Email ain’t going away

Here’s one of my conversations lately (this conversation pretty much happened this way the other night):

FAMILY FRIEND: “Can you email me photos of your new baby as soon as possible?”

ME: “I’ll put them on my Flickr.”

FAMILY FRIEND: “What’s that?”

ME: “It’s where I share my photos.”

FAMILY FRIEND: “Why are you being a jerk, just email them to me!”

ME: “I will put them on my Flickr account. Flickr is a much better place for you to look at photos, plus I can get them there from my cell phone without doing any work so you’ll get them faster.”

FAMILY FRIEND: “How do I get to your Flickr account and why can’t you just email me your photos?”

ME: “Just visit my blog, I link to my Flickr feed there.”

FAMILY FRIEND: “I don’t know where your blog is.”

ME: “Go to Google and search for my name and you’ll find my blog.”

FAMILY FRIEND: “I don’t get why you can’t just email me them. Well, can you at least let me know when your new baby arrives via email?”

ME: “Yeah, I’ll do that on my Twitter account, which will also show up on my Pownce account, and on my Facebook account, among others, just watch those places with your RSS Reader.”

FAMILY FRIEND: “GGGggggaaaaaaaahhhhhhhh.”

MARYAM CHIMES IN: “Don’t worry, he’ll email you. I’ll make sure of it.”

ME: Realizes this is pretty stupid but has a plan. I’ll email everyone when my Twitter account, Zooomr account, Flickr account, Facebook account, Pownce account, Plaxo account, YouTube account, Kyte account, Jaiku account, and my blog are all updated with baby stuff.

Yes, the birth of our baby is about to bring the world more email. :-)

Anyone have an email system that’d watch all the above for mentions of “Milan” or “Baby” and send out an alert to a preset list of people?

And now you know the trouble that these Web 2.0 sites will have in getting everyday people to try them out.

UPDATE: Barbara gave me heck for not having a Tumblr account, so here’s my Tumblr account. Heheh.

176 thoughts on “Email ain’t going away

  1. HA! I’ve fallen back on the ‘just google me’ phrase before now *grin* and I am SOOOO not even close to being an ‘e’ lister never mind up there in the scoble stakes.

    c’mon, admit it – it’s a ballache emailing pictures to every tom dick and harry when you can just send them all to one place for everyone to access.

    I came across something new today on techcrunch that you can annoy your relatives with instead *grin*
    http://storyofmylife.com/

    Sounds like the solution for all time – and they can do it right back atcha then too ;0)

  2. HA! I’ve fallen back on the ‘just google me’ phrase before now *grin* and I am SOOOO not even close to being an ‘e’ lister never mind up there in the scoble stakes.

    c’mon, admit it – it’s a ballache emailing pictures to every tom dick and harry when you can just send them all to one place for everyone to access.

    I came across something new today on techcrunch that you can annoy your relatives with instead *grin*
    http://storyofmylife.com/

    Sounds like the solution for all time – and they can do it right back atcha then too ;0)

  3. I personally think this highlights people’s laziness.

    While i do not expect everyone to use every social networking tool, i think it’s a good think for Robert to nicely nudge people away from email.

    I find it interesting that according to some comments that email is now looked at as the “common man’s” tool. or the accessible tool. far from it! it’s a pit of problems!

    Robert’s post could be rephrased like this:

    “Spoon feed me your information”

    “Here’s a spoon, here’s the food, already cooked”

    “NO, spoon feed me! my mouth. right in here, thanks.”

    email is a “push” tool, not a “pull” tool. that friend wanted EVERYTHING pushed, which requires no pull, which is lazy. it’s also intellectually lazy – go learn some new things! ween yourself from email!

  4. I personally think this highlights people’s laziness.

    While i do not expect everyone to use every social networking tool, i think it’s a good think for Robert to nicely nudge people away from email.

    I find it interesting that according to some comments that email is now looked at as the “common man’s” tool. or the accessible tool. far from it! it’s a pit of problems!

    Robert’s post could be rephrased like this:

    “Spoon feed me your information”

    “Here’s a spoon, here’s the food, already cooked”

    “NO, spoon feed me! my mouth. right in here, thanks.”

    email is a “push” tool, not a “pull” tool. that friend wanted EVERYTHING pushed, which requires no pull, which is lazy. it’s also intellectually lazy – go learn some new things! ween yourself from email!

  5. To follow on jcricket’s point @78, what is apparent is that the Web 2.0 brainiacs write software only for themselves to use and not real people. Until they try to solve real world problems with their products and stop trying to write apps THEY simply think are cool, they will continue to have relatively low adoption and not make a dent beyond their own virtual back yard.

  6. To follow on jcricket’s point @78, what is apparent is that the Web 2.0 brainiacs write software only for themselves to use and not real people. Until they try to solve real world problems with their products and stop trying to write apps THEY simply think are cool, they will continue to have relatively low adoption and not make a dent beyond their own virtual back yard.

  7. I’m glad you can get so excited about something Robert, I only hope you reserve some of that same enthusiasm for interacting with real people, face to face, like your new daughter. Time spent in front of screens with your “5000 friends” should be considered research/work, or a diversion, not real friendship.

    I find fascination with shiny new technology kind of pointless. After 20 years or so I’m impressed by the advances that have lasted (you won’t see me arguing in favor of replacing my Powerbook G4 with a 8088) but I’ve also grown smart enough to realize sitting on the side lines and jumping in as a late adopter is a far more rational real world strategy than trying everything out. You waste less money, time and energy that way, and still reap all the benefits.

    Which is my point about your conversation with friends. Early adopters and bleeding-edgers like yourself will always be a tiny minority. So (this goes to the tnkgrl too) if you want a wide community to interact with, you will be the ones who have to adapt until the market sorts out which new thing is “interesting” or “useful” enough for the masses to adopt it.

    Unless you’re just trying to be kewl. And I’ve seen you in videos Robert – that ship has sailed :-)

  8. I’m glad you can get so excited about something Robert, I only hope you reserve some of that same enthusiasm for interacting with real people, face to face, like your new daughter. Time spent in front of screens with your “5000 friends” should be considered research/work, or a diversion, not real friendship.

    I find fascination with shiny new technology kind of pointless. After 20 years or so I’m impressed by the advances that have lasted (you won’t see me arguing in favor of replacing my Powerbook G4 with a 8088) but I’ve also grown smart enough to realize sitting on the side lines and jumping in as a late adopter is a far more rational real world strategy than trying everything out. You waste less money, time and energy that way, and still reap all the benefits.

    Which is my point about your conversation with friends. Early adopters and bleeding-edgers like yourself will always be a tiny minority. So (this goes to the tnkgrl too) if you want a wide community to interact with, you will be the ones who have to adapt until the market sorts out which new thing is “interesting” or “useful” enough for the masses to adopt it.

    Unless you’re just trying to be kewl. And I’ve seen you in videos Robert – that ship has sailed :-)

  9. I’m with Robert on this one… Adapt (adopt?) or die!

    Sure it’s a bit condescending to tell people “just Google me”, but ultimately, you can’t have a community and connection without people actually participating, be it on or off-line.

  10. I’m with Robert on this one… Adapt (adopt?) or die!

    Sure it’s a bit condescending to tell people “just Google me”, but ultimately, you can’t have a community and connection without people actually participating, be it on or off-line.

  11. jcricket: we’ve had discussions like this with every new technology. Every single one. Some people are late adopters, luddites even. My ex father in law enjoyed telling me he never used a computer and never will.

    By the way, I was like this LONG before I ever started getting paid by the industry.

  12. jcricket: we’ve had discussions like this with every new technology. Every single one. Some people are late adopters, luddites even. My ex father in law enjoyed telling me he never used a computer and never will.

    By the way, I was like this LONG before I ever started getting paid by the industry.

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