I love hanging out with authors

Four authors at one small party. Just got back from it. Mighty weird. Of course the cell phone came out.

The highlight was meeting Christine Comaford-Lynch who wrote “Rules for Renegades.” She’s in the video I shot on my cell phone. Drat that it ran out of memory cause I didn’t delete the videos from BugLabs yet. I also give Tim Ferriss heck for “working six hours a week.” (His book is titled the Four Hour Workweek).

She worked at Microsoft back in the 1980s. They wouldn’t hire her because she’s “a chick who didn’t graduate from high school.” But she could code and she could run companies (she’s run five now so far).

The party was hosted by Teresa Rodriguez Williamson, founder of Tango Diva and author of “Fly Solo” which is a book for women who want to travel the world. She also is the founder of Tango Diva and lives about a block away from us. She always has the most amazing people over her house — and I’m not talking about me.

Hope your weekend was as interesting and as fun as ours was.

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Comments

  1. Interesting people around the table at a party is what makes life exciting. I enjoy it when I find myself at a party with captivating souls. Authors always seem to have something cool to say (or they would not have been motivated to write a book)

    I have read both these books, and these are the two authors of the 30 books I read this year I most want to meet. It was funny to see them both in your video. Not sure I can “check off” my list of having met them by watching your video.

    Comaford-Lynch seems delighful, per your video.

  2. Interesting people around the table at a party is what makes life exciting. I enjoy it when I find myself at a party with captivating souls. Authors always seem to have something cool to say (or they would not have been motivated to write a book)

    I have read both these books, and these are the two authors of the 30 books I read this year I most want to meet. It was funny to see them both in your video. Not sure I can “check off” my list of having met them by watching your video.

    Comaford-Lynch seems delighful, per your video.

  3. Met Christine at a conference she keynoted. I got to have lunch with her as a part of the conference package and she is VERY likable. Our table talked for a long time and she gave us insights we wouldn’t have gotten from just a keynote. I enjoyed my time with her at lunch and would love to just sit and talk with her a bit more.

  4. Met Christine at a conference she keynoted. I got to have lunch with her as a part of the conference package and she is VERY likable. Our table talked for a long time and she gave us insights we wouldn’t have gotten from just a keynote. I enjoyed my time with her at lunch and would love to just sit and talk with her a bit more.

  5. Don’t mean this as snarky, rude or anything, just curious. With hyphenated names like Comaford-Lynch, what happens with the next generation, say the daughter marries a Jones. Is it then Comaford-Lynch-Jones? And then the next daughter marries a Smith is it Comaford-Lynch-Jones-Smith? Does this just keep extending or at some point do names start getting dropped?

  6. Don’t mean this as snarky, rude or anything, just curious. With hyphenated names like Comaford-Lynch, what happens with the next generation, say the daughter marries a Jones. Is it then Comaford-Lynch-Jones? And then the next daughter marries a Smith is it Comaford-Lynch-Jones-Smith? Does this just keep extending or at some point do names start getting dropped?

  7. With hyphenated names like Comaford-Lynch, what happens with the next generation, say the daughter marries a Jones.

    Did you try asking the daughter? :)

    Common permutations are described at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Married_and_maiden_names

    The Wikipedia article is quite thorough on subject, describing even differences between cultures. However it neglects to mention that in Geek Culture, when two geeks marry, they often solve this problem by conforming to RFC 1035 and adopting a DNS-style hierarchical dot notation for offspring (e.g. Sally Smith.Jones.Lynch.Comaford).

    Some groups within Geek Culture have taken to URL encoding child names (e.g. Joe%20Bob). But this is widely regarded to be silly.

  8. With hyphenated names like Comaford-Lynch, what happens with the next generation, say the daughter marries a Jones.

    Did you try asking the daughter? :)

    Common permutations are described at:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Married_and_maiden_names

    The Wikipedia article is quite thorough on subject, describing even differences between cultures. However it neglects to mention that in Geek Culture, when two geeks marry, they often solve this problem by conforming to RFC 1035 and adopting a DNS-style hierarchical dot notation for offspring (e.g. Sally Smith.Jones.Lynch.Comaford).

    Some groups within Geek Culture have taken to URL encoding child names (e.g. Joe%20Bob). But this is widely regarded to be silly.

  9. Worry not, PXLated, only *my* last name is hyphenated. My husband’s is simply Lynch. To top it off, we have a son only!

    Thom, you’ll meet met at the Rules For Renegades Summit. I’ll look forward to hanging out with you then, or sooner if an event on RulesForRenegades.com/Live.html. Register for the Summit at RulesForRenegades.com/Summit. You’ll need to bring the 2 free tickets from your copy of the book.

  10. Worry not, PXLated, only *my* last name is hyphenated. My husband’s is simply Lynch. To top it off, we have a son only!

    Thom, you’ll meet met at the Rules For Renegades Summit. I’ll look forward to hanging out with you then, or sooner if an event on RulesForRenegades.com/Live.html. Register for the Summit at RulesForRenegades.com/Summit. You’ll need to bring the 2 free tickets from your copy of the book.