterday’s news about AT&T’s 146,000 activations of iPhones in less than two days, NOT today’s news about Apple’s sales of 270,000 iPhones in the same two days”

    No shit! I read the article. Thanks. Never suggested otherwise.

    That still doesn’t explain what accounts for the 124K that DIDN’T get activated in those same two days. Ebay? People thought they were iPods? People waiting to activate? Would be interesting to know the total amount activated to date.

  95. It might be interesting to know the total number iPhones activated today, but Apple ain’t gonna tell. Instead, The Steve will wait and spring some number higher than the one million projected at the end of the quarter.

    AT&T is likely getting a good chewing out. Obviously, it had a lot more problems with activation than it admitted initially. There were thousands of initial attempts stuck in the activation pipeline.

    Then, there is the whole ceremonial thing many Apple fans are into. The package must be photographed, both unopened and throughout the unpacking process. Each item inside must be examined and photographed. A shrine must be built. (Kidding? Maybe.) Friends must be invited to attend the event. Each of them will want a few minutes or more with the still unactivated iPhone. By then, the 30-hour period being focused on would have been over for many buyers.

    Other factors:

    •Gifting — Some have to be mailed, others put aside until a birthday or anniversary.

    •Procrastination — Getting the iPhone was the thing. Since most buyers already have cell phones they can wait to use their iPhone if they choose to. But, having it in hand was a must.

    •Sharing — Remember that Scoble does not own an iPhone. But, that doesn’t mean he does not have access. Multiply him by a few thousand. With two weeks to 30 days to return an iPhone there is an incentive to share until a buyer is sure.

    •The non-activators. This factor is not as important as it will become. Some buyers never had any intention of two-year bondage with AT&T if they could find a work-around and put off activation for that reason. (There are now several ways to use most of an iPhone without the two-year AT&T contract.)

  96. It might be interesting to know the total number iPhones activated today, but Apple ain’t gonna tell. Instead, The Steve will wait and spring some number higher than the one million projected at the end of the quarter.

    AT&T is likely getting a good chewing out. Obviously, it had a lot more problems with activation than it admitted initially. There were thousands of initial attempts stuck in the activation pipeline.

    Then, there is the whole ceremonial thing many Apple fans are into. The package must be photographed, both unopened and throughout the unpacking process. Each item inside must be examined and photographed. A shrine must be built. (Kidding? Maybe.) Friends must be invited to attend the event. Each of them will want a few minutes or more with the still unactivated iPhone. By then, the 30-hour period being focused on would have been over for many buyers.

    Other factors:

    •Gifting — Some have to be mailed, others put aside until a birthday or anniversary.

    •Procrastination — Getting the iPhone was the thing. Since most buyers already have cell phones they can wait to use their iPhone if they choose to. But, having it in hand was a must.

    •Sharing — Remember that Scoble does not own an iPhone. But, that doesn’t mean he does not have access. Multiply him by a few thousand. With two weeks to 30 days to return an iPhone there is an incentive to share until a buyer is sure.

    •The non-activators. This factor is not as important as it will become. Some buyers never had any intention of two-year bondage with AT&T if they could find a work-around and put off activation for that reason. (There are now several ways to use most of an iPhone without the two-year AT&T contract.)

  97. “That still doesn’t explain what accounts for the 124K that DIDN’T get activated in those same two days.”

    100+k could have bought their phones on Saturday afternoon and didn’t activate after the quarter ended.

    you and others are taking this two day period as a test.

    It’s just a freakin arbitrary deadline.

  98. “That still doesn’t explain what accounts for the 124K that DIDN’T get activated in those same two days.”

    100+k could have bought their phones on Saturday afternoon and didn’t activate after the quarter ended.

    you and others are taking this two day period as a test.

    It’s just a freakin arbitrary deadline.

  99. I love my iPhone. So far, it is by far the best phone I have owned.

    For one, it is just rock solid, physically feels great. I have been using my phone mostly for data for nearly 7 years now (yup, I’m an early, early adopter in that regard) and the experience on the iPhone is by far the best.

    One little feature I love – multi-tasking. I can open up an email (I use gmail on web not the built in email) and switch between an email with someone’s phone number and the dialpad – and enter & correct what I just entered.

    Visual Voicemail also was a lifesaver today on the MeshWalk – I could just pull up messages as I wanted, no more waiting through prompts, listening to old messages before I could hear my new ones, and rewinding (or fast fowarding) is a simple flick. Amazing – simple sure – but also really productivity enhancing. I have been avoiding voicemail for years due to frustrations with it – this is so nice I don’t mind getting voicemails now.

    Wifi when I need speed is also really great (I mostly use it on my secured home network).

    And I still get a smile on my face when things just work – the applications people are coming out with now are also really nice. I’m enjoying being able to play some embedded videos from webpages (has to be quicktime and in the right format – but still – really, really nice)

    The sensors are all also great – the light sensor does help adjust the screen brightness – though it does it without much fuss I do notice that in most cases the screen is really readable. The sensor that detects when the phone is by my ear is also great – and quick to revert back when needed (to use the keypad for example).

    Do I have some complaints? A few, mostly minor.

    - I’d love to be able to program my own ringtones (I’m assuming this may come with a software update in the future)

    - occasionally Safari will crash. But unlike my Windows Mobile device – a crash rarely means I have to do anything more than just relaunch Safari (though if I have unsaved work somewhere I might have lost it) On the the other hand, I love being able to just open up multiple pages and switch between them – really, really cool.

    In short, I am really happy to have the iphone and use it, I’m adjusting to it, figuring out if I want to use a case or not etc (I do like having it in my pocket so the vibrate is easy to detect)

    Shannon

  100. I love my iPhone. So far, it is by far the best phone I have owned.

    For one, it is just rock solid, physically feels great. I have been using my phone mostly for data for nearly 7 years now (yup, I’m an early, early adopter in that regard) and the experience on the iPhone is by far the best.

    One little feature I love – multi-tasking. I can open up an email (I use gmail on web not the built in email) and switch between an email with someone’s phone number and the dialpad – and enter & correct what I just entered.

    Visual Voicemail also was a lifesaver today on the MeshWalk – I could just pull up messages as I wanted, no more waiting through prompts, listening to old messages before I could hear my new ones, and rewinding (or fast fowarding) is a simple flick. Amazing – simple sure – but also really productivity enhancing. I have been avoiding voicemail for years due to frustrations with it – this is so nice I don’t mind getting voicemails now.

    Wifi when I need speed is also really great (I mostly use it on my secured home network).

    And I still get a smile on my face when things just work – the applications people are coming out with now are also really nice. I’m enjoying being able to play some embedded videos from webpages (has to be quicktime and in the right format – but still – really, really nice)

    The sensors are all also great – the light sensor does help adjust the screen brightness – though it does it without much fuss I do notice that in most cases the screen is really readable. The sensor that detects when the phone is by my ear is also great – and quick to revert back when needed (to use the keypad for example).

    Do I have some complaints? A few, mostly minor.

    - I’d love to be able to program my own ringtones (I’m assuming this may come with a software update in the future)

    - occasionally Safari will crash. But unlike my Windows Mobile device – a crash rarely means I have to do anything more than just relaunch Safari (though if I have unsaved work somewhere I might have lost it) On the the other hand, I love being able to just open up multiple pages and switch between them – really, really cool.

    In short, I am really happy to have the iphone and use it, I’m adjusting to it, figuring out if I want to use a case or not etc (I do like having it in my pocket so the vibrate is easy to detect)

    Shannon

  101. For about 5 bucks, AT&T enable voicemail dialing for the iPhone. With address book and all those goodies.

  102. For about 5 bucks, AT&T enable voicemail dialing for the iPhone. With address book and all those goodies.

  103. I saw your son on NBC this morning and he was absolutly gushing about the Iphone..

  104. I have to get this out of the way before I rant and rave about my iPhone. I love reading your blog. I actually can make sense of the technical rantings that I previously had no knowledge about. Thanks.

    So, on to the iPhone. I bought 2 the day after it came out. One of the 4GB and one 8GB, which boils down to one for me, and one for the fiance. I have to admit that I use the iPhone for a music player and whatnot MORE frequently than I EVER used my iPod. The simple fact that it’s an all-in-one device really makes me glad I dropped so much money to have one. Sure, the camera is a little lacking, BUT when it all comes down to it (and when you don’t have a more appropriate camera…) it’s perfect for catching those moments you’d miss otherwise. A simple click and it’s there and one more and you’ve got a picture. The quality is fine for just that. If you want professional pictures, take them with a professional camera.

    The GPS is something that doesn’t bother me. But I’ve heard rumors that Apple will come out with a new iPhone that has GPS capabilities. I’m happy with Google Maps.

    So, it’s safe to say that I’m coming down on the side of the iPhone, and after only a month, I’m more than satisfied. Let’s see what happens after month number 2.

  105. I have to get this out of the way before I rant and rave about my iPhone. I love reading your blog. I actually can make sense of the technical rantings that I previously had no knowledge about. Thanks.

    So, on to the iPhone. I bought 2 the day after it came out. One of the 4GB and one 8GB, which boils down to one for me, and one for the fiance. I have to admit that I use the iPhone for a music player and whatnot MORE frequently than I EVER used my iPod. The simple fact that it’s an all-in-one device really makes me glad I dropped so much money to have one. Sure, the camera is a little lacking, BUT when it all comes down to it (and when you don’t have a more appropriate camera…) it’s perfect for catching those moments you’d miss otherwise. A simple click and it’s there and one more and you’ve got a picture. The quality is fine for just that. If you want professional pictures, take them with a professional camera.

    The GPS is something that doesn’t bother me. But I’ve heard rumors that Apple will come out with a new iPhone that has GPS capabilities. I’m happy with Google Maps.

    So, it’s safe to say that I’m coming down on the side of the iPhone, and after only a month, I’m more than satisfied. Let’s see what happens after month number 2.

  106. Exploiting Patrick? It’s not like they are taking him into the back closet. CNBC is an opportunity not iPhone’s gone wild.

  107. Exploiting Patrick? It’s not like they are taking him into the back closet. CNBC is an opportunity not iPhone’s gone wild.

  108. I dont like the iPhone web access (except for goog maps), though in the beginning, i thought it was kool. I like my windows mobile better. For example i want to read news on NY Times, it is just so much effort on iphone to open it, then pinch the page to zoom it. I almost always accidentally click on a link, trying to pinch it.

    Though windows mobile has limited web viewing, for exaple, NYTimes mobile version looks good and exactly fits on the screen. It just lists major headlines and then links to each section, I can just scroll it down with one hand and keep reading it (useful, say if i am standing in a line and am holding a drink in the other hand :))

    I know I will sound a spoilsport, but I am not happy with the iphone :(

  109. I dont like the iPhone web access (except for goog maps), though in the beginning, i thought it was kool. I like my windows mobile better. For example i want to read news on NY Times, it is just so much effort on iphone to open it, then pinch the page to zoom it. I almost always accidentally click on a link, trying to pinch it.

    Though windows mobile has limited web viewing, for exaple, NYTimes mobile version looks good and exactly fits on the screen. It just lists major headlines and then links to each section, I can just scroll it down with one hand and keep reading it (useful, say if i am standing in a line and am holding a drink in the other hand :))

    I know I will sound a spoilsport, but I am not happy with the iphone :(

  110. We did a roundup of “iphone icon portal” sites which are a nice way on the iphone to have access to a couple hundred websites and “mini-apps” with an extra tap. By replicating the home page look & feel, it’s much better than having a text link. It’s actually quite nice – not perfect as there is no site with access to the nearly 400 of these sites just yet but enough choices out there …

    http://2aday.wordpress.com/2007/07/26/iphone-mini-apps-major-update-4-weeks-400-mini-apps/

  111. We did a roundup of “iphone icon portal” sites which are a nice way on the iphone to have access to a couple hundred websites and “mini-apps” with an extra tap. By replicating the home page look & feel, it’s much better than having a text link. It’s actually quite nice – not perfect as there is no site with access to the nearly 400 of these sites just yet but enough choices out there …

    http://2aday.wordpress.com/2007/07/26/iphone-mini-apps-major-update-4-weeks-400-mini-apps/

  112. “But I agree with the assessment about “most people”. The simple fact is that the iPhone is not built for the early adopters – it’s built for the masses. ”

    At $600 I don’t think it targets “the masses”. It targets the wealthy that wand a symbol of status/style. It’s like wrist watches. The expensive stylish ones are made of gold but have no numbers. The cheap ones have no style, but have loads of features (reminds me of a scene from the movie U-Turn). Both serve different purposes. But the Blackberry targets “the masses” much more than the iPhone does.

  113. “But I agree with the assessment about “most people”. The simple fact is that the iPhone is not built for the early adopters – it’s built for the masses. ”

    At $600 I don’t think it targets “the masses”. It targets the wealthy that wand a symbol of status/style. It’s like wrist watches. The expensive stylish ones are made of gold but have no numbers. The cheap ones have no style, but have loads of features (reminds me of a scene from the movie U-Turn). Both serve different purposes. But the Blackberry targets “the masses” much more than the iPhone does.

  114. Am I missing something here? Why would I use a minor application like Google maps when I have GPS on my N95? As for clicks, once the navigation is running I don’t have to click on the phone at all – especially not dangerously when I’m driving. Frankly, using Google Maps when driving by yourself is both dangerous and dumb.

    Just thought I’d point that out.

  115. Am I missing something here? Why would I use a minor application like Google maps when I have GPS on my N95? As for clicks, once the navigation is running I don’t have to click on the phone at all – especially not dangerously when I’m driving. Frankly, using Google Maps when driving by yourself is both dangerous and dumb.

    Just thought I’d point that out.

  116. Scoble- ever tried to move icons around in S60? Try it, it’s genius. 11 clicks? wtf is wrong with you? Anyway- yay for google maps. TomTom is up and running, navigating away in two clicks. You can click away all day long, and TomTom, nor Wayfinder, nor MGMaps, nor Route66, nor MobileNavigator7 nor ANYTHING other than Google Maps is going to come up. So again, yay for google maps. I guess if you don’t know anything, you don’t miss out on it.

    #53- Most N95′s were shipped with 1 GB cards- and it’s not limited to 2gb- that’s a lie. Even Nokia sells 4gb cards. 8gb cards are on the horizon, and I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to be copying data to my 32GB microsd card before the middle of next year. By the end of next year, the iPhone is going to be a 4 or 8gb joke to the smartphone world.

    The iPhone is wonderful if you’re coming from a razr, if you’re confused by gadgets that will perform more than three functions, or if you’re just easily impressed by a pretty bright screen. If you’re coming from S60 and found it too difficult to operate, you obviously need a phone without buttons.

    Yippie for misinformation. Cheers, Scoble.

  117. Scoble- ever tried to move icons around in S60? Try it, it’s genius. 11 clicks? wtf is wrong with you? Anyway- yay for google maps. TomTom is up and running, navigating away in two clicks. You can click away all day long, and TomTom, nor Wayfinder, nor MGMaps, nor Route66, nor MobileNavigator7 nor ANYTHING other than Google Maps is going to come up. So again, yay for google maps. I guess if you don’t know anything, you don’t miss out on it.

    #53- Most N95′s were shipped with 1 GB cards- and it’s not limited to 2gb- that’s a lie. Even Nokia sells 4gb cards. 8gb cards are on the horizon, and I wouldn’t be a bit surprised to be copying data to my 32GB microsd card before the middle of next year. By the end of next year, the iPhone is going to be a 4 or 8gb joke to the smartphone world.

    The iPhone is wonderful if you’re coming from a razr, if you’re confused by gadgets that will perform more than three functions, or if you’re just easily impressed by a pretty bright screen. If you’re coming from S60 and found it too difficult to operate, you obviously need a phone without buttons.

    Yippie for misinformation. Cheers, Scoble.

  118. Seems the Nokia zealots are back. They’re like parents trying to convince themselves their ugly child is strikingly handsome.

  119. Seems the Nokia zealots are back. They’re like parents trying to convince themselves their ugly child is strikingly handsome.

  120. Like my iPhone a lot. Used a Blackberry for years prior, in a three different incarnations.

    One thing I wanted to mention about Edge: sure 3G is cool, but a wireless network isn’t much good if it isn’t available. I was on Edge grabbing email and checking DIgg in the middle of nowhere on the outskirts of Shawnee, OK the other day. Nice.

    I imagine a version will come that overs 3G+Edge support soon enough. Perhaps the network will catch up enough to make it useful by then. For now, I think Apple’s decision about Edge was the correct one.

  121. Like my iPhone a lot. Used a Blackberry for years prior, in a three different incarnations.

    One thing I wanted to mention about Edge: sure 3G is cool, but a wireless network isn’t much good if it isn’t available. I was on Edge grabbing email and checking DIgg in the middle of nowhere on the outskirts of Shawnee, OK the other day. Nice.

    I imagine a version will come that overs 3G+Edge support soon enough. Perhaps the network will catch up enough to make it useful by then. For now, I think Apple’s decision about Edge was the correct one.

  122. Three cheers to misinformation,

    “The iPhone is wonderful if you’re coming from a razr, if you’re confused by gadgets that will perform more than three functions, or if you’re just easily impressed by a pretty bright screen.”

    Don’t you Apple-bashers ever get tired of the same old “arguments” 20 years after the fact? Being easy to use is an ADVANTAGE, not a negative. A bright screen is an ADVANTAGE, not a negative. The fact that most people can actually use all the features the iPhone offers is an ADVANTAGE, not a negative.

    You can pat yourself on the back all you want for apparently knowing how to work your phone, but the N95 is nothing more than a great camera at the core of a very unspectacular smartphone. It’s a one-trick pony. Period.

    Since you (and Nokia) haven’t figured it out, let me explain it to you: Building simplicity into a complex device is hard. Apple excels at it.

    The fact is your 1987-type Macintosh arguments making fun of the device’s simplicity won’t wash for most people 20 years later in 2007. Please come back when you have something better.

  123. Three cheers to misinformation,

    “The iPhone is wonderful if you’re coming from a razr, if you’re confused by gadgets that will perform more than three functions, or if you’re just easily impressed by a pretty bright screen.”

    Don’t you Apple-bashers ever get tired of the same old “arguments” 20 years after the fact? Being easy to use is an ADVANTAGE, not a negative. A bright screen is an ADVANTAGE, not a negative. The fact that most people can actually use all the features the iPhone offers is an ADVANTAGE, not a negative.

    You can pat yourself on the back all you want for apparently knowing how to work your phone, but the N95 is nothing more than a great camera at the core of a very unspectacular smartphone. It’s a one-trick pony. Period.

    Since you (and Nokia) haven’t figured it out, let me explain it to you: Building simplicity into a complex device is hard. Apple excels at it.

    The fact is your 1987-type Macintosh arguments making fun of the device’s simplicity won’t wash for most people 20 years later in 2007. Please come back when you have something better.

  124. Hello friend of scobleizer!

    My name is Kenji Nakamura, when reading you blog I see you are interested in the new apple phone,
    the iphone.

    I am admin of the challenge iNeedmyPost, in which the prizes are iphones. The rules are simple create a post in our blog and get many views.

    It will be an honor if you entered. Find us in http://ineedmypost.com

    Bye! Kenji Nakamura. (Sorry if this seems spam XP)

  125. Hello friend of scobleizer!

    My name is Kenji Nakamura, when reading you blog I see you are interested in the new apple phone,
    the iphone.

    I am admin of the challenge iNeedmyPost, in which the prizes are iphones. The rules are simple create a post in our blog and get many views.

    It will be an honor if you entered. Find us in http://ineedmypost.com

    Bye! Kenji Nakamura. (Sorry if this seems spam XP)

  126. “Seems the Nokia zealots are back. They’re like parents trying to convince themselves their ugly child is strikingly handsome.”

    No, not really. I’m just asking what the fact that it takes more clicks to access Google Maps on the N95 than the iPhone has to do with anything when GM is a minor application on the N95 which, as we know, has GPS and Sat Nav. It’s an apples and oranges comparison.

    Personally, I respect Robert’s opinion. I don’t agree with it but clearly the iPhone suits him better than the N95. What I do find slightly unfair though is the focus on the bits he likes without acknowledging what the N95 does better.

    As for your comment, we could also argue that owners of the iPhone are akin to parents trying to convince themselves that their child is smarter than he or she actually is.

    But hey ho, fanboyism is kind of a pointless exercise, isn’t it?

    Like this, for example:

    “You can pat yourself on the back all you want for apparently knowing how to work your phone, but the N95 is nothing more than a great camera at the core of a very unspectacular smartphone. It’s a one-trick pony. Period.”

    Well, no. No it isn’t actually. The N95 does a number of things better than the iPhone – or indeed other smartphones – just as the iPhone does some things better than the N95. Those of us who aren’t blindly – and, frankly, illogically – attached to any particular company realise this.

    At the moment I prefer the N95 for what it does, Robert prefers the iPhone. It’s all good.

  127. “Seems the Nokia zealots are back. They’re like parents trying to convince themselves their ugly child is strikingly handsome.”

    No, not really. I’m just asking what the fact that it takes more clicks to access Google Maps on the N95 than the iPhone has to do with anything when GM is a minor application on the N95 which, as we know, has GPS and Sat Nav. It’s an apples and oranges comparison.

    Personally, I respect Robert’s opinion. I don’t agree with it but clearly the iPhone suits him better than the N95. What I do find slightly unfair though is the focus on the bits he likes without acknowledging what the N95 does better.

    As for your comment, we could also argue that owners of the iPhone are akin to parents trying to convince themselves that their child is smarter than he or she actually is.

    But hey ho, fanboyism is kind of a pointless exercise, isn’t it?

    Like this, for example:

    “You can pat yourself on the back all you want for apparently knowing how to work your phone, but the N95 is nothing more than a great camera at the core of a very unspectacular smartphone. It’s a one-trick pony. Period.”

    Well, no. No it isn’t actually. The N95 does a number of things better than the iPhone – or indeed other smartphones – just as the iPhone does some things better than the N95. Those of us who aren’t blindly – and, frankly, illogically – attached to any particular company realise this.

    At the moment I prefer the N95 for what it does, Robert prefers the iPhone. It’s all good.

  128. Ready to Embark on the Mobile 2.0 Bandwagon? Now Is the Time!

    Here is a weblog post where I am sharing some further thoughts on some recent piece of news around the mobile market and how the transition to a Mobile 2.0 may have just gotten started in full force, specially now that more and more knowledge workers a…

  129. The number disparity between ATT and Apple are very simple. ATT year end was Saturday. Apple Year End was Sunday. 30 hours vs 54 hours. Someone had to look closely to figure it out but that is why they are called analysts.

    Waiting for the iPhone in Canada.

  130. The number disparity between ATT and Apple are very simple. ATT year end was Saturday. Apple Year End was Sunday. 30 hours vs 54 hours. Someone had to look closely to figure it out but that is why they are called analysts.

    Waiting for the iPhone in Canada.

  131. I agree with Mark. I’m a n95 user, and I agree the iphone is cool… but it does annoy me when Scoble makes ridiculous (and intellectually dishonest) comparisons.

    I don’t need google maps on the n95; I have a far superior gps based product that shows me where I am in real time. I don’t need to look at it when I’m driving; I have a voice direction system that tells me when to turn left or right – better, and safer, than using Google maps for directions.

    It’s clearly better… but Scoble here is pretending it doesn’t even exist (maybe he doesnt know how to use it, yet?) – and running down the n95 because it takes so many clicks (actually not 11, untrue again, it can be set up as a 1-click app on the desktop just like the iphone) to access Google maps.

    Like most n95 users, I don’t use Google maps. I have something much, much better.

    Doesnt mean the iphone isn’t cooler. Doesnt mean the n95 has problems (it does).

    But Robert here is being deliberately misleading, IMHO.

    Scoble, you are free to choose the iphone over the n95 for many reasons. But at least be honest.

    I used to respect Scoble’s opinion. That’s changing, right now.

  132. I agree with Mark. I’m a n95 user, and I agree the iphone is cool… but it does annoy me when Scoble makes ridiculous (and intellectually dishonest) comparisons.

    I don’t need google maps on the n95; I have a far superior gps based product that shows me where I am in real time. I don’t need to look at it when I’m driving; I have a voice direction system that tells me when to turn left or right – better, and safer, than using Google maps for directions.

    It’s clearly better… but Scoble here is pretending it doesn’t even exist (maybe he doesnt know how to use it, yet?) – and running down the n95 because it takes so many clicks (actually not 11, untrue again, it can be set up as a 1-click app on the desktop just like the iphone) to access Google maps.

    Like most n95 users, I don’t use Google maps. I have something much, much better.

    Doesnt mean the iphone isn’t cooler. Doesnt mean the n95 has problems (it does).

    But Robert here is being deliberately misleading, IMHO.

    Scoble, you are free to choose the iphone over the n95 for many reasons. But at least be honest.

    I used to respect Scoble’s opinion. That’s changing, right now.

  133. Geoffrey, Google Maps accomplish the same goal on the iPhone as GPS on the iPhone — directing the driver to his destination. To claim that GPS puts the N95 over the iPhone is disingenuous. The sole excellent feature the N95 has is its camera and that is not enough to convince most consumers to buy a $750 phone — that they would then have to pay to add memory and programs to.

  134. Geoffrey, Google Maps accomplish the same goal on the iPhone as GPS on the iPhone — directing the driver to his destination. To claim that GPS puts the N95 over the iPhone is disingenuous. The sole excellent feature the N95 has is its camera and that is not enough to convince most consumers to buy a $750 phone — that they would then have to pay to add memory and programs to.

  135. Yeah – i really wanted the iphone but i am a serious pda guy and here its more for the “other” gadgets! Its great for all the ipod and apple stuff but PDA peeps will want more – though its hard to ignore the use of a full web browser!

  136. Yeah – i really wanted the iphone but i am a serious pda guy and here its more for the “other” gadgets! Its great for all the ipod and apple stuff but PDA peeps will want more – though its hard to ignore the use of a full web browser!

  137. I loved my iPhone for the most part… the things that it did, it did really well… and of course the UI was gorgeous and fun to play with. Sadly, though, I did miss some of the features of my Treo 755p (such as sending/receiving multimedia messages, recording video, etc.)… not to mention that Sprint’s network was FAR faster, and feature-for-feature my plan with Sprint is much cheaper and more powerful.

    So today, with 2 days left in my 30 day trial period, I called up Sprint and ported my number back over to them. A bittersweet moment, to be sure, but I think I made the right choice.

    I’m confident that Apple will someday realize that tying itself to one carrier was a REALLY bad idea, and make it available with more carriers. That, combined with some much-needed feature updates (even simple things like the ability to filter and search e-mail), could definitely bring me back.

  138. I loved my iPhone for the most part… the things that it did, it did really well… and of course the UI was gorgeous and fun to play with. Sadly, though, I did miss some of the features of my Treo 755p (such as sending/receiving multimedia messages, recording video, etc.)… not to mention that Sprint’s network was FAR faster, and feature-for-feature my plan with Sprint is much cheaper and more powerful.

    So today, with 2 days left in my 30 day trial period, I called up Sprint and ported my number back over to them. A bittersweet moment, to be sure, but I think I made the right choice.

    I’m confident that Apple will someday realize that tying itself to one carrier was a REALLY bad idea, and make it available with more carriers. That, combined with some much-needed feature updates (even simple things like the ability to filter and search e-mail), could definitely bring me back.

  139. 87- You obviously know dick about the N95.

    Your comments are the absolute pinnacle of ignorance.

    I especially like the comment about adding memory and programs to the N95. How does the iPhone handle these feats?

  140. 87- You obviously know dick about the N95.

    Your comments are the absolute pinnacle of ignorance.

    I especially like the comment about adding memory and programs to the N95. How does the iPhone handle these feats?

  141. People usually stick with what they already use.

    Hi Robert, Ed Garay, here.

    Let’s just say that I only browse, read/write emails, Twitter and other text messages while I am driving when I find myself idle, waiting for the green light and at railroad crossings and traffic jams ;-) but that aside, I still make use of one-hand smartphone operation throughout my daily mobile life… but my aging eyes truly appreciate the extra screen real estate vacated by a physical thumb keyboard on the iPhone.

    Those double buts, above, are hints to my dilemma: I like the iPhone an awful lot and I love its big bright beautiful screen, but I have been and would like to continue been a Windows Mobile smartphone user, not just for those one-handed mobile Internet moments at traffic red lights, but because I am used to having my contacts, calendar, voice notes, files and all in sync with all my Tablet PCs, notebooks and my good old iPaq.

    That iPhone screen and UI are very appealing but I am holding back until the Motorola Q 9h hits the streets of Chicago, not just for the full QWERTY keyboard but for a plethora of reasons: HSDPA high-speed Internet, stereo Bluetooth, MP3, AAC audio *and* WMA, MPEG-4 and H.264 video *plus* WMV and H.263, replaceable microSD storage and battery.

    The Web is beautiful on the iPhone, but it is not too bad either on the Windows Mobile smartphones. People usually stick with what they like and what they already use, so if I get an iPhone instead of the Moto Q 9h (or some other WM6 smartphone) I will miss Windows Outlook Mobile (not just for Exchange but for IMAP and POP), and I will miss Voice Notes for recording lectures, interviews, voice reminders, ad nauseum; I will miss Windows Media Player Mobile as well as seamlessly opening attachments in Word, PowerPoint or Excel. (I don’t currently use Windows Mobile VPN, but I might), and if I have HSDPA, I don’t need Wi-Fi.

    So, I continue to ponder this inherent question: do I spend $200 and get that new super-fast Windows Mobile 6 smartphone that I already know I like, or do I spend $600 and get that Apple phone, not so fast, not so open, but with that nice big screen and lots of other new candy. Afterall, stereo Bluetooth, voice recording, WMA audio, MS-office attachments and some such could just be a firmware upgrade or two away, right?

    So it boils down to physical stuff, like HSDPA electronics, replaceable batteries and memory cards, and an (optional) keyboard with real button for those idle moments during my daily commute.

    Stay tuned. I shall make my mind by the end of August at the latest. In the mean time, Robert, give me a call next time you are in Chicago. I will drive you around Chicago, safety first, of course. ;-)
    — Ed

  142. People usually stick with what they already use.

    Hi Robert, Ed Garay, here.

    Let’s just say that I only browse, read/write emails, Twitter and other text messages while I am driving when I find myself idle, waiting for the green light and at railroad crossings and traffic jams ;-) but that aside, I still make use of one-hand smartphone operation throughout my daily mobile life… but my aging eyes truly appreciate the extra screen real estate vacated by a physical thumb keyboard on the iPhone.

    Those double buts, above, are hints to my dilemma: I like the iPhone an awful lot and I love its big bright beautiful screen, but I have been and would like to continue been a Windows Mobile smartphone user, not just for those one-handed mobile Internet moments at traffic red lights, but because I am used to having my contacts, calendar, voice notes, files and all in sync with all my Tablet PCs, notebooks and my good old iPaq.

    That iPhone screen and UI are very appealing but I am holding back until the Motorola Q 9h hits the streets of Chicago, not just for the full QWERTY keyboard but for a plethora of reasons: HSDPA high-speed Internet, stereo Bluetooth, MP3, AAC audio *and* WMA, MPEG-4 and H.264 video *plus* WMV and H.263, replaceable microSD storage and battery.

    The Web is beautiful on the iPhone, but it is not too bad either on the Windows Mobile smartphones. People usually stick with what they like and what they already use, so if I get an iPhone instead of the Moto Q 9h (or some other WM6 smartphone) I will miss Windows Outlook Mobile (not just for Exchange but for IMAP and POP), and I will miss Voice Notes for recording lectures, interviews, voice reminders, ad nauseum; I will miss Windows Media Player Mobile as well as seamlessly opening attachments in Word, PowerPoint or Excel. (I don’t currently use Windows Mobile VPN, but I might), and if I have HSDPA, I don’t need Wi-Fi.

    So, I continue to ponder this inherent question: do I spend $200 and get that new super-fast Windows Mobile 6 smartphone that I already know I like, or do I spend $600 and get that Apple phone, not so fast, not so open, but with that nice big screen and lots of other new candy. Afterall, stereo Bluetooth, voice recording, WMA audio, MS-office attachments and some such could just be a firmware upgrade or two away, right?

    So it boils down to physical stuff, like HSDPA electronics, replaceable batteries and memory cards, and an (optional) keyboard with real button for those idle moments during my daily commute.

    Stay tuned. I shall make my mind by the end of August at the latest. In the mean time, Robert, give me a call next time you are in Chicago. I will drive you around Chicago, safety first, of course. ;-)
    — Ed

  143. I agree with Scoble everyone is going to be biased towards their personal favorite device. Why? Because “Smartphones” are still in their infancies and can’t please everyone. Yet.

    Personally I can’t stand Windows Mobile 5 or 6 but love Blackberry because of the simplicity of use and ease of email functionality. However multimedia sucks on it. This doesn’t mean I hate Microsoft or talk bad about users who use their Mobile products. They WILL mature.

    Although my major complaint about my new iPhone is lack of support for Exchange is how it still handles internet email. (I haven’t heard anyone else mention this) But my problem is how it doesn’t cache or download the emails. For instance if someone sends me an email with several pictures and I want to show someone later I have to wait again for it to load all over again. Annoying!

    These sort of quirks I am confident will be worked out with software updates from Apple.

    I think people should lighten up about all the negativity because NO smartphone suits everyone. Personally I think they ALL have their limitations.

  144. I agree with Scoble everyone is going to be biased towards their personal favorite device. Why? Because “Smartphones” are still in their infancies and can’t please everyone. Yet.

    Personally I can’t stand Windows Mobile 5 or 6 but love Blackberry because of the simplicity of use and ease of email functionality. However multimedia sucks on it. This doesn’t mean I hate Microsoft or talk bad about users who use their Mobile products. They WILL mature.

    Although my major complaint about my new iPhone is lack of support for Exchange is how it still handles internet email. (I haven’t heard anyone else mention this) But my problem is how it doesn’t cache or download the emails. For instance if someone sends me an email with several pictures and I want to show someone later I have to wait again for it to load all over again. Annoying!

    These sort of quirks I am confident will be worked out with software updates from Apple.

    I think people should lighten up about all the negativity because NO smartphone suits everyone. Personally I think they ALL have their limitations.

  145. Podesta …

    >>> “Geoffrey, Google Maps accomplish the same goal on the iPhone as GPS on the iPhone — directing the driver to his destination. To claim that GPS puts the N95 over the iPhone is disingenuous. ”
    Comment by Podesta — July 27, 2007 @ 5:59 pm

    You are perfectly right in your first statement. Google Maps (sans GPS) vs NokiaMaps (based on GPS) are obviously, ways of accomplishing the same goal – finding your way around – on two different machines.

    One, – Nokia Maps – simply happens to be light years ahead of the other – Google Maps on the iphone. Realtime directions are better than guesswork, period. Knowing where you are is much better to hoping you’ve read the map right, period. Being told by voice, to turn, 200 yards ahead of the turn, all without having to take your eyes off the road, is obviously far better than desperately trying to read the road sign at 40mph while reading your iphone at the same time. Period.

    It isn’t disingenuous to say that gps based mapping is better than non-gps-based mapping. It’s just the truth.

    I never said – ever! – that gps alone make the n95 better than the iphone. In fact, I never – ever! -said the n95 is better than the iphone. They are two very different machines.

    So at no point was I being ‘disingenuous’ at all. On the other hand, I did point out that Scoble was being *extraordinarily* disingenuous to compare the n95 to the iphone over the issue of Google maps – and never mentioned the superior n95 gps system at all. That’s a little more than disingenuous, that’s outright misleading.

  146. Podesta …

    >>> “Geoffrey, Google Maps accomplish the same goal on the iPhone as GPS on the iPhone — directing the driver to his destination. To claim that GPS puts the N95 over the iPhone is disingenuous. ”
    Comment by Podesta — July 27, 2007 @ 5:59 pm

    You are perfectly right in your first statement. Google Maps (sans GPS) vs NokiaMaps (based on GPS) are obviously, ways of accomplishing the same goal – finding your way around – on two different machines.

    One, – Nokia Maps – simply happens to be light years ahead of the other – Google Maps on the iphone. Realtime directions are better than guesswork, period. Knowing where you are is much better to hoping you’ve read the map right, period. Being told by voice, to turn, 200 yards ahead of the turn, all without having to take your eyes off the road, is obviously far better than desperately trying to read the road sign at 40mph while reading your iphone at the same time. Period.

    It isn’t disingenuous to say that gps based mapping is better than non-gps-based mapping. It’s just the truth.

    I never said – ever! – that gps alone make the n95 better than the iphone. In fact, I never – ever! -said the n95 is better than the iphone. They are two very different machines.

    So at no point was I being ‘disingenuous’ at all. On the other hand, I did point out that Scoble was being *extraordinarily* disingenuous to compare the n95 to the iphone over the issue of Google maps – and never mentioned the superior n95 gps system at all. That’s a little more than disingenuous, that’s outright misleading.

  147. First time I started doubt Robert’s professionalism is this article and his comments made here.

    He doesn’t have to like his Nokia N95, but just plain trashing it without any justification (11 clicks??) and not understanding why others would prefer it makes him just an ordinary fan boy all forums are full of.

    Such a shame.

  148. First time I started doubt Robert’s professionalism is this article and his comments made here.

    He doesn’t have to like his Nokia N95, but just plain trashing it without any justification (11 clicks??) and not understanding why others would prefer it makes him just an ordinary fan boy all forums are full of.

    Such a shame.

  149. I don’t know why some people take cell phone preferences so personally. There are more variety of reasons to chose a phone than to chose a computer system. Me? I think the iPhone is highway robbery. Is it nice? yes, great UI? yes. But it doesn’t do very basic stuff and I have install Java apps in my phones since 2001. Luckily for me I travel enough to be able to get an N95 for 380$ (subsidized by a foreign operator I do business with). It will be locked, but I can unlocked it. I think the iPhone is just a fad.

  150. I don’t know why some people take cell phone preferences so personally. There are more variety of reasons to chose a phone than to chose a computer system. Me? I think the iPhone is highway robbery. Is it nice? yes, great UI? yes. But it doesn’t do very basic stuff and I have install Java apps in my phones since 2001. Luckily for me I travel enough to be able to get an N95 for 380$ (subsidized by a foreign operator I do business with). It will be locked, but I can unlocked it. I think the iPhone is just a fad.

  151. My two-penn’orth: I got an N95 when they came out. Was wowed and overjoyed until my first out of memory error. Now, the joy of showing people a super high res picture I just took is ruined by having to reboot before I show them…

    Same for the GPS. Nice to know where I am… but waiting 5 minutes to pick up a satellite and then having the battery die is not cool.

    Never managed to get streaming media working.
    It inexplicably misses text to speech on its feature list despite having the capability (as it reads out who is calling me).
    And what the hell is the barcode reader for? Anyone got that working?

    On the other hand, I got a Newton Messagepad 100, a 110 and then a 120. I still use the MP120… if it had a phone built in and wi-fi I probably wouldn’t use my N95 at all.

    So I’m getting an iPhone.

  152. My two-penn’orth: I got an N95 when they came out. Was wowed and overjoyed until my first out of memory error. Now, the joy of showing people a super high res picture I just took is ruined by having to reboot before I show them…

    Same for the GPS. Nice to know where I am… but waiting 5 minutes to pick up a satellite and then having the battery die is not cool.

    Never managed to get streaming media working.
    It inexplicably misses text to speech on its feature list despite having the capability (as it reads out who is calling me).
    And what the hell is the barcode reader for? Anyone got that working?

    On the other hand, I got a Newton Messagepad 100, a 110 and then a 120. I still use the MP120… if it had a phone built in and wi-fi I probably wouldn’t use my N95 at all.

    So I’m getting an iPhone.

  153. I noticed something here, like the last sam( number 99), most people who bought an n95 find it “complicated”? Like that “out of memory” error and long GPS lock – those are already solved and eliminated by the latest firmware upgrade. (So this means that noone here takes the time to upgrade?)

    I like the iPhone – but having a wonderful UI (touchscreen and menu) just doesnt do it for me. I mean, you cant even customize the menu, make an mp3 into a ringtone, change icons, or take a video. The iPhone is great – when you’re playing around with it, but aside from email and browsing, what else can you do with it? It has no 3G or HSDPA, it has no MMS, no way to share stuff with another phone or connect to a TV or multimedia speakers – it’s just too limited, it lacks substance.

    I’ve always been fond of simple things, and this simplicity of the iPhone’s menu, endears it to most users – as they say, even a 10 year old can operate it. I agree wholeheartedly on that. But will I pay 599 dollars to use such a menu? 599 for an iPod with a screen? It doesn’t even have A2DP (stereo bluetooth) – so how great would it be on wireless music?

    Granted that the n95 or any other smartphone will never be as easy to use as the iPhone…. those other phones gives you substance (features) that’s really useful in real life. Other smartphones are NOT just a good menu, a large touchscreen, and storage of songs – they are so much more.

  154. I noticed something here, like the last sam( number 99), most people who bought an n95 find it “complicated”? Like that “out of memory” error and long GPS lock – those are already solved and eliminated by the latest firmware upgrade. (So this means that noone here takes the time to upgrade?)

    I like the iPhone – but having a wonderful UI (touchscreen and menu) just doesnt do it for me. I mean, you cant even customize the menu, make an mp3 into a ringtone, change icons, or take a video. The iPhone is great – when you’re playing around with it, but aside from email and browsing, what else can you do with it? It has no 3G or HSDPA, it has no MMS, no way to share stuff with another phone or connect to a TV or multimedia speakers – it’s just too limited, it lacks substance.

    I’ve always been fond of simple things, and this simplicity of the iPhone’s menu, endears it to most users – as they say, even a 10 year old can operate it. I agree wholeheartedly on that. But will I pay 599 dollars to use such a menu? 599 for an iPod with a screen? It doesn’t even have A2DP (stereo bluetooth) – so how great would it be on wireless music?

    Granted that the n95 or any other smartphone will never be as easy to use as the iPhone…. those other phones gives you substance (features) that’s really useful in real life. Other smartphones are NOT just a good menu, a large touchscreen, and storage of songs – they are so much more.

  155. I am one of the users that have refused to switch from a cell phone only. Wifi on my computer. I hated the limited features of the phones. I miss much by not doing this, but I work for a company that is primitive when it comes to communications….or until the management has one first (even though they normally have no idea how to use them). I am eager to try the iphone and will, even though the equipment price will be high, the service will not drive my bill up unreasonably. Comparisons of the alternatives seem to make me think this is a time for me to move forward. I WILL be back up with technology shortly. Good reviews, feedback and info.

  156. I am one of the users that have refused to switch from a cell phone only. Wifi on my computer. I hated the limited features of the phones. I miss much by not doing this, but I work for a company that is primitive when it comes to communications….or until the management has one first (even though they normally have no idea how to use them). I am eager to try the iphone and will, even though the equipment price will be high, the service will not drive my bill up unreasonably. Comparisons of the alternatives seem to make me think this is a time for me to move forward. I WILL be back up with technology shortly. Good reviews, feedback and info.

  157. Robert Scoble said “the Nokia still takes more clicks than the iPhone. One click for the icon. Another click when it asks “Allow application Google Maps to use network and send or receive data?” Another for “Select access point.” That’s three more than the iPhone does.”

    Sure. Now how long do you have to wait to download over that slooooooow data connection on your iPhone while the N95 shows me the result it got via 3G? I could barely believe it when I saw the spec for the iPhone. Shame on you, Apple.

  158. Robert Scoble said “the Nokia still takes more clicks than the iPhone. One click for the icon. Another click when it asks “Allow application Google Maps to use network and send or receive data?” Another for “Select access point.” That’s three more than the iPhone does.”

    Sure. Now how long do you have to wait to download over that slooooooow data connection on your iPhone while the N95 shows me the result it got via 3G? I could barely believe it when I saw the spec for the iPhone. Shame on you, Apple.

  159. Actually EDGE use of Google Maps on the iPhone is great, and pretty much instant – no waiting required.

    3G vs. EDGE is meaningless in terms of map data, because the amount of data sent is actually pretty small so the faster speed of 3G doesn’t really help.

    For web browsing 3G is better, but mostly I’m browsing where there’s WiFi of some sort which is faster than 3G anyway.

  160. Actually EDGE use of Google Maps on the iPhone is great, and pretty much instant – no waiting required.

    3G vs. EDGE is meaningless in terms of map data, because the amount of data sent is actually pretty small so the faster speed of 3G doesn’t really help.

    For web browsing 3G is better, but mostly I’m browsing where there’s WiFi of some sort which is faster than 3G anyway.

  161. So the N95-3 is out. 3.5G for at&t networks and increased ram and battery performance.

    Google just put out a full S60 version of Google Maps that uses the integrated GPS. Set a shortcut to it on the main screen and its one click start and one click for your location.

    Slingbox recently made their SlingMedia software available free for N95 owners. full control over your DVR and you can watch your TV anywhere.

    Then there’s the 5MP camera with VGA video recording.

    I just cant see any reason to pick an iPhone over all that.

  162. So the N95-3 is out. 3.5G for at&t networks and increased ram and battery performance.

    Google just put out a full S60 version of Google Maps that uses the integrated GPS. Set a shortcut to it on the main screen and its one click start and one click for your location.

    Slingbox recently made their SlingMedia software available free for N95 owners. full control over your DVR and you can watch your TV anywhere.

    Then there’s the 5MP camera with VGA video recording.

    I just cant see any reason to pick an iPhone over all that.

  163. N95 beats Iphone like hell, apple is new in the game so it can’t really beat the legend NOKIA, iphone might not be even user friendly but we do know that NOKIA is. Check out and get N95 vs iPhone comparison based in user experience opinions. http://www.swotti.com/mobilephones/

  164. N95 beats Iphone like hell, apple is new in the game so it can’t really beat the legend NOKIA, iphone might not be even user friendly but we do know that NOKIA is. Check out and get N95 vs iPhone comparison based in user experience opinions. http://www.swotti.com/mobilephones/

  165. I think the author of this needs to learn how to use the Nokia N95 properly… And to look into the N95 more deeply… As some other blogs like this have pointed out :D

  166. I think the author of this needs to learn how to use the Nokia N95 properly… And to look into the N95 more deeply… As some other blogs like this have pointed out :D

  167. I'm no fanboy of Apple or nokia. N95 is quite a different phone from the touchscreen iPhone. iPhone should be pitted against those from HTC or Omnia. And to some of the responses, I'm pretty sure for those 'non-iPhones', their “maps, stocks and browser” work too. And there's no need to hack those phones. To some people, the phone is their essential PDA, PIM, workhorse, whatever, and yes they need their alienware. http://www.satphire.com/

  168. I'm no fanboy of Apple or nokia. N95 is quite a different phone from the touchscreen iPhone. iPhone should be pitted against those from HTC or Omnia. And to some of the responses, I'm pretty sure for those 'non-iPhones', their “maps, stocks and browser” work too. And there's no need to hack those phones. To some people, the phone is their essential PDA, PIM, workhorse, whatever, and yes they need their alienware. http://www.satphire.com/