Will videoblogs be outlawed because of California’s accessibility laws?

I’m watching this case where Target is in trouble with California’s accessibility laws. I’m wondering when they will come after the videoblogging industry. Go to YouTube. If you’re deaf isn’t that entire site inaccessible?

Now, imagine a world where every video is forced to get a transcript so that it’s accessible to deaf people? Yeah, some sites like mine would just pay to have transcripts done. But most video bloggers can’t afford that. So who would pay for this?

I couldn’t afford to do it for my Kyte.tv channel, for instance. So if there was a law that said that all videos needed to have transcripts so they were accessible I’d be forced to stop doing video.

I guess if such a law were enforced then we’d need a technology solution that would automatically add transcripts to our videos.

73 thoughts on “Will videoblogs be outlawed because of California’s accessibility laws?

  1. Choosing a venue for a blind date can be tricky. By definition, blind dates involve meeting someone you have limited or no blind date uncensored information about, so the best option is probably to keep it neutral and pick a universally popular dating location. A coffee date, drinks at a pub or a quiet dinner at a restaurant are safe options for blind dating.

  2. Choosing a venue for a blind date can be tricky. By definition, blind dates involve meeting someone you have limited or no blind date uncensored information about, so the best option is probably to keep it neutral and pick a universally popular dating location. A coffee date, drinks at a pub or a quiet dinner at a restaurant are safe options for blind dating.

  3. Well, in my opinion, it makes your site more accessible on other people not just on ordinary people and will also help the search-engine ranking especially with upcoming video search engines.

  4. Well, in my opinion, it makes your site more accessible on other people not just on ordinary people and will also help the search-engine ranking especially with upcoming video search engines.

  5. This is just typical politically correct bs. What about the blind? Will the same sites have to be shut down because blind people can’t see the videos? There’s no way to make the videos accessible to blind people.
    Sure, measures can be taken for navigation for the blind, but nothing can be done about the content of a site, if that content is visually oriented.
    Likewise for the deaf, sometimes things that go on with audio are for affect, and not just something you can put in a transcript. It seems ridiculous to try to legislate this.
    And after all, isn’t this free speech? For expression?

  6. This is just typical politically correct bs. What about the blind? Will the same sites have to be shut down because blind people can’t see the videos? There’s no way to make the videos accessible to blind people.
    Sure, measures can be taken for navigation for the blind, but nothing can be done about the content of a site, if that content is visually oriented.
    Likewise for the deaf, sometimes things that go on with audio are for affect, and not just something you can put in a transcript. It seems ridiculous to try to legislate this.
    And after all, isn’t this free speech? For expression?

  7. DotSub.com would fill the technology gap needed while also providing access in hundreds of languages. There are ways to make video more available to everyone, although I’m not sure if California will be the one to force it on us.

  8. DotSub.com would fill the technology gap needed while also providing access in hundreds of languages. There are ways to make video more available to everyone, although I’m not sure if California will be the one to force it on us.

  9. A friend of mine has trouble typing and has voice activated software for her computer. It recognizes what she says and types it up for her. Another option is for video makers to type up the transcript themselves. I think it is unfair to say the only way to make transcripts for videos is to hire someone. Making things accessible to more people is a good idea, I think that enforcement laws would give people the push they need to do the right thing.

  10. A friend of mine has trouble typing and has voice activated software for her computer. It recognizes what she says and types it up for her. Another option is for video makers to type up the transcript themselves. I think it is unfair to say the only way to make transcripts for videos is to hire someone. Making things accessible to more people is a good idea, I think that enforcement laws would give people the push they need to do the right thing.

  11. Before the internet became video-enabled, us Deaf people were empowered to be on a level playing field with the rest of the world. Since the proliferation of vlogs & videos, the communication barriers have slowly grown every day – leaving us marginalised once again as it is in the physical world. I would welcome some legalisation to prevent closed captioning becoming an afterthought. Not only it will make accessible for deaf people, there are people with ESOL who would like to read captions in case they might not understand the person’s accent.

    I would advocate businesses and governmental services to caption their videos. Can’t see it being enforceable on the home vlogging front so YouTube will be safe. All we can ask of you vloggers is to caption your vlogs or provide a transcript as a gesture of goodwill and in the spirit of freedom across the internet so the internet is not disabling us Deaf people.

  12. Before the internet became video-enabled, us Deaf people were empowered to be on a level playing field with the rest of the world. Since the proliferation of vlogs & videos, the communication barriers have slowly grown every day – leaving us marginalised once again as it is in the physical world. I would welcome some legalisation to prevent closed captioning becoming an afterthought. Not only it will make accessible for deaf people, there are people with ESOL who would like to read captions in case they might not understand the person’s accent.

    I would advocate businesses and governmental services to caption their videos. Can’t see it being enforceable on the home vlogging front so YouTube will be safe. All we can ask of you vloggers is to caption your vlogs or provide a transcript as a gesture of goodwill and in the spirit of freedom across the internet so the internet is not disabling us Deaf people.

  13. First, quit talking about “transcripts.” Captioning is how you make video accessible. And yeah, if you’re running a video “industry,” you need to grow up and make your videos accessible. Watched TV lately?

    Now, home videos are quite another matter.

    And at some point you’ll notice that the Target lawsuit involves accessibility for blind people, not deaf.

  14. First, quit talking about “transcripts.” Captioning is how you make video accessible. And yeah, if you’re running a video “industry,” you need to grow up and make your videos accessible. Watched TV lately?

    Now, home videos are quite another matter.

    And at some point you’ll notice that the Target lawsuit involves accessibility for blind people, not deaf.

  15. But ‘totally missing the point’ is Robert’s calling-card. Create a storm, get suckers to comment city and send in traffic, send in the correction later.

  16. But ‘totally missing the point’ is Robert’s calling-card. Create a storm, get suckers to comment city and send in traffic, send in the correction later.

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