Nokia tries to get leadership position back from iPhone

Nokia has a bunch of new devices that I want to try. I have both an iPhone and a Nokia N95. I am keeping track of how often I pick up either device. The iPhone is winning. Bigtime.

Did the new Nokia devices fix the problem the iPhone pointed out: that its software is unthrilling?

Based on first reports and videos I’ve seen today: no.

That said, Nokia’s hardware is much more advanced than the iPhone. Better cameras, GPSs, replaceable batteries, more open so you can choose your carriers, etc.

What do you think?

Comments

  1. The N95 looks like a great device, I didn’t have too much time to play with it. I was hoping for a lower price tag than the iPhone. With the N95 costing more, it puts off a lot of potential customers. At least for the unlocked version.

  2. The N95 looks like a great device, I didn’t have too much time to play with it. I was hoping for a lower price tag than the iPhone. With the N95 costing more, it puts off a lot of potential customers. At least for the unlocked version.

  3. The N95 looks like a great device, I didn’t have too much time to play with it. I was hoping for a lower price tag than the iPhone. With the N95 costing more, it puts off a lot of potential customers. At least for the unlocked version.

  4. I think it’s mostly comparing apples and pears. Both have have some strong points and some less favorable ones.

    If I would have to sum it up into one equation, it would be closed (iPhone) versus open (N95).

    In the end, it all boils down to you’re personal needs, my wife needs a phone, and just that, no frizzle and sizzle, just a phone. She would look at both these phones with contempt, just because in her mind they are not phones, because of to much other stuff that they can do.

    I love my N95 because it enables me to play around with it, and I can program for it. But in the end, it’s about the personal experience and what one is used. One handed calling is for me pretty important, and i need my buttons for that. I love the manner in which the iPhone manages scrolling etc. through pictures, but in the end, i don’t need my phone for that……. I need it for making calls and some texting.

  5. I think it’s mostly comparing apples and pears. Both have have some strong points and some less favorable ones.

    If I would have to sum it up into one equation, it would be closed (iPhone) versus open (N95).

    In the end, it all boils down to you’re personal needs, my wife needs a phone, and just that, no frizzle and sizzle, just a phone. She would look at both these phones with contempt, just because in her mind they are not phones, because of to much other stuff that they can do.

    I love my N95 because it enables me to play around with it, and I can program for it. But in the end, it’s about the personal experience and what one is used. One handed calling is for me pretty important, and i need my buttons for that. I love the manner in which the iPhone manages scrolling etc. through pictures, but in the end, i don’t need my phone for that……. I need it for making calls and some texting.

  6. I think it’s mostly comparing apples and pears. Both have have some strong points and some less favorable ones.

    If I would have to sum it up into one equation, it would be closed (iPhone) versus open (N95).

    In the end, it all boils down to you’re personal needs, my wife needs a phone, and just that, no frizzle and sizzle, just a phone. She would look at both these phones with contempt, just because in her mind they are not phones, because of to much other stuff that they can do.

    I love my N95 because it enables me to play around with it, and I can program for it. But in the end, it’s about the personal experience and what one is used. One handed calling is for me pretty important, and i need my buttons for that. I love the manner in which the iPhone manages scrolling etc. through pictures, but in the end, i don’t need my phone for that……. I need it for making calls and some texting.

  7. Anything that accelerates Apple’s release pace is going to be seen as a good thing. There’s no doubt they have a gob of stuff in store for us and would be happy to trickle things out slowly (just look at the pathetic pace of innovation out of the pure iPod lineup… no competition = slow evolution).

    That said, Sept 5 might just prove me wrong with at least one new iPod expected.

    Still, N95 and Fred Wilson’s BlackBerry seem to be the only devices threatening iPhone. Pricepoint seems to be the other significant barrier to adoption. That and a meaty OS upgrade of the iPhone…

  8. Anything that accelerates Apple’s release pace is going to be seen as a good thing. There’s no doubt they have a gob of stuff in store for us and would be happy to trickle things out slowly (just look at the pathetic pace of innovation out of the pure iPod lineup… no competition = slow evolution).

    That said, Sept 5 might just prove me wrong with at least one new iPod expected.

    Still, N95 and Fred Wilson’s BlackBerry seem to be the only devices threatening iPhone. Pricepoint seems to be the other significant barrier to adoption. That and a meaty OS upgrade of the iPhone…

  9. Anything that accelerates Apple’s release pace is going to be seen as a good thing. There’s no doubt they have a gob of stuff in store for us and would be happy to trickle things out slowly (just look at the pathetic pace of innovation out of the pure iPod lineup… no competition = slow evolution).

    That said, Sept 5 might just prove me wrong with at least one new iPod expected.

    Still, N95 and Fred Wilson’s BlackBerry seem to be the only devices threatening iPhone. Pricepoint seems to be the other significant barrier to adoption. That and a meaty OS upgrade of the iPhone…

  10. The iPhone has captured our imaginations. Nokia hasn’t done that.

    It’s also not about an absolute measurement of product quality – relatively speaking, the iPhone is good enough, although clearly not the best and clearly littered with usability issues and lacking features.

  11. The iPhone has captured our imaginations. Nokia hasn’t done that.

    It’s also not about an absolute measurement of product quality – relatively speaking, the iPhone is good enough, although clearly not the best and clearly littered with usability issues and lacking features.

  12. The iPhone has captured our imaginations. Nokia hasn’t done that.

    It’s also not about an absolute measurement of product quality – relatively speaking, the iPhone is good enough, although clearly not the best and clearly littered with usability issues and lacking features.

  13. Hi Robert,

    I believe it was David Pogue who actually liked the Nokia. I do not know if he change his mind.

    For me iPhone is the king of the phones today.

    What we consider instead of Nokia is Gphone. If a were the product manager I would be thinking on:

    1. $150 USD (at most) phone with Maps, Gmail, Youtube and Docs on top.

    2. Phones can be the best but we have to do something with the carriers because their service just doesn’t work. One solution could be headed toward a mix of “Skype” (VOIP) technology and GSM where does not exist WiFi, exactly like “roaming.” Imagine the savings in every call!

    3. Also Google could give us an option to have ads or not; with ads, the cost of the plan could be less expensive.

    Mario Ruiz
    @ http://www.oursheet.com

  14. Hi Robert,

    I believe it was David Pogue who actually liked the Nokia. I do not know if he change his mind.

    For me iPhone is the king of the phones today.

    What we consider instead of Nokia is Gphone. If a were the product manager I would be thinking on:

    1. $150 USD (at most) phone with Maps, Gmail, Youtube and Docs on top.

    2. Phones can be the best but we have to do something with the carriers because their service just doesn’t work. One solution could be headed toward a mix of “Skype” (VOIP) technology and GSM where does not exist WiFi, exactly like “roaming.” Imagine the savings in every call!

    3. Also Google could give us an option to have ads or not; with ads, the cost of the plan could be less expensive.

    Mario Ruiz
    @ http://www.oursheet.com

  15. Hi Robert,

    I believe it was David Pogue who actually liked the Nokia. I do not know if he change his mind.

    For me iPhone is the king of the phones today.

    What we consider instead of Nokia is Gphone. If a were the product manager I would be thinking on:

    1. $150 USD (at most) phone with Maps, Gmail, Youtube and Docs on top.

    2. Phones can be the best but we have to do something with the carriers because their service just doesn’t work. One solution could be headed toward a mix of “Skype” (VOIP) technology and GSM where does not exist WiFi, exactly like “roaming.” Imagine the savings in every call!

    3. Also Google could give us an option to have ads or not; with ads, the cost of the plan could be less expensive.

    Mario Ruiz
    @ http://www.oursheet.com

  16. The iPhone couldn’t in anyones wildest dreams take away Nokias worldwide lead in mobildevice sales.

    Besides the Symbian OS is open.

  17. The iPhone couldn’t in anyones wildest dreams take away Nokias worldwide lead in mobildevice sales.

    Besides the Symbian OS is open.

  18. The iPhone couldn’t in anyones wildest dreams take away Nokias worldwide lead in mobildevice sales.

    Besides the Symbian OS is open.

  19. Nokia has had touchscreen for a long time starting with 7710 and so on. It’s not copying anybody. It’s just now capitalizing on the excitement iPhone has created.

    And when you talk about copying, let’s not forget that Apple didn’t create iPhone on it’s own. It bought the technology.

    Back to the subject: Nokia is always protecting it’s bottom line. Niche players can be creative, but Nokia acts only when mass market is doable.That means that all of the logistics and supply chain is optimized. You don’t do that on a whim.

    Nokia’s bread and butter are not high end phones, it’s the variety of models in the low and mid levels. And there Nokia has like + 100 models to support at this point and as many operators to make happy.

    It’s a bit different to make one product to one customer.

    And when that customer gives you the freedom nobody has given nobody before, then there is freedom for total innovation.

    iPhone is great, I totally agree. But the game has only began.

    Leadership? That is always a matter of perspective…

  20. Nokia has had touchscreen for a long time starting with 7710 and so on. It’s not copying anybody. It’s just now capitalizing on the excitement iPhone has created.

    And when you talk about copying, let’s not forget that Apple didn’t create iPhone on it’s own. It bought the technology.

    Back to the subject: Nokia is always protecting it’s bottom line. Niche players can be creative, but Nokia acts only when mass market is doable.That means that all of the logistics and supply chain is optimized. You don’t do that on a whim.

    Nokia’s bread and butter are not high end phones, it’s the variety of models in the low and mid levels. And there Nokia has like + 100 models to support at this point and as many operators to make happy.

    It’s a bit different to make one product to one customer.

    And when that customer gives you the freedom nobody has given nobody before, then there is freedom for total innovation.

    iPhone is great, I totally agree. But the game has only began.

    Leadership? That is always a matter of perspective…

  21. Nokia has had touchscreen for a long time starting with 7710 and so on. It’s not copying anybody. It’s just now capitalizing on the excitement iPhone has created.

    And when you talk about copying, let’s not forget that Apple didn’t create iPhone on it’s own. It bought the technology.

    Back to the subject: Nokia is always protecting it’s bottom line. Niche players can be creative, but Nokia acts only when mass market is doable.That means that all of the logistics and supply chain is optimized. You don’t do that on a whim.

    Nokia’s bread and butter are not high end phones, it’s the variety of models in the low and mid levels. And there Nokia has like + 100 models to support at this point and as many operators to make happy.

    It’s a bit different to make one product to one customer.

    And when that customer gives you the freedom nobody has given nobody before, then there is freedom for total innovation.

    iPhone is great, I totally agree. But the game has only began.

    Leadership? That is always a matter of perspective…

  22. What leadership position are we talking about in your myopic American world? Because the last I checked, Nokia was #1 worldwide by a HUGE margin.

  23. What leadership position are we talking about in your myopic American world? Because the last I checked, Nokia was #1 worldwide by a HUGE margin.

  24. What leadership position are we talking about in your myopic American world? Because the last I checked, Nokia was #1 worldwide by a HUGE margin.

  25. @Robert, marketshare wise, Nokia still has a large lead over the iphone. Technology wise, with respect to the UI they’ve got a lead. Technologically, i deem the iPhone behind Nokia. Platformwise, Nokia has an open platform, iPhone is closed. So my kudo’s go towards Nokia (i like open platforms).

    It will be interesting to see how the iPhone will fare in Europe, (in my opinion, forcing customers to use a specific operator stinks. If the price with the contract is in the region of the US, it’s way to expensive (you would get a N95 for around Euro 100,-, and most fancy phone’s are even cheaper), I assume they’ve got 3G taken care off before they get into Europe (some countries are already dismantling EDGE networks))

    What is interesting is that Nokia is quickly rolling out a lot of interesting services (music and games f.i.). And quickly changing the specs of the N95 based upon customer feedback.

    The iPhone is gui wise very interesting (including its web capabilities). But otherwise, it’s specs are meagre compared to the N95.

  26. @Robert, marketshare wise, Nokia still has a large lead over the iphone. Technology wise, with respect to the UI they’ve got a lead. Technologically, i deem the iPhone behind Nokia. Platformwise, Nokia has an open platform, iPhone is closed. So my kudo’s go towards Nokia (i like open platforms).

    It will be interesting to see how the iPhone will fare in Europe, (in my opinion, forcing customers to use a specific operator stinks. If the price with the contract is in the region of the US, it’s way to expensive (you would get a N95 for around Euro 100,-, and most fancy phone’s are even cheaper), I assume they’ve got 3G taken care off before they get into Europe (some countries are already dismantling EDGE networks))

    What is interesting is that Nokia is quickly rolling out a lot of interesting services (music and games f.i.). And quickly changing the specs of the N95 based upon customer feedback.

    The iPhone is gui wise very interesting (including its web capabilities). But otherwise, it’s specs are meagre compared to the N95.

  27. @Robert, marketshare wise, Nokia still has a large lead over the iphone. Technology wise, with respect to the UI they’ve got a lead. Technologically, i deem the iPhone behind Nokia. Platformwise, Nokia has an open platform, iPhone is closed. So my kudo’s go towards Nokia (i like open platforms).

    It will be interesting to see how the iPhone will fare in Europe, (in my opinion, forcing customers to use a specific operator stinks. If the price with the contract is in the region of the US, it’s way to expensive (you would get a N95 for around Euro 100,-, and most fancy phone’s are even cheaper), I assume they’ve got 3G taken care off before they get into Europe (some countries are already dismantling EDGE networks))

    What is interesting is that Nokia is quickly rolling out a lot of interesting services (music and games f.i.). And quickly changing the specs of the N95 based upon customer feedback.

    The iPhone is gui wise very interesting (including its web capabilities). But otherwise, it’s specs are meagre compared to the N95.

  28. The iPhone is the first phone to put a dent in my Nokia love affair. All other phone manufacturers failed. (Admittedly, the Sidekick II on release was a momentary love-fling with a messaging centric device where access to corporate email was not a priority.)

    My Nokia E70 remains everything the iPhone falls short of, however, the iPhone is everything I would wish Nokia to aspire to. An unlocked, open iPhone with 3rd party S60v3 type apps, a decent speakerphone + camera + videocamera, and a removable battery would go a long way. A 2nd battery would at least get you thru the day and maybe in to the evening .

  29. The iPhone is the first phone to put a dent in my Nokia love affair. All other phone manufacturers failed. (Admittedly, the Sidekick II on release was a momentary love-fling with a messaging centric device where access to corporate email was not a priority.)

    My Nokia E70 remains everything the iPhone falls short of, however, the iPhone is everything I would wish Nokia to aspire to. An unlocked, open iPhone with 3rd party S60v3 type apps, a decent speakerphone + camera + videocamera, and a removable battery would go a long way. A 2nd battery would at least get you thru the day and maybe in to the evening .

  30. The iPhone is the first phone to put a dent in my Nokia love affair. All other phone manufacturers failed. (Admittedly, the Sidekick II on release was a momentary love-fling with a messaging centric device where access to corporate email was not a priority.)

    My Nokia E70 remains everything the iPhone falls short of, however, the iPhone is everything I would wish Nokia to aspire to. An unlocked, open iPhone with 3rd party S60v3 type apps, a decent speakerphone + camera + videocamera, and a removable battery would go a long way. A 2nd battery would at least get you thru the day and maybe in to the evening .

  31. I got an unlocked Nokia e61 so I wouldn’t be locked in with a company. I like having a keyboard I can use with my big thumbs.

    Nice screen, wifi access. A bit clunky, but I’m happy.

  32. I got an unlocked Nokia e61 so I wouldn’t be locked in with a company. I like having a keyboard I can use with my big thumbs.

    Nice screen, wifi access. A bit clunky, but I’m happy.

  33. I got an unlocked Nokia e61 so I wouldn’t be locked in with a company. I like having a keyboard I can use with my big thumbs.

    Nice screen, wifi access. A bit clunky, but I’m happy.

  34. While Nokia does have a head start in the mobile device market, Apple has several technical advantages that Nokia simply doesn’t have.

    For example, Apple has several pro-level video, audio and photo applications which are developed by Apple engineers. Since the iPhone runs OS X, the same technology and developers can repurposed to create advanced mobile applications. Nokia simply doesn’t have these resources at their disposal.

    And Apple is already leveraging much of it’s desktop OS functionality, such as Core Animation and Objective-C / Cocoa in the iPhone’s UI. As far as I know, no other mobile device is even close to implementing hardware accelerated, object oriented animation framework on a mobile device – including Microsoft.

    Now that the iPhone platform has shipped, I think the biggest challenge for Apple isn’t technology, it’s figuring out how to best translate existing mobile device features using a multi-touch UI. This is where Apple’s strength really lies.

    Version 1.0 of the IPhone is simply laying the groundwork for this process.

  35. While Nokia does have a head start in the mobile device market, Apple has several technical advantages that Nokia simply doesn’t have.

    For example, Apple has several pro-level video, audio and photo applications which are developed by Apple engineers. Since the iPhone runs OS X, the same technology and developers can repurposed to create advanced mobile applications. Nokia simply doesn’t have these resources at their disposal.

    And Apple is already leveraging much of it’s desktop OS functionality, such as Core Animation and Objective-C / Cocoa in the iPhone’s UI. As far as I know, no other mobile device is even close to implementing hardware accelerated, object oriented animation framework on a mobile device – including Microsoft.

    Now that the iPhone platform has shipped, I think the biggest challenge for Apple isn’t technology, it’s figuring out how to best translate existing mobile device features using a multi-touch UI. This is where Apple’s strength really lies.

    Version 1.0 of the IPhone is simply laying the groundwork for this process.

  36. While Nokia does have a head start in the mobile device market, Apple has several technical advantages that Nokia simply doesn’t have.

    For example, Apple has several pro-level video, audio and photo applications which are developed by Apple engineers. Since the iPhone runs OS X, the same technology and developers can repurposed to create advanced mobile applications. Nokia simply doesn’t have these resources at their disposal.

    And Apple is already leveraging much of it’s desktop OS functionality, such as Core Animation and Objective-C / Cocoa in the iPhone’s UI. As far as I know, no other mobile device is even close to implementing hardware accelerated, object oriented animation framework on a mobile device – including Microsoft.

    Now that the iPhone platform has shipped, I think the biggest challenge for Apple isn’t technology, it’s figuring out how to best translate existing mobile device features using a multi-touch UI. This is where Apple’s strength really lies.

    Version 1.0 of the IPhone is simply laying the groundwork for this process.

  37. Nokia sells to almost everybody who has the money and coverage. Apple refuses to sell to almost everybody.

  38. Don’t think Apple will ever be in any form of leadership position in a mobile market.

    Furthermore, how neat, cool, swell the iPhone might look as a device, the fact that it’s based on a closed system locked in to a single provider per country will make it a though sell and most likely non-sustainable in the long run.

    It reminds me a bit about the big campaigns we saw for iMode in Europe a couple of years ago. I’m afraid Apple will end up in the same corner of the market.

    After all: youngsters tend not to want contract-services but prefer the pre-paid cards because it enables them to switch provider whenever they can find a better deal. Their scarce money resources are spent on the phone rather than the services.

    I do believe Apple will find it’s place in the market, especially with the design loving adult crowd. But then again, given the new launches and designs of Nokia and the likes, why should I feel forced to switch my contract from one provider to another. I’m happy with mine and I see no reason to change. At least not for the sake of a piece of hardware how ever beautiful it may be.

  39. Don’t think Apple will ever be in any form of leadership position in a mobile market.

    Furthermore, how neat, cool, swell the iPhone might look as a device, the fact that it’s based on a closed system locked in to a single provider per country will make it a though sell and most likely non-sustainable in the long run.

    It reminds me a bit about the big campaigns we saw for iMode in Europe a couple of years ago. I’m afraid Apple will end up in the same corner of the market.

    After all: youngsters tend not to want contract-services but prefer the pre-paid cards because it enables them to switch provider whenever they can find a better deal. Their scarce money resources are spent on the phone rather than the services.

    I do believe Apple will find it’s place in the market, especially with the design loving adult crowd. But then again, given the new launches and designs of Nokia and the likes, why should I feel forced to switch my contract from one provider to another. I’m happy with mine and I see no reason to change. At least not for the sake of a piece of hardware how ever beautiful it may be.

  40. Don’t think Apple will ever be in any form of leadership position in a mobile market.

    Furthermore, how neat, cool, swell the iPhone might look as a device, the fact that it’s based on a closed system locked in to a single provider per country will make it a though sell and most likely non-sustainable in the long run.

    It reminds me a bit about the big campaigns we saw for iMode in Europe a couple of years ago. I’m afraid Apple will end up in the same corner of the market.

    After all: youngsters tend not to want contract-services but prefer the pre-paid cards because it enables them to switch provider whenever they can find a better deal. Their scarce money resources are spent on the phone rather than the services.

    I do believe Apple will find it’s place in the market, especially with the design loving adult crowd. But then again, given the new launches and designs of Nokia and the likes, why should I feel forced to switch my contract from one provider to another. I’m happy with mine and I see no reason to change. At least not for the sake of a piece of hardware how ever beautiful it may be.

  41. Nokia’s phone business is bigger than Apple’s all the businesses combined. The cell phone users is among the most diversified set of users for a technical product. It is amazing how well Nokia is serving users from a rural are in a poor country to a trendy city in a rich country. Nokia’s top two largest markets consists of poor countries and the next two rich countries.

    On the other hand Apple serves only one market with only one kind of users. If you are in that category of users you are bound to prefer iPhone because it is custom designed for you. But outside of that category of users, there are plenty of options in Nokia’s phones including N95 to serve almost anybody’s purpose.

  42. Nokia’s phone business is bigger than Apple’s all the businesses combined. The cell phone users is among the most diversified set of users for a technical product. It is amazing how well Nokia is serving users from a rural are in a poor country to a trendy city in a rich country. Nokia’s top two largest markets consists of poor countries and the next two rich countries.

    On the other hand Apple serves only one market with only one kind of users. If you are in that category of users you are bound to prefer iPhone because it is custom designed for you. But outside of that category of users, there are plenty of options in Nokia’s phones including N95 to serve almost anybody’s purpose.

  43. Nokia’s phone business is bigger than Apple’s all the businesses combined. The cell phone users is among the most diversified set of users for a technical product. It is amazing how well Nokia is serving users from a rural are in a poor country to a trendy city in a rich country. Nokia’s top two largest markets consists of poor countries and the next two rich countries.

    On the other hand Apple serves only one market with only one kind of users. If you are in that category of users you are bound to prefer iPhone because it is custom designed for you. But outside of that category of users, there are plenty of options in Nokia’s phones including N95 to serve almost anybody’s purpose.

  44. As @scott said, Apple has laid the groundwork. I would add that it is the first phone that can upgrade itself with a minimum of user intervention. Even S60v3 upgrades are painful at best.

    As to product strategy, Apple has done fine with a closed system (iPod) with price points from low to high. What indication is there that that cannot be replicated?

    Finally, the signals from Apple are that the platform will be opened up, I suspect it will have some BREW like QA and process control.

  45. As @scott said, Apple has laid the groundwork. I would add that it is the first phone that can upgrade itself with a minimum of user intervention. Even S60v3 upgrades are painful at best.

    As to product strategy, Apple has done fine with a closed system (iPod) with price points from low to high. What indication is there that that cannot be replicated?

    Finally, the signals from Apple are that the platform will be opened up, I suspect it will have some BREW like QA and process control.

  46. As @scott said, Apple has laid the groundwork. I would add that it is the first phone that can upgrade itself with a minimum of user intervention. Even S60v3 upgrades are painful at best.

    As to product strategy, Apple has done fine with a closed system (iPod) with price points from low to high. What indication is there that that cannot be replicated?

    Finally, the signals from Apple are that the platform will be opened up, I suspect it will have some BREW like QA and process control.

  47. iPhone, Imitation is the Sincerest Form of Flattery

    If you’re new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting!

    They said, the iPhone would change the mobile game and raise the bar for rest of the industry. I completely agree with that assessment and have commented on it …

  48. You’re all mad.

    Go buy a Nokia series 40 2.5G phone such as the 6300 (or a little Sony, or a Samsung). Enjoy well over a week of battery life, calls that just work, SMS which just works and PCMac syncronisation which just works.

    Enjoy the fact that you NEVER have to reboot your phone and that you can start writing a fully addressed SMS in less than five button clicks (quicker for an experienced SMSer than the iPhone will ever be and definitely quicker than the sclerotic Nseries phones).

    Enjoy the fact that your trouser pocket is not distended and that your not wearing some godawful geek pouch on your hip (or spend your life wiping finger prints off your pristine touch screen).

    Finally enjoy the fact that you haven’t spend a kings ransom on a godawful piece of frippery which totally fails to perform is supposedly primary purpose – to be a phone.

    Seriously, just buy a goddamn phone. The 6300 is £100 with NO CONTRACT and no SIMNetwork lock in the UK and knocks the crap out of any phone I’ve used in a very long time.

    To be clear – I do love geeky little devices. I also have a HTC Hermes rurnning WM6 which I use for portable internet (@1.8Mbps on Vodafone UK) and as a modem for my laptop (constantly and reliably connected when on client site) and video. An iPod nano operates as the musicpodcast device. But fundamentally, I need a functioning phone and neither the Nseries or I’m sure the iPhone will fill that requirement.

  49. You’re all mad.

    Go buy a Nokia series 40 2.5G phone such as the 6300 (or a little Sony, or a Samsung). Enjoy well over a week of battery life, calls that just work, SMS which just works and PCMac syncronisation which just works.

    Enjoy the fact that you NEVER have to reboot your phone and that you can start writing a fully addressed SMS in less than five button clicks (quicker for an experienced SMSer than the iPhone will ever be and definitely quicker than the sclerotic Nseries phones).

    Enjoy the fact that your trouser pocket is not distended and that your not wearing some godawful geek pouch on your hip (or spend your life wiping finger prints off your pristine touch screen).

    Finally enjoy the fact that you haven’t spend a kings ransom on a godawful piece of frippery which totally fails to perform is supposedly primary purpose – to be a phone.

    Seriously, just buy a goddamn phone. The 6300 is £100 with NO CONTRACT and no SIMNetwork lock in the UK and knocks the crap out of any phone I’ve used in a very long time.

    To be clear – I do love geeky little devices. I also have a HTC Hermes rurnning WM6 which I use for portable internet (@1.8Mbps on Vodafone UK) and as a modem for my laptop (constantly and reliably connected when on client site) and video. An iPod nano operates as the musicpodcast device. But fundamentally, I need a functioning phone and neither the Nseries or I’m sure the iPhone will fill that requirement.

  50. You’re all mad.

    Go buy a Nokia series 40 2.5G phone such as the 6300 (or a little Sony, or a Samsung). Enjoy well over a week of battery life, calls that just work, SMS which just works and PCMac syncronisation which just works.

    Enjoy the fact that you NEVER have to reboot your phone and that you can start writing a fully addressed SMS in less than five button clicks (quicker for an experienced SMSer than the iPhone will ever be and definitely quicker than the sclerotic Nseries phones).

    Enjoy the fact that your trouser pocket is not distended and that your not wearing some godawful geek pouch on your hip (or spend your life wiping finger prints off your pristine touch screen).

    Finally enjoy the fact that you haven’t spend a kings ransom on a godawful piece of frippery which totally fails to perform is supposedly primary purpose – to be a phone.

    Seriously, just buy a goddamn phone. The 6300 is £100 with NO CONTRACT and no SIMNetwork lock in the UK and knocks the crap out of any phone I’ve used in a very long time.

    To be clear – I do love geeky little devices. I also have a HTC Hermes rurnning WM6 which I use for portable internet (@1.8Mbps on Vodafone UK) and as a modem for my laptop (constantly and reliably connected when on client site) and video. An iPod nano operates as the musicpodcast device. But fundamentally, I need a functioning phone and neither the Nseries or I’m sure the iPhone will fill that requirement.

  51. No question: N95 hands down: I like the 3G capability, built-in GPS (now much faster with the new firmware), SDHC support, very good camera, unlocked SIM and still about the same price as the iPhone.

    My only complaint is on the battery life, but at least with the Nokia I can carry a spare

  52. No question: N95 hands down: I like the 3G capability, built-in GPS (now much faster with the new firmware), SDHC support, very good camera, unlocked SIM and still about the same price as the iPhone.

    My only complaint is on the battery life, but at least with the Nokia I can carry a spare

  53. No question: N95 hands down: I like the 3G capability, built-in GPS (now much faster with the new firmware), SDHC support, very good camera, unlocked SIM and still about the same price as the iPhone.

    My only complaint is on the battery life, but at least with the Nokia I can carry a spare

  54. The Nokia Nazis are back.

    They say some ridiculous things. My favorite so far? Their claim that the N95 phone is a better digital music player than the iPod.

  55. The Nokia Nazis are back.

    They say some ridiculous things. My favorite so far? Their claim that the N95 phone is a better digital music player than the iPod.

  56. I’ve used the new Nokia music phones with Bose earbuds and with my Bluetooth streaming system. The sound coming from my Nokia setup is as good through earbuds as through my iPod Sennheiser buds. The iPod doesn’t stream to my Bluetooth SCART system out of the box and it doesn’t do a lot of other things that a Nokia phone/music combo can do. And if comments above are to be believed, the iPhone doesn’t have the on-board capabilities to deliver a long work day of calling, texting and browsing without a topping up its power. I need that kind of business connectivity to convince an accountant that an iPhone is a business expense.

    You’re not going to convince long-term Nokia users that the iPhone will fit their needs. But you can convince people who did not grow up texting that the iPhone is the best tech on the planet. Here in Europe, you need to depend on your phone for things like text connectivity and file sharing across the table. Those are very tactile activities and they are tough for my fat fingers to do using only a touch screen. All the new mid-range to top tier phones in Europe let you share your content over Bluetooth and High Speed wireless data connections. Those things aren’t on the feature set of the iPhone. But Apple is smart enough to follow Nokia’s lead on these things so I expect iPhone v2 will start to remedy its first generation shortfalls.

  57. I’ve used the new Nokia music phones with Bose earbuds and with my Bluetooth streaming system. The sound coming from my Nokia setup is as good through earbuds as through my iPod Sennheiser buds. The iPod doesn’t stream to my Bluetooth SCART system out of the box and it doesn’t do a lot of other things that a Nokia phone/music combo can do. And if comments above are to be believed, the iPhone doesn’t have the on-board capabilities to deliver a long work day of calling, texting and browsing without a topping up its power. I need that kind of business connectivity to convince an accountant that an iPhone is a business expense.

    You’re not going to convince long-term Nokia users that the iPhone will fit their needs. But you can convince people who did not grow up texting that the iPhone is the best tech on the planet. Here in Europe, you need to depend on your phone for things like text connectivity and file sharing across the table. Those are very tactile activities and they are tough for my fat fingers to do using only a touch screen. All the new mid-range to top tier phones in Europe let you share your content over Bluetooth and High Speed wireless data connections. Those things aren’t on the feature set of the iPhone. But Apple is smart enough to follow Nokia’s lead on these things so I expect iPhone v2 will start to remedy its first generation shortfalls.

  58. I’ve used the new Nokia music phones with Bose earbuds and with my Bluetooth streaming system. The sound coming from my Nokia setup is as good through earbuds as through my iPod Sennheiser buds. The iPod doesn’t stream to my Bluetooth SCART system out of the box and it doesn’t do a lot of other things that a Nokia phone/music combo can do. And if comments above are to be believed, the iPhone doesn’t have the on-board capabilities to deliver a long work day of calling, texting and browsing without a topping up its power. I need that kind of business connectivity to convince an accountant that an iPhone is a business expense.

    You’re not going to convince long-term Nokia users that the iPhone will fit their needs. But you can convince people who did not grow up texting that the iPhone is the best tech on the planet. Here in Europe, you need to depend on your phone for things like text connectivity and file sharing across the table. Those are very tactile activities and they are tough for my fat fingers to do using only a touch screen. All the new mid-range to top tier phones in Europe let you share your content over Bluetooth and High Speed wireless data connections. Those things aren’t on the feature set of the iPhone. But Apple is smart enough to follow Nokia’s lead on these things so I expect iPhone v2 will start to remedy its first generation shortfalls.

  59. I don’t know about a lot of people, but to me, I feel that the leadership position still belongs to Nokia. Sure, the iPhone is nice and all, but the last time I checked, Nokia phones’ specifications are better compared to that of the Apple iPhone. Besides, how much of the mobile phone using population went ga-ga and dropped their Nokia phones just to get an iPhone? Not as much as many people think, and not even close to toppling Nokia from the top of the mobile phone world.

    - Aaron
    http://www.blogtext.org/yoretiller

  60. I don’t know about a lot of people, but to me, I feel that the leadership position still belongs to Nokia. Sure, the iPhone is nice and all, but the last time I checked, Nokia phones’ specifications are better compared to that of the Apple iPhone. Besides, how much of the mobile phone using population went ga-ga and dropped their Nokia phones just to get an iPhone? Not as much as many people think, and not even close to toppling Nokia from the top of the mobile phone world.

    - Aaron
    http://www.blogtext.org/yoretiller