JumpBox, another example of virtualization goodness

Yesterday Sean Tierney, COO of JumpBox, came to the house to show me his service, which promises “server software made simple.”

Now if you’re an astute viewer of my videos you’ll notice that when I interview companies talking about server software that my attention isn’t quite as focused as, say, if I were interviewing someone talking about a new cell phone.

But I found my jaw dropping when I saw what JumpBox does. It lets me setup a complete virtualized server system with Linux, a database, and various other things like WordPress within minutes. Doing that all without a system like JumpBox? Would take hours. And that’s IF I knew what I was doing!

Anyway, thanks Sean. Great stuff for geeks who need to try out lots of server iterations and move those things around. That video will be up in a couple of weeks. Will let you know when it’s up.

21 thoughts on “JumpBox, another example of virtualization goodness

  1. I like this whole class of applications. 3tera is the one to watch – it is like Jumpbox + scaling all the layers (IP addressing, storage and applications)across the universe.

  2. I like this whole class of applications. 3tera is the one to watch – it is like Jumpbox + scaling all the layers (IP addressing, storage and applications)across the universe.

  3. Greg above says: “One click application deployment on hosted servers is nothing new. Dreamhost has been doing it for ages with the same apps.”

    Pretty sure dreamhost deploys “appz” from their application vault which is part of Plesk control panel. If you used it, it sucks.

    I imagine Jumpbox (when it fully matures) will let anyone, on any platform, deploy any app, in minutes. Sounds pretty killer, and disruptive, to me.

  4. Greg above says: “One click application deployment on hosted servers is nothing new. Dreamhost has been doing it for ages with the same apps.”

    Pretty sure dreamhost deploys “appz” from their application vault which is part of Plesk control panel. If you used it, it sucks.

    I imagine Jumpbox (when it fully matures) will let anyone, on any platform, deploy any app, in minutes. Sounds pretty killer, and disruptive, to me.

  5. Not really that impressed to be honest. The only thing that makes this even moderately interesting is the roll your own server bit. One click application deployment on hosted servers is nothing new. Dreamhost has been doing it for ages with the same apps.

  6. Not really that impressed to be honest. The only thing that makes this even moderately interesting is the roll your own server bit. One click application deployment on hosted servers is nothing new. Dreamhost has been doing it for ages with the same apps.

  7. @3,

    Linux us NOT a cult. It’s just a kernel, then various companies throw a bunch of userland utilities and programs around it and call it a distro.

    I think what you are referring to is the GPL fanboys — you know — the “open source or nothing zealots”. Linux in and of itself is fine and is a good tool in certain situations. I personally prefer the BSDSs, though, because I think the BSD license makes more sense.

  8. @3,

    Linux us NOT a cult. It’s just a kernel, then various companies throw a bunch of userland utilities and programs around it and call it a distro.

    I think what you are referring to is the GPL fanboys — you know — the “open source or nothing zealots”. Linux in and of itself is fine and is a good tool in certain situations. I personally prefer the BSDSs, though, because I think the BSD license makes more sense.

  9. This could be useful for when Second Life goes to host your own. And if this Jumpbox thing also is for dummies, or could be made for dummies, so you just pick out a slice of the server(s) you need with a for-dummies template to run them it could be great.

    I don’t like Linux, tho. It’s a cult.

  10. This could be useful for when Second Life goes to host your own. And if this Jumpbox thing also is for dummies, or could be made for dummies, so you just pick out a slice of the server(s) you need with a for-dummies template to run them it could be great.

    I don’t like Linux, tho. It’s a cult.

  11. Cannot resist this moment to point out that JumpBox is an Arizona company, not a Bay Area company. I like to remind people that we in the desert do more than play golf and trade real estate:-)

  12. Cannot resist this moment to point out that JumpBox is an Arizona company, not a Bay Area company. I like to remind people that we in the desert do more than play golf and trade real estate:-)

  13. This is a really cool product and there have been VM appliances for a while now that make it super easy to setup a server but I think that also can be a negative.

    End users setting up internet facing Linux machines is a really a scary thing. I spend most of my days fending off spam and remote exploits from machines that have been taken over because of weak passwords and little/no maintenance. The same problem came about with so many easily installed PHP applications.

  14. This is a really cool product and there have been VM appliances for a while now that make it super easy to setup a server but I think that also can be a negative.

    End users setting up internet facing Linux machines is a really a scary thing. I spend most of my days fending off spam and remote exploits from machines that have been taken over because of weak passwords and little/no maintenance. The same problem came about with so many easily installed PHP applications.

  15. There are good things and bad things about virtualization.

    Good:
    Save money on hardware
    Save money on software
    Fast

    Bad:
    Hardware companies will begin to decline when virtualization becomes the norm. If you need less hardware, you’ll buy less. And others will buy less, too. We’ve all known that the days of big iron are declining. Despite what you read about IBM, Sun, etc. I’m seeing it in data centers, on the job. People are moving to virtualization quickly. Why buy 10 Sun servers when you only need a couple.

    Linux is starting to take off. And I’m not talking about on the desktop. The desktop belongs to MS and Apple. Linux on the desktop is still a nascent, niche market despite Ubuntu. Linux has a lot of problems to overcome, not the least of which is drivers.

    Virtualization is cool and promising, but like anything, there are caveats.

  16. There are good things and bad things about virtualization.

    Good:
    Save money on hardware
    Save money on software
    Fast

    Bad:
    Hardware companies will begin to decline when virtualization becomes the norm. If you need less hardware, you’ll buy less. And others will buy less, too. We’ve all known that the days of big iron are declining. Despite what you read about IBM, Sun, etc. I’m seeing it in data centers, on the job. People are moving to virtualization quickly. Why buy 10 Sun servers when you only need a couple.

    Linux is starting to take off. And I’m not talking about on the desktop. The desktop belongs to MS and Apple. Linux on the desktop is still a nascent, niche market despite Ubuntu. Linux has a lot of problems to overcome, not the least of which is drivers.

    Virtualization is cool and promising, but like anything, there are caveats.

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