Daily Archives: September 16, 2007

TechCrunch 40 list…

Paul Boutin is a journalist I’ve been following for some time. He’s very credible. Got this list of the TechCrunch 40 finalists by looking at the banners hanging around the Palace Hotel. I’ve visited all their sites, but many aren’t up yet. Anyway, it’ll be interesting to see who will win the $50,000.

It’s interesting that the best news is flowing over on Twitter. It’s far faster than TechMeme, which doesn’t have anything yet about TechCrunch 40.

Two days of Milan — his first Twittergram story — BlogTalk Radio

Milan's first Twittergram

I just uploaded the best of my photos from the past couple of days.

You might have missed it, but when he was first born I recorded a Twittergram that announced his birth to the world. This photo tells the story and has a link to Milan’s first Twittergram. I used a cell phone to call the Twittergram service and when I hung up the phone the Twittergram and recording was sent instantly to my Twitter account. I’ve demoed this on stage several times and each time someone comes up to me afterward and says “that’s amazing.”

Twittergram is a service hosted by BlogTalk Radio and invented by Dave Winer. I have a video with BlogTalk’s CEO coming later tonight because they are shipping a bunch of new features tomorrow at TechCrunch 40. Come back shortly after 9 p.m. tonight.

I’ve had so many people tell me how touched they were by hearing Milan cry. Even family members who never would have gotten to hear his first cry have said how neat that is. I’ve listened to it a dozen times and I find it one of my favorite pieces of media that I’ve created. Something about the first cry that just gets your attention. It’s different than any cry that’s come since.

All you do is set up your account with your cell phone number. Then you call the TwitterGram number and it records up to 30 seconds of audio and puts the audio on Twitter — literally instantly. It’s great for sending audio to your friends on Twitter, or getting a short recording up on the Internet as an MP3 file.

Another service that does something similar is Jott.com. Except Jott doesn’t send the audio to Twitter. It sends the audio to India, where it’s transcribed to text, and then sent back to Twitter (or your blog, or your email, among other places). I wonder how they would have transcribed this? Waaaaaa. Waaaaaaa. Waaaaaaaaaaaaaaa. Waaaaaaa. :-)