Attack of the robotic helicopter

Crowd pleaser

Ever start a story like this?

Yesterday I was attacked by an autonomous robotic helicopter

Me neither until I was attacked by one of these criters on our photowalking at Stanford University. Turns out that if it gets a bad bit of directional data sent to it they’ll go out of control and one did just that: flipped over and came straight at me and hit me in the leg (no one was injured and the robot was rebooted and flew just fine from then on). One of the developers said that it might just be an evil robot. Heh. Can’t wait to show you the video (Rocky says he got the attack on video). It was an incredible day with a mixture of art, science, and technology and Ian Hsu, of Stanford, gave us a great tour that’ll be quite hard to match.

UPDATE: We’ve just uploaded the video of the mishap.

The photographers, brought to Stanford by the National Geographic, who presented in the evening as part of the All Roads Project were incredible — they are visiting several cities in the US and I highly recommend getting to their talks and meeting them. Made me realize how much of the world we don’t see because many of the world’s photographers don’t know how to use blogs and/or Flickr and/or don’t have access to the Internet. One photographer, from Africa, if I remember right, told the audience that there are villages where people are getting killed during protests over electricity. He made the point that photographers there aren’t very likely to be on the Internet.

Some interesting brainstorming is underway of how to bring more images from these places to the Internet, which is where the audiences that might be able to help with money and/or PR attention (which is what many of these photographers are hoping for).

I’ll have my photos up in a few hours, still processing them. Oh, and damn Apple’s iPhoto. It crashed several times and ate my photos to boot. So, I’m switching my workflow over to Adobe stuff which I should have done in the first place anyway.

Over the next week or so we’ll get the videos up we shot, including of the robotics team.

The official tag is “photowalkingstanford.” But there’s photos on Flickr for photowalkingstanford and on stanfordphotowalk. I’m sure Thomas Hawk will get some up soon too and I’ll update this post when that happens.

UPDATE: over on Zooomr there are a lot more images. Here’s the ones on Zooomr tagged with photowalkingstanford and photowalking100107.

By the way, thanks to the approx. 40 people who showed up. Looking forward to seeing your photos. Please link to any of your blogs/photos here in the comment section so we can see them all.

Our next photowalking will be in the Marin Headlands with Trevor Carpenter on October 9th.

Crowd pleaser

UPDATE: Here’s my photos from the day:

Scary Thomas shoots New Guinea sculpture The Gates of Hell Team member reorients robot Who has more cameras? Stairway in Stanford's Memorial Church Photowalking inside the Church Pictures and Pews Beautiful Glass Stanford's Synchronized Swim Team Rodin this, Rodin that! Thomas Hawk gets a tour Photo researcher, Marc Levoy Part of a camera array A whole lot of cameras

Comments

  1. This will be really interesting to watch… can’t wait!

    About iPhoto — come on! How can you say that… it’s Apple iPhoto. It can never, ever, ever crash. It’s all your fault.

  2. This will be really interesting to watch… can’t wait!

    About iPhoto — come on! How can you say that… it’s Apple iPhoto. It can never, ever, ever crash. It’s all your fault.

  3. Photowalking op Stanford

    Mijn eerste keer Photowalking. Wat houdt dit in, een groep mensen die bij elkaar komt op een locatie, en foto’s maakt van wat ze ook zien. Het event gaat vaak gepaard met een uitleg van de omgeving, of een ander

  4. I’m happy that you turned into photography that seriously. That adds an extra layer of interest to your blog.
    Maybe you could disclose your workflow in a little more detail. Which Adobe are you getting?

  5. I’m happy that you turned into photography that seriously. That adds an extra layer of interest to your blog.
    Maybe you could disclose your workflow in a little more detail. Which Adobe are you getting?

  6. Bad luck on the iPhoto crash. I have to admit being attacked by a robotic helicopter is a rather peculiar start to any story.

  7. Bad luck on the iPhoto crash. I have to admit being attacked by a robotic helicopter is a rather peculiar start to any story.

  8. We have the same issues getting cartoons out of places like India, where even very poor people have cell phones but computers are relatively scarce.

    I’ve talked to cartoonists in South Africa who are willing to gather up cartoons from other parts of the continent via postal carrier and then upload them. I’m sure that photographers could do something similar.

    The Peace Corps might be helpful for this, because they do like to provide their volunteers with Internet access and they are all over Africa. But then, they would likely have to edit the photos that get through. I’m not sure how much they can stick their necks out.

  9. We have the same issues getting cartoons out of places like India, where even very poor people have cell phones but computers are relatively scarce.

    I’ve talked to cartoonists in South Africa who are willing to gather up cartoons from other parts of the continent via postal carrier and then upload them. I’m sure that photographers could do something similar.

    The Peace Corps might be helpful for this, because they do like to provide their volunteers with Internet access and they are all over Africa. But then, they would likely have to edit the photos that get through. I’m not sure how much they can stick their necks out.

  10. Robert, your photos are fantastic. Can’t wait to see everyone else’s. Thanks to everyone for coming out, I had a great time.

    Thanks especially to all the kind folks around Stanford who welcomed the photowalkers with open arms. A big shout out to Gabe Hoffmann and the other students from Stanford’s Hybrid System’s Lab for demoing their Scoble-seeking helicopters, Mark Gonnerman at the Aurora Forum for putting on the National Geographic All Roads panel, the docents at the Cantor Art Center for educating us on outdoor sculpture, and Cliff Harris for introducing us to the Clark Center and Stanford’s Initiative on Human Health. And of course, a special thanks to my lovely wife Kim and baby girl Elise (the smallest photowalker) for taking care of all the details I’m so good at forgetting (like plates for pizza, drinks, and maps).

    BTW, there was more than enough money collected for pizza, so I’ll be donating the extra to the Cantor Center :)

  11. Robert, your photos are fantastic. Can’t wait to see everyone else’s. Thanks to everyone for coming out, I had a great time.

    Thanks especially to all the kind folks around Stanford who welcomed the photowalkers with open arms. A big shout out to Gabe Hoffmann and the other students from Stanford’s Hybrid System’s Lab for demoing their Scoble-seeking helicopters, Mark Gonnerman at the Aurora Forum for putting on the National Geographic All Roads panel, the docents at the Cantor Art Center for educating us on outdoor sculpture, and Cliff Harris for introducing us to the Clark Center and Stanford’s Initiative on Human Health. And of course, a special thanks to my lovely wife Kim and baby girl Elise (the smallest photowalker) for taking care of all the details I’m so good at forgetting (like plates for pizza, drinks, and maps).

    BTW, there was more than enough money collected for pizza, so I’ll be donating the extra to the Cantor Center :)

  12. Anyone know where I can find a transcript of that panel? I thought on the whole it was constructive, but I didn’t really understand some of the responses during the Q&A session. At times it seemed like they ignored the questions entirely and instead used the opportunity to grind their ax.

    I’d really like to review the transcript to make sure I didn’t just miss something.

  13. Anyone know where I can find a transcript of that panel? I thought on the whole it was constructive, but I didn’t really understand some of the responses during the Q&A session. At times it seemed like they ignored the questions entirely and instead used the opportunity to grind their ax.

    I’d really like to review the transcript to make sure I didn’t just miss something.