Microsoft vs. Mozilla in ECMAScript debate, Part II

Words are heating up between Mozilla’s Brendan Eich (he’s the chief technical officer at Mozilla Corporation, the folks who bring us Firefox) and Microsoft’s Chris Wilson in the debate over the proposed ECMAScript 4th Edition. We haven’t heard the last of this and it’s interesting to see this play out in the public square. I’m scheduled to do some interviews already with Mozilla. Would love to have more to cover this issue more completely. I first reported on this friction on my blog last night and some of the comments there have been interesting.

UPDATE: I should have given credit to Ric of OpenAjax for starting this off and helping me see the conflict brewing here.

Comments

  1. Any chance we can get jquery built in? And oh ya, make a rich textarea an HTML element to lighten up the read write web? But I digress….

    Regarding the interchange, I do think Brendan could advance his points with a slightly less inflammatory opening paragraph. But then again, he is the one who has been in the debate.

  2. Any chance we can get jquery built in? And oh ya, make a rich textarea an HTML element to lighten up the read write web? But I digress….

    Regarding the interchange, I do think Brendan could advance his points with a slightly less inflammatory opening paragraph. But then again, he is the one who has been in the debate.

  3. Chris Wilson is one of those guys from the old IE team. He’s part of the team who created this monster web browser, compatible with just about nothing else on the planet.

    Regardless the issue with Javascript’s future, Chris Wilson should NOT be allowed to touch a keyboard ever again.

  4. Chris Wilson is one of those guys from the old IE team. He’s part of the team who created this monster web browser, compatible with just about nothing else on the planet.

    Regardless the issue with Javascript’s future, Chris Wilson should NOT be allowed to touch a keyboard ever again.

  5. Hey Ed,

    You could be right about my lead — perhaps I was inflamed by what sounded like serious charages against the majority in Ecma TG1, and me in particular, based on anonymous reports to Chris (since Chris was not involved in TG1; he sat in for two hours of the March meeting, but I think he was under the weather, and he didn’t say anything).

    It didn’t occur to me last night to avoid inflaming the inflamers, but I’ll try to do better next time.

    /be

  6. Hey Ed,

    You could be right about my lead — perhaps I was inflamed by what sounded like serious charages against the majority in Ecma TG1, and me in particular, based on anonymous reports to Chris (since Chris was not involved in TG1; he sat in for two hours of the March meeting, but I think he was under the weather, and he didn’t say anything).

    It didn’t occur to me last night to avoid inflaming the inflamers, but I’ll try to do better next time.

    /be

  7. Holy $hit!

    I didn’t know M$ could go any lower in their attempts to derail web progress!

    The web (mozilla, opera and apple) should move on and ignore those unethical bastards!

  8. Holy $hit!

    I didn’t know M$ could go any lower in their attempts to derail web progress!

    The web (mozilla, opera and apple) should move on and ignore those unethical bastards!

  9. I think it should be illegal to ship any Internet-enabled software that is not based on open standards. Full stop.

    The only browser out there that truly follows this ideal to the letter is Opera. Firefox comes close, but not totally. Konqueror actually does better than Firefox, but unfortunately it’s limited to running on *nix.

    Good coding to standards is what it is all about. Nothing else matters in software in the final analysis.

    The purpose of the Internet is communication. In order for everyone to communicate with everyone else, all programs must use open standards.

    People need to be conscientious of open standards and demand them.

  10. I think it should be illegal to ship any Internet-enabled software that is not based on open standards. Full stop.

    The only browser out there that truly follows this ideal to the letter is Opera. Firefox comes close, but not totally. Konqueror actually does better than Firefox, but unfortunately it’s limited to running on *nix.

    Good coding to standards is what it is all about. Nothing else matters in software in the final analysis.

    The purpose of the Internet is communication. In order for everyone to communicate with everyone else, all programs must use open standards.

    People need to be conscientious of open standards and demand them.

  11. @Northern

    Unfortunately, 99.999% (or more) of the web population doesn’t care, because “works good enough” is good enough.

    Only those of us who have to code around the farking browser bugs and inconsistencies are annoyed, eh?

  12. @Northern

    Unfortunately, 99.999% (or more) of the web population doesn’t care, because “works good enough” is good enough.

    Only those of us who have to code around the farking browser bugs and inconsistencies are annoyed, eh?

  13. Robert, you mentioned Brendan’s position at Mozilla, but maybe you should’ve mentioned that he’s the guy who created JavaScript – that seems particularly germane, and it may not be obvious to everyone.

  14. Robert, you mentioned Brendan’s position at Mozilla, but maybe you should’ve mentioned that he’s the guy who created JavaScript – that seems particularly germane, and it may not be obvious to everyone.

  15. Looks like there is more than heated discussion going on in a few places. Facebook & Google, Firefox & Microsoft, Rocky vs. the mummy… could get v-a-a-r-r-y interesting.

    Brian, thanks for the javascript bit, i didn’t know that, i’m sure most people don’t. Keep it coming!

  16. Looks like there is more than heated discussion going on in a few places. Facebook & Google, Firefox & Microsoft, Rocky vs. the mummy… could get v-a-a-r-r-y interesting.

    Brian, thanks for the javascript bit, i didn’t know that, i’m sure most people don’t. Keep it coming!