Davos Question: How to improve the world? My answer: Peas!

The World Economic Forum, which I’m going to attend with Loic Le Meur, Mike Arrington, and a few other people, is asking people a question: how would you improve the world. More on that in a second. Loic Le Meur wrote a post about preparing for Davos.

This proves I’m not really cool, and certainly not really rich, because the really cool or rich attendees from Silicon Valley are flying over on the Google Jet (or some other corporate jet) and not sitting in coach, like we are. Yeah, yeah, I know that some people get invites to fly over on the Google Jet. I know one CEO who went on the Google jet last year, along with a group of Google execs (Google, this year, is throwing a big party at the WEF, also known simply as “Davos”). They asked people to not take pictures on the jet and not talk about it, so my source asked me not to reveal who he is. From what my source told me it’s a pretty nice way to fly to Switzerland, though.

I’d love to come out with a statement that “I’m above being bought off by the Googlers and I won’t accept a ride on the jet, even if offered.” Unfortunately, I’m not so noble. But they probably won’t invite me anyway for fears that I’ll turn on my cell phone and video you what it’s like.

Anyway, back to the Davos question.

My answer? Peas.

“Peas?”

Yeah, peas.

You gotta understand that peas made Susan Reynolds world a little better (she has breast cancer, is going into surgery on Friday) and people on Twitter are changing their icons to have peas in solidarity with her. She explains the role peas played in her comfort. Susan is someone I’ve followed for years and she has a blog where she’s talking about her experiences with breast cancer.

Plus, if the world had more peas there’d be less hungry people. So, peas is my answer and I’m sticking to it.

Give that cancer hell Susan! Or, if that doesn’t work, peas will do the job.

70 thoughts on “Davos Question: How to improve the world? My answer: Peas!

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  2. This is David from over at the American Cancer Society. Thanks for posting about this and helping us fund life saving research into Breast Cancer. Susan’s story is truly inspirational and we hope this fundraiser will help spread her story far and wide. And thanks for being a American Cancer Society volunteer Scoble!

    For those of you giving money please know that The American Society has invested more in breast cancer research grants over time than any other voluntary public health organization – $322.7 million since 1972! And thanks for giving! Maybe we can all form a virtual team at a Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk in 2008?

  3. This is David from over at the American Cancer Society. Thanks for posting about this and helping us fund life saving research into Breast Cancer. Susan’s story is truly inspirational and we hope this fundraiser will help spread her story far and wide. And thanks for being a American Cancer Society volunteer Scoble!

    For those of you giving money please know that The American Society has invested more in breast cancer research grants over time than any other voluntary public health organization – $322.7 million since 1972! And thanks for giving! Maybe we can all form a virtual team at a Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk in 2008?

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  5. stop farting around with silly high tech ideas like the olpc and spend the mony on cheap and easy ways to improve poor peoples lives.

    Improved acces to clean drinking water will do far more in say the deastert areas of brazil than some feel good olpc child project. (25% death rate for kids up to the age of 5 in that area)

  6. stop farting around with silly high tech ideas like the olpc and spend the mony on cheap and easy ways to improve poor peoples lives.

    Improved acces to clean drinking water will do far more in say the deastert areas of brazil than some feel good olpc child project. (25% death rate for kids up to the age of 5 in that area)

  7. The pea phenomenon only goes to show the very positive side of building a community. It gives one hope in the grand scheme of things. All that was needed was the medium for compassion that was already there to surface.

  8. The pea phenomenon only goes to show the very positive side of building a community. It gives one hope in the grand scheme of things. All that was needed was the medium for compassion that was already there to surface.

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