Bloggers: hot new commenting system from Disqus

Dave Winer uses it. Fred Wilson uses it. Russell Beattie uses it. Steven Hodson uses it.

What is it? Disqus.

I have an interview/demo with Disqus’ CEO that explains why lots of top bloggers are switching their comment system to Disqus.

I really wish I could use Disqus on my blog, but it doesn’t work with WordPress.com. Matt Mullenweg and Toni Schneider, any way we can get this added?

[podtech content=http://media1.podtech.net/media/2007/12/PID_013131/Podtech_DisQus.flv&postURL=http://www.podtech.net/home/4672/lets-disqus-a-new-commenting-system-for-your-blog&totalTime=1218000&breadcrumb=7a90f3c5c0f246119855766838a8e9a3]

Comments

  1. My min concern over third party commenting systems like this is portability. Is it easy to get your comments out of disqus if you want to move services? Can you revert to the built-in commenting system in your blog platform without losing the comments in disqus?

  2. My min concern over third party commenting systems like this is portability. Is it easy to get your comments out of disqus if you want to move services? Can you revert to the built-in commenting system in your blog platform without losing the comments in disqus?

  3. It works great on Blogspot and it’s very cool to share the same ecosystem with other bloggers I like. But I agree with Ian, it needs to be portable for it to be a viable solution. People switch blogs and platforms all the time, comments should migrate with them.

  4. It works great on Blogspot and it’s very cool to share the same ecosystem with other bloggers I like. But I agree with Ian, it needs to be portable for it to be a viable solution. People switch blogs and platforms all the time, comments should migrate with them.

  5. Yep, I third Ian’s concern. I just gave the WP plugin a try. It worked fine, and I like the functionality it offers, but I don’t want my site’s comments living somewhere else. I may sound like some ol’ school curmudgeon, but my site’s comments belong in my database. If they could make that happen, I’d sign up in a second.

  6. Yep, I third Ian’s concern. I just gave the WP plugin a try. It worked fine, and I like the functionality it offers, but I don’t want my site’s comments living somewhere else. I may sound like some ol’ school curmudgeon, but my site’s comments belong in my database. If they could make that happen, I’d sign up in a second.

  7. @4 I agree; I think the comments should stay on the blogger’s site and not on a 3rd party’s server.

    @Robert – This is very nice, thanks for highlighting it.

  8. @4 I agree; I think the comments should stay on the blogger’s site and not on a 3rd party’s server.

    @Robert – This is very nice, thanks for highlighting it.

  9. The problem with all these comment ‘replacement’ systems (Co-comment, disqus, etc) is that they are fragmenting the commenting space, so that you have to become members of multiple systems and even further fragment your own personal space. I think for it to work they all need to start supporting OpenID to open up the system and remove the barrier of ‘another sign-up’

    We are doing something completely different at fav.or.it and playing connect-the-dots by removing barriers and working ‘with’ the current systems rather than replacing and fragmenting.

  10. The problem with all these comment ‘replacement’ systems (Co-comment, disqus, etc) is that they are fragmenting the commenting space, so that you have to become members of multiple systems and even further fragment your own personal space. I think for it to work they all need to start supporting OpenID to open up the system and remove the barrier of ‘another sign-up’

    We are doing something completely different at fav.or.it and playing connect-the-dots by removing barriers and working ‘with’ the current systems rather than replacing and fragmenting.

  11. For anyone interested, we(Intense Debate) already address the concerns above:
    1) We support OpenID and have for a while
    2) Your comment system data is portable (with the click of one button, for those using WordPress and Blogger, your comments can be reverted back to their original form [not available in other systems]. Also, at any time and for all platforms publishers can download an xml file of all their comment data.

    I think what Nick is doing is cool, but it still doesn’t solve the problems inherent with factory installed comment systems: Comments become unreadable, conversation is squashed, no good way to learn more about the person behind the comment, etc. A lot of people want more out of their comments and we give them many tools to this end.

  12. For anyone interested, we(Intense Debate) already address the concerns above:
    1) We support OpenID and have for a while
    2) Your comment system data is portable (with the click of one button, for those using WordPress and Blogger, your comments can be reverted back to their original form [not available in other systems]. Also, at any time and for all platforms publishers can download an xml file of all their comment data.

    I think what Nick is doing is cool, but it still doesn’t solve the problems inherent with factory installed comment systems: Comments become unreadable, conversation is squashed, no good way to learn more about the person behind the comment, etc. A lot of people want more out of their comments and we give them many tools to this end.

  13. It’s hard to trust a third party to be there in 10 years. I think it might be a cool application, but then you have to really think about the ramifications of giving a key part of your content to a third party.

  14. It’s hard to trust a third party to be there in 10 years. I think it might be a cool application, but then you have to really think about the ramifications of giving a key part of your content to a third party.

  15. I’m not so sure about the comments having to live on my server. To some extent, I can see where a common comment repository will enable some functionality to draw more people into commenting. Think coComment, only it works.

    I’d consider this as soon as Drupal integration is available.

  16. I’m not so sure about the comments having to live on my server. To some extent, I can see where a common comment repository will enable some functionality to draw more people into commenting. Think coComment, only it works.

    I’d consider this as soon as Drupal integration is available.

  17. Josh, that’s fantastic I think everyone adopting OpenID solves the problem, then everyone can just choose what style of commenting (and what features) and can swap/change as they want without affecting the end user.

    From our point of view we want to work with everyone, the commenting part of fav.or.it is there to simplify things for our ‘less techy’ users, so we want to integrate with everyone else’s system (we are already in talks with some), Josh if you want to drop me a line we should talk as we don’t see ourselves as a competitor in this marketplace.

  18. Josh, that’s fantastic I think everyone adopting OpenID solves the problem, then everyone can just choose what style of commenting (and what features) and can swap/change as they want without affecting the end user.

    From our point of view we want to work with everyone, the commenting part of fav.or.it is there to simplify things for our ‘less techy’ users, so we want to integrate with everyone else’s system (we are already in talks with some), Josh if you want to drop me a line we should talk as we don’t see ourselves as a competitor in this marketplace.

  19. I’m gonna second Intense Debate. I had it running on my wordpress blog and it worked great. I recently switched over to a tumblr and within a few hours Intense Debate contacted me and offered to enable tumblr support on my account (it’s in private beta I believe).

    They have a great service and an even better team

  20. I’m gonna second Intense Debate. I had it running on my wordpress blog and it worked great. I recently switched over to a tumblr and within a few hours Intense Debate contacted me and offered to enable tumblr support on my account (it’s in private beta I believe).

    They have a great service and an even better team

  21. Very fun meeting and chatting with you, Robert.

    Thanks for the feedback, everyone else. We don’t like the idea of further fragmenting anything so we’d like to be as open with our service as we can. We’re a believer of OpenID but there’s a certain implementation that we’re doing that we hope to show off soon.

    One of the biggest concerns people have is the fact that we’re a 3rd party and a hosted solution. We hear ya and it means a lot to us. A lot of time was spent making sure we’re a service you can rely on and I’m happy to report that we are at 0 downtime.

    Nick, Josh: Happy to work together to make life easier for the web. daniel@disqus.com

    Re Tumblr: We have a great Tumblr community and it’s been growing incredibly fast since we launched.

  22. Very fun meeting and chatting with you, Robert.

    Thanks for the feedback, everyone else. We don’t like the idea of further fragmenting anything so we’d like to be as open with our service as we can. We’re a believer of OpenID but there’s a certain implementation that we’re doing that we hope to show off soon.

    One of the biggest concerns people have is the fact that we’re a 3rd party and a hosted solution. We hear ya and it means a lot to us. A lot of time was spent making sure we’re a service you can rely on and I’m happy to report that we are at 0 downtime.

    Nick, Josh: Happy to work together to make life easier for the web. daniel@disqus.com

    Re Tumblr: We have a great Tumblr community and it’s been growing incredibly fast since we launched.

  23. I have a hard time seeing why WordPress.com would want to support Disqus. In a way, they almost have their own little exclusive comment community and to lose the exclusivity of it would be giving other systems (Disqus) a way in.

    If Disqus is going to compete, it will need to keep the comments mirrored in the original database. Only storing comments remotely is a huge bother for me.

  24. I have a hard time seeing why WordPress.com would want to support Disqus. In a way, they almost have their own little exclusive comment community and to lose the exclusivity of it would be giving other systems (Disqus) a way in.

    If Disqus is going to compete, it will need to keep the comments mirrored in the original database. Only storing comments remotely is a huge bother for me.

  25. Shivanand,

    Robert actually meant WordPress.com, the hosted service. The self-hosted WordPress.org installation absolutely works with Disqus.

    Thanks for using Disqus!

  26. Shivanand,

    Robert actually meant WordPress.com, the hosted service. The self-hosted WordPress.org installation absolutely works with Disqus.

    Thanks for using Disqus!

  27. Disqus has revolutionized commenting on my blog. My comments are up and people aren’t emailing me everyday telling me that they don’t understand how typepad comments work.

    The killer feature is replying to comments via email. Pull out my blackberry and I’m commenting on the go.

  28. Disqus has revolutionized commenting on my blog. My comments are up and people aren’t emailing me everyday telling me that they don’t understand how typepad comments work.

    The killer feature is replying to comments via email. Pull out my blackberry and I’m commenting on the go.

  29. The Claim Identity is not working :(
    I had a bunch of comments there and then registered but when I try to claim my identity it “logs in” and goes back to the front page… :o

    I still have to see the value of a hosted commenting system, with a forum… I’ll have to see more features off of Disqus before I can think of it being truly useful!

    Thanks for the video. I was wondering who they were after seeing it on Dave Winer’s blog! :)

  30. The Claim Identity is not working :(
    I had a bunch of comments there and then registered but when I try to claim my identity it “logs in” and goes back to the front page… :o

    I still have to see the value of a hosted commenting system, with a forum… I’ll have to see more features off of Disqus before I can think of it being truly useful!

    Thanks for the video. I was wondering who they were after seeing it on Dave Winer’s blog! :)

  31. Right … getting it on WordPress.com … but maybe that’s precipitous.

    You’ve seen IntenseDebate, yes? For whatever reason (Call me perverse; it wouldn’t be the first time), even though ID has such high production values, I lean towards DisqUs.

    Which doesn’t address the real problematic. And that, for me, is the creation of a new set of informations silos.

    Shared comments? Great … I’m on ID, say. I certainly wouldn’t be the only one. And you’re on DisqUs, say. And likewise, you wouldn’t be alone there. Then there’s our friends that are using CoComment …

    I don’t just talk about my “discourse-based document portal” because I’m a fanatic with regards to “participatory deliberation”; I see the need for something more fundamental, more foundational, more elemental … is why I veered away from concept mapping so many years ago. (My “Many2Many is only a shell right now; I know what happens to voices from the wilderness: they get swamped by voices that are acknowledged as marketers.)

    Glasperlenspiel, anyone?

  32. Right … getting it on WordPress.com … but maybe that’s precipitous.

    You’ve seen IntenseDebate, yes? For whatever reason (Call me perverse; it wouldn’t be the first time), even though ID has such high production values, I lean towards DisqUs.

    Which doesn’t address the real problematic. And that, for me, is the creation of a new set of informations silos.

    Shared comments? Great … I’m on ID, say. I certainly wouldn’t be the only one. And you’re on DisqUs, say. And likewise, you wouldn’t be alone there. Then there’s our friends that are using CoComment …

    I don’t just talk about my “discourse-based document portal” because I’m a fanatic with regards to “participatory deliberation”; I see the need for something more fundamental, more foundational, more elemental … is why I veered away from concept mapping so many years ago. (My “Many2Many is only a shell right now; I know what happens to voices from the wilderness: they get swamped by voices that are acknowledged as marketers.)

    Glasperlenspiel, anyone?

  33. I have been looking at Disqus over the last few days and finally implemented it on my blog today – I had concerns over comment ownership, but in the end there are just too many benefits (integration with Friendfeed being one of them)

  34. I have been looking at Disqus over the last few days and finally implemented it on my blog today – I had concerns over comment ownership, but in the end there are just too many benefits (integration with Friendfeed being one of them)

  35. Disqus is Great! Currently there are some “comment plugins” which can let a page have function of comment.The best one I know is Disqus With greater control and commenter profiles. this plugins is really cool, I love it. Thanks for Sharing..

  36. RSS feed that I saved of the comments into my database, but have so far been unsuccessful. If anyone knows of a way to do this, I would love to get that information.Yes, I have the two widgets installed on my blog for showing the Disqus comments, but the mere fact that they aren't WITH the post they were set for is disturbing to me.Maybe I'm too hrsaccount much of a control freak. It's the DBA in me — I want my data where I can access it and control it.As for video commenting, well, I'm on the fence on that one

  37. What's cool about Disqus is that it makes it painlessly easy to comment, and does a good job at blocking automated spam.

  38. It worked fine, and I like the functionality it offers, but I don't want my site's comments living somewhere else. I may sound like some ol' school curmudgeon, but my site's comments belong in my database. If they could make that happen, I'd sign up in a second.