The RIAA is right

UPDATE: turns out that the blogs I read yesterday weren’t quite accurate. Engadget updated their post. Sorry for passing that along.

I see a lot of you are pissed off at the RIAA for saying that you can’t rip your own CDs.

Me? I think they are right.

Why?

1. Cause no one should copy Britney Spears, not to mention listen to her. The RIAA is doing us a service by making sure we don’t listen to her. Oh, and the RIAA is so brilliant that they brought us Britney in the first place (and now Hannah Montana) and that’s evidence enough that they are right and we should listen to them.
2. Because no one should be allowed to use music how they want. For instance, I hate using a CD player. Why? That requires me to get off the couch, find the darn CD and hope I put it away properly after that fun party, and then find the song I want instead of just opening iTunes from my couch and clicking on the right song. The RIAA is doing us a service by forcing us to get off the couch and get some exercise.
3. Bits have feelings too. Turning them from 0 to 1 hurts them.
4. They’ll force the kids to buy non-DRM music from the get go and not buy any CDs. Good for the environment! (My son, Patrick, says he only buys MP3′s or AAC’s without DRM now off of his online music stores).
5. This behavior will make sure people buy (or steal) music directly from bands. See how Radiohead did it. By doing that the price for music will go down thanks to fewer intermediaries. RIAA is just helping us get rid of them, which is good for everyone who loves music. See, they are on our side! I’m looking for a site that lets us do Vendor Relationship Management with bands. Doc Searls taught me about VRM. What is that? When we can get the company to do what WE want. Radiohead put the power of setting the price in OUR hands. Brilliant.
6. My son says that since they are making stealing music so dangerous (the kids are hearing the stories about parents getting sued for hundreds of thosuands of dollars) that they are getting paranoid about stealing music. So, what do they do instead? Have you heard of iPod trading? You will. Ahh, and we thought “sneaker net” was dead? Yeah, right. The RIAA brought it back.

See, we should all thank the RIAA for doing such a great job and making our lives better!

133 thoughts on “The RIAA is right

  1. Actually the RIAA are getting people to think more about how they license their content, and what content people will buy based on what license terms apply. I’ve started looking for non-RIAA affiliated bands to get on my iPod; I’m downloading iTunes Plus tracks rather than DRMed stuff, and just lately I discovered a site that while at the moment there’s not a lot there, pretty soon I reckon it’ll be a big thing. CASHMusic.org is a site set up by Donita Sparks (ex-L7) and so far features music from Kristin Hersh (ex-Throwing Muses). Donita’s expected to publish some of her own stuff there shortly. Basically they’re releasing content under a Creative Commons license with the idea that people visiting the site will be able to download, listen to, re-mix, mash-up, cover, re-word, re-arrange, pretty much do what they want with it, as long as any derived content is itself published under the same license. The two tracks Kristin has published there have already spawned 2 dozen derived works, some good, some not-so-good. It’s definitely worth a look.

  2. Actually the RIAA are getting people to think more about how they license their content, and what content people will buy based on what license terms apply. I’ve started looking for non-RIAA affiliated bands to get on my iPod; I’m downloading iTunes Plus tracks rather than DRMed stuff, and just lately I discovered a site that while at the moment there’s not a lot there, pretty soon I reckon it’ll be a big thing. CASHMusic.org is a site set up by Donita Sparks (ex-L7) and so far features music from Kristin Hersh (ex-Throwing Muses). Donita’s expected to publish some of her own stuff there shortly. Basically they’re releasing content under a Creative Commons license with the idea that people visiting the site will be able to download, listen to, re-mix, mash-up, cover, re-word, re-arrange, pretty much do what they want with it, as long as any derived content is itself published under the same license. The two tracks Kristin has published there have already spawned 2 dozen derived works, some good, some not-so-good. It’s definitely worth a look.

  3. Actually the RIAA are getting people to think more about how they license their content, and what content people will buy based on what license terms apply. I’ve started looking for non-RIAA affiliated bands to get on my iPod; I’m downloading iTunes Plus tracks rather than DRMed stuff, and just lately I discovered a site that while at the moment there’s not a lot there, pretty soon I reckon it’ll be a big thing. CASHMusic.org is a site set up by Donita Sparks (ex-L7) and so far features music from Kristin Hersh (ex-Throwing Muses). Donita’s expected to publish some of her own stuff there shortly. Basically they’re releasing content under a Creative Commons license with the idea that people visiting the site will be able to download, listen to, re-mix, mash-up, cover, re-word, re-arrange, pretty much do what they want with it, as long as any derived content is itself published under the same license. The two tracks Kristin has published there have already spawned 2 dozen derived works, some good, some not-so-good. It’s definitely worth a look.

  4. Anyone been to a music store lately? Exactly. Just passing by it in the mall, you can smell the death of an industry coming shortly.

  5. Anyone been to a music store lately? Exactly. Just passing by it in the mall, you can smell the death of an industry coming shortly.

  6. Anyone been to a music store lately? Exactly. Just passing by it in the mall, you can smell the death of an industry coming shortly.

  7. I’ve quite buying music, essentially quit lisenting to music except the few thousand Cd’s I acuired over the years, and quit going to concerts.

    Think about Pink Floyd Dark Side of the Moon. I bought it at least twice on 8-track, at least three times on album, at least once on cassette, at three three times on CD, and now they want to buy buy it again on I-Tunes. No thanks, I’ll do without. Pass the wine…..

  8. I’ve quite buying music, essentially quit lisenting to music except the few thousand Cd’s I acuired over the years, and quit going to concerts.

    Think about Pink Floyd Dark Side of the Moon. I bought it at least twice on 8-track, at least three times on album, at least once on cassette, at three three times on CD, and now they want to buy buy it again on I-Tunes. No thanks, I’ll do without. Pass the wine…..

  9. I’ve quite buying music, essentially quit lisenting to music except the few thousand Cd’s I acuired over the years, and quit going to concerts.

    Think about Pink Floyd Dark Side of the Moon. I bought it at least twice on 8-track, at least three times on album, at least once on cassette, at three three times on CD, and now they want to buy buy it again on I-Tunes. No thanks, I’ll do without. Pass the wine…..

  10. Thank you, Shelley and Jerry, for helping set the record straight here. It’s why I always try and read the comments, something the traditional press doesn’t generally offer.

    I do want to add that your use of this matter to blast “citizens media” is not in keeping with your general interest in facts, for the Washington Post played a rather big role in this, too.

    At least here, I have the opportunity to read your input, and that is something we all appreciate — perhaps more than you realize.

  11. Thank you, Shelley and Jerry, for helping set the record straight here. It’s why I always try and read the comments, something the traditional press doesn’t generally offer.

    I do want to add that your use of this matter to blast “citizens media” is not in keeping with your general interest in facts, for the Washington Post played a rather big role in this, too.

    At least here, I have the opportunity to read your input, and that is something we all appreciate — perhaps more than you realize.

  12. Thank you, Shelley and Jerry, for helping set the record straight here. It’s why I always try and read the comments, something the traditional press doesn’t generally offer.

    I do want to add that your use of this matter to blast “citizens media” is not in keeping with your general interest in facts, for the Washington Post played a rather big role in this, too.

    At least here, I have the opportunity to read your input, and that is something we all appreciate — perhaps more than you realize.

  13. Regardless of the fact that the main aim of the lawsuits is illegal file sharing, the RIAA is claiming that the personal digital copies of your own legitimate CDs are illegal. Even if the RIAA never sues anyone for making such copies, they’re essentially claiming they can sue anyone whenever they want for making such copies, which is completely ridiculous.

  14. Regardless of the fact that the main aim of the lawsuits is illegal file sharing, the RIAA is claiming that the personal digital copies of your own legitimate CDs are illegal. Even if the RIAA never sues anyone for making such copies, they’re essentially claiming they can sue anyone whenever they want for making such copies, which is completely ridiculous.

  15. Regardless of the fact that the main aim of the lawsuits is illegal file sharing, the RIAA is claiming that the personal digital copies of your own legitimate CDs are illegal. Even if the RIAA never sues anyone for making such copies, they’re essentially claiming they can sue anyone whenever they want for making such copies, which is completely ridiculous.

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