What I was using to hit Facebook — unreleased Plaxo Pulse

OK, so I’ve been released from my NDA. I was alpha testing an upcoming feature of Plaxo Pulse — this feature has not yet been released and now that my account has gotten shut down it’s not clear whether it will be released. It is a Facebook importer that works just like any other address book importer.

What does it collect?

Names and email address and birthday.

Why those? Because it’s trying to connect Facebook names with names in its database.

For instance, it learned that of the 5,000 people in my Facebook account about 1,800 were already on Plaxo.

It did NOT look at anything else. Just this stuff, no social graph data. No personal information.

Why do this?

I wanted to get all my contacts into my Microsoft Outlook address book and hook them up with the Plaxo system, which 1,800 of my friends are already on.

It’s ironic that you can import your Gmail address book into Facebook but you can’t export back out.

Comments

  1. As a Plaxo user myself I can see the benefits of doing this. Facebook should bite the bullet and open up, after all as you say they are quite happy to harvest data in other systems. Maybe the other systems should shut Facebook out of the loop.

  2. Wow. Big fan of Plaxo so am amazed this would cause a fuss.

    BTW, was able to download (not synch) with the Fb app FriendsCSV THEN will synch with Plaxo (after the import into Outlook). Ya, a lot of steps, but has worked.

    One piece MISSING from the app though.. no e-mail address.

    The disruption continues… ;-)

  3. Wow. Big fan of Plaxo so am amazed this would cause a fuss.

    BTW, was able to download (not synch) with the Fb app FriendsCSV THEN will synch with Plaxo (after the import into Outlook). Ya, a lot of steps, but has worked.

    One piece MISSING from the app though.. no e-mail address.

    The disruption continues… ;-)

  4. As a Plaxo user myself I can see the benefits of doing this. Facebook should bite the bullet and open up, after all as you say they are quite happy to harvest data in other systems. Maybe the other systems should shut Facebook out of the loop.

  5. mobasoft: in Facebook this is information is open to your friends. I’m thinking about data like what books you read, or what music you listen to, or who you are dating, etc.

  6. mobasoft: in Facebook this is information is open to your friends. I’m thinking about data like what books you read, or what music you listen to, or who you are dating, etc.

  7. “…harvest data in other systems.”

    So, that’s going to be the demise of Open Web

    Eventually, all the kids on the playground get into a fight -

  8. “…harvest data in other systems.”

    So, that’s going to be the demise of Open Web

    Eventually, all the kids on the playground get into a fight -

  9. One reason I have always been so insisting with Xing to be downloadable is exactly what you said – you want the data in the system you want, not where somebody else wants you. Which is why I was very happy that they did come back with an export contact data button.

    And if everything fails, you just pay somebody oversees to type it in manually, you will get your data.

    Because let’s face it: I always will have data which is not in the systems by personal effort plus not all data will be in those systems.

    Plaxo is the least of all evils at the moment for syncing (thought they did screw up most of my contacts and got rid of the mail address – hu?), and it allows me to take the data with me on my mobile phone.

    As long as facebook is not giving the data, we will just get it somewhere else, basta. Deal with it, or just go back to being insignificant for that usage.

    Will have a look at FriendsCSV now. :)

  10. Plaxo was literally going to run this service for me this morning — they told me how useful it [was] for you. Then I woke up to see today’s news.

    Not sure if I’m going to run it or not….

    I understand Facebook’s position, but I sure would like all my friends’ contact info in one place.

  11. Plaxo was literally going to run this service for me this morning — they told me how useful it [was] for you. Then I woke up to see today’s news.

    Not sure if I’m going to run it or not….

    I understand Facebook’s position, but I sure would like all my friends’ contact info in one place.

  12. One reason I have always been so insisting with Xing to be downloadable is exactly what you said – you want the data in the system you want, not where somebody else wants you. Which is why I was very happy that they did come back with an export contact data button.

    And if everything fails, you just pay somebody oversees to type it in manually, you will get your data.

    Because let’s face it: I always will have data which is not in the systems by personal effort plus not all data will be in those systems.

    Plaxo is the least of all evils at the moment for syncing (thought they did screw up most of my contacts and got rid of the mail address – hu?), and it allows me to take the data with me on my mobile phone.

    As long as facebook is not giving the data, we will just get it somewhere else, basta. Deal with it, or just go back to being insignificant for that usage.

    Will have a look at FriendsCSV now. :)

  13. addendum to my previous comment, it would also cause me to trust my data more on facebook, right now I only log in once a month or so often, I sign into Plaxo daily.

  14. addendum to my previous comment, it would also cause me to trust my data more on facebook, right now I only log in once a month or so often, I sign into Plaxo daily.

  15. 1. Plaxo’s on the block so what does this do for them?
    2. That’s FB’s get out of jail and get Scoble back in card. They can always say something like: “Oh well if that’s all you’re trying to do then that’s OK.”
    3. having nibbled at that one then it becomes a full assault on all your/my social graph data?

  16. 1. Plaxo’s on the block so what does this do for them?
    2. That’s FB’s get out of jail and get Scoble back in card. They can always say something like: “Oh well if that’s all you’re trying to do then that’s OK.”
    3. having nibbled at that one then it becomes a full assault on all your/my social graph data?

  17. BarbaraKB: that’s bullshit. Data gets scraped out of Facebook all the time by applications and other things.

    Also, why can Facebook import from GMail? Those users didn’t give permission for THEIR info to be taken off of Gmail.

  18. BarbaraKB: that’s bullshit. Data gets scraped out of Facebook all the time by applications and other things.

    Also, why can Facebook import from GMail? Those users didn’t give permission for THEIR info to be taken off of Gmail.

  19. Robert, do you think this is more about FaceBook being concerned about letting go of “their” data or more concerned about resource hogging from scripts and screen-scraping?

  20. Robert, do you think this is more about FaceBook being concerned about letting go of “their” data or more concerned about resource hogging from scripts and screen-scraping?

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  23. I have read all over the web on this issue that you seemed to have started, and it is funny that people say that the data isnt yours or you cant screen scrape it. How about this, you manually look at all the data and write it down on paper. Or enter it into excel. Or even better, you have 50 people do it for you, throughout the day, thats all they do is grab your data out for you. Is that against the TOS? Since you didnt use a “automated” script? Think about it that way, and I think that facebook needs to chill.. for the same arguments they had themselves about the newsfeed when they released it – “all the data is there already, you just need to look”, well , same if you want to take it with you in your head, excel, or wherever – just look :)

  24. I have read all over the web on this issue that you seemed to have started, and it is funny that people say that the data isnt yours or you cant screen scrape it. How about this, you manually look at all the data and write it down on paper. Or enter it into excel. Or even better, you have 50 people do it for you, throughout the day, thats all they do is grab your data out for you. Is that against the TOS? Since you didnt use a “automated” script? Think about it that way, and I think that facebook needs to chill.. for the same arguments they had themselves about the newsfeed when they released it – “all the data is there already, you just need to look”, well , same if you want to take it with you in your head, excel, or wherever – just look :)

  25. Don’t forget that not everyone likes or trusts Plaxo. While I like it personally, I’ve had people who’ve asked me to remove them from my address book on there, because they don’t want their data on those kinds of services.

    And no where in the user agreement for Facebook does it say you’re consenting to allowing you data to be automatically scraped and put into another service. With services which have long had APIs to let you access their data – Google and the like – this isn’t an issue.

    If Facebook turned around and said it was allowing third-party services to access my data on there, it would be extending the terms of service in exactly the same way that Google was criticised for doing with Reader. Personally, I wouldn’t mind – but other people might.

  26. Don’t forget that not everyone likes or trusts Plaxo. While I like it personally, I’ve had people who’ve asked me to remove them from my address book on there, because they don’t want their data on those kinds of services.

    And no where in the user agreement for Facebook does it say you’re consenting to allowing you data to be automatically scraped and put into another service. With services which have long had APIs to let you access their data – Google and the like – this isn’t an issue.

    If Facebook turned around and said it was allowing third-party services to access my data on there, it would be extending the terms of service in exactly the same way that Google was criticised for doing with Reader. Personally, I wouldn’t mind – but other people might.

  27. Hey All. I’m one of the developers behind FriendCSV, the first Facebook app that exported an individual’s full friend’s list. The app is still there and running fine and we had numerous talks with FB and there was not a single problem with that.

    So the thing is that whatever Plaxo Pulse was running (as a script) was actually unnecessary. There’s absolutely no need to run a script when you can just have a separate application that makes a call for all of your friends’ data. The “matching” with Plaxo contacts can then happen on Plaxo’s server, and sent to the individual. So in short it looks like Plaxo just didn’t realize that they could get these data w/o violating TOS.

    If they were actually going a step further and scraping pages and trying to do some OCR on the e-mail addresses, then it’s more of an issue.

    But right now, with FriendCSV, if you have a gmail account, we facilitate the exact same matching that Scoble was talking about, and thousands of people have used this app without problem.

  28. “How about this, you manually look at all the data and write it down on paper. ”

    Except that when you sign up to Facebook, you know that no one in the real world is actually going to do that for 4999 friends – so there’s a clear expectation that data isn’t going to scraped en masse.

  29. Hey All. I’m one of the developers behind FriendCSV, the first Facebook app that exported an individual’s full friend’s list. The app is still there and running fine and we had numerous talks with FB and there was not a single problem with that.

    So the thing is that whatever Plaxo Pulse was running (as a script) was actually unnecessary. There’s absolutely no need to run a script when you can just have a separate application that makes a call for all of your friends’ data. The “matching” with Plaxo contacts can then happen on Plaxo’s server, and sent to the individual. So in short it looks like Plaxo just didn’t realize that they could get these data w/o violating TOS.

    If they were actually going a step further and scraping pages and trying to do some OCR on the e-mail addresses, then it’s more of an issue.

    But right now, with FriendCSV, if you have a gmail account, we facilitate the exact same matching that Scoble was talking about, and thousands of people have used this app without problem.

  30. “How about this, you manually look at all the data and write it down on paper. ”

    Except that when you sign up to Facebook, you know that no one in the real world is actually going to do that for 4999 friends – so there’s a clear expectation that data isn’t going to scraped en masse.

  31. @Steve yeah – but look at it this way.

    People used to bitch because they had to enter each contact record one at a time – then they wanted automated tools so that they could point to their address books and save them the hassle of entering manually.

    Now, it’s come full circle, and because people decided that they now want to take their data someplace else, they are starting to complain again.

    face it – people are never going to be happy with anything that is available

  32. no one in the real world? if you really wanted the data you would do it, or use something like amazon’s mechanical turk, crowdsourcing…

  33. @Steve yeah – but look at it this way.

    People used to bitch because they had to enter each contact record one at a time – then they wanted automated tools so that they could point to their address books and save them the hassle of entering manually.

    Now, it’s come full circle, and because people decided that they now want to take their data someplace else, they are starting to complain again.

    face it – people are never going to be happy with anything that is available

  34. no one in the real world? if you really wanted the data you would do it, or use something like amazon’s mechanical turk, crowdsourcing…

  35. “[...] It’s ironic that you can import your Gmail address book into Facebook but you can’t export back out [...]”

    Well, actually you CAN, in fact you were doing it.
    Only, it is not ALLOWED by their TOS…

    as Nicole already commented: “[...] And if everything fails, you just pay somebody oversees to type it in manually, you will get your data [...]”

    In fact, I wonder how they are going to detect THAT.

    But it is always that way: when technology can’t really stop it, then TOS and policies and ultimately laywers get involved….

  36. “[...] It’s ironic that you can import your Gmail address book into Facebook but you can’t export back out [...]”

    Well, actually you CAN, in fact you were doing it.
    Only, it is not ALLOWED by their TOS…

    as Nicole already commented: “[...] And if everything fails, you just pay somebody oversees to type it in manually, you will get your data [...]”

    In fact, I wonder how they are going to detect THAT.

    But it is always that way: when technology can’t really stop it, then TOS and policies and ultimately laywers get involved….

  37. I believe email address on Facebook should be protected from other users, even friends. If easily and quickly retrievable, we’re back to massive spamming problem again.

    Personally I wouldnt want “friends” on facebook to easily save my data such as post/wall/address/phone number etc onto their hard disk…it just make things easier for stalkers..god know how many stalkers there are on campus already.

  38. There is a facebook app called friendsCSV that will auto export all your friends’ data to a csv file and will email it to you…I tried it out a few months back and the only thing it doesnt scrape is email addresses which is what I really wanted but there is something preventing it from doing so…

    maybe facebook will wake up and smell the fresh air of open-ness someday

  39. Rock On Scoble!!

    It’s the Users that Create the Value to these Social Networking Sites! Facebook isn’t Valued @ $15 Billion for the Crap Site it is thass fer darn sure*

    It’s the Eyeballs Stoopid!

    ;))

    I wouldn’t mind Running that Script on Flickr to not only get my 7,000 Contacts outta there but my 35,000 Photos + 40,000 Faves + 100,000 Comments + over 5 Million Views!!

    Cheers!! ;))

  40. There is a facebook app called friendsCSV that will auto export all your friends’ data to a csv file and will email it to you…I tried it out a few months back and the only thing it doesnt scrape is email addresses which is what I really wanted but there is something preventing it from doing so…

    maybe facebook will wake up and smell the fresh air of open-ness someday

  41. Rock On Scoble!!

    It’s the Users that Create the Value to these Social Networking Sites! Facebook isn’t Valued @ $15 Billion for the Crap Site it is thass fer darn sure*

    It’s the Eyeballs Stoopid!

    ;))

    I wouldn’t mind Running that Script on Flickr to not only get my 7,000 Contacts outta there but my 35,000 Photos + 40,000 Faves + 100,000 Comments + over 5 Million Views!!

    Cheers!! ;))

  42. I believe email address on Facebook should be protected from other users, even friends. If easily and quickly retrievable, we’re back to massive spamming problem again.

    Personally I wouldnt want “friends” on facebook to easily save my data such as post/wall/address/phone number etc onto their hard disk…it just make things easier for stalkers..god know how many stalkers there are on campus already.

  43. @Steve It’s not whether it’s possible that matters. Wait enough time, and anything’s possible. What matters is the expectation of the person who owns the data – which, let’s not forget, is NOT Robert but each of his friends. When they gave Robert access to their data, did they expect it to be taken wholesale and put into another service? That’s something which is against the ToS of Facebook and, therefore, they probably didn’t.

  44. @Steve It’s not whether it’s possible that matters. Wait enough time, and anything’s possible. What matters is the expectation of the person who owns the data – which, let’s not forget, is NOT Robert but each of his friends. When they gave Robert access to their data, did they expect it to be taken wholesale and put into another service? That’s something which is against the ToS of Facebook and, therefore, they probably didn’t.

  45. By exporting this data you’re removing individual Facebook users rights to retrospectively restrict access to such information. Facebook and other sites provide the controls to allow users to determine which information is visible by others. Once you’ve exported this information those users no longer have that level of control over their data and they’ve no idea what you might use it for.

    I’m all for there being a way for people to reuse their information with other sites but this seems to be driving that reuse from the wrong angle. Ideally Facebook would provide an export interface and only those who had given permission to export their data would appear in the output. In the absence of this though I’m not sure you’re right to scrape their pages anyway.

    As mentioned by others the data your harvesting is actually pretty sensitive. One could argue that people shouldn’t make this information public within their profile but people don’t always realise they’ve done this or realise the implications of doing so – particularly when they’re new to such a site.

  46. By exporting this data you’re removing individual Facebook users rights to retrospectively restrict access to such information. Facebook and other sites provide the controls to allow users to determine which information is visible by others. Once you’ve exported this information those users no longer have that level of control over their data and they’ve no idea what you might use it for.

    I’m all for there being a way for people to reuse their information with other sites but this seems to be driving that reuse from the wrong angle. Ideally Facebook would provide an export interface and only those who had given permission to export their data would appear in the output. In the absence of this though I’m not sure you’re right to scrape their pages anyway.

    As mentioned by others the data your harvesting is actually pretty sensitive. One could argue that people shouldn’t make this information public within their profile but people don’t always realise they’ve done this or realise the implications of doing so – particularly when they’re new to such a site.

  47. Actually we don’t think we were caught by the script itself. But we think another blogger sold me out. :-)

    And thereby hangs a tale. Shall I make popcorn?

    This has an interesting implication. It suggests that your Amish shunning at Facebook resulted not from hitting an automated tripwire — which seems more reasonable; computers multiply inefficiency as well as efficiency — but rather that your account was pulled by a HUMAN BEING.

    Which seems all kinds of inexplicably stupid.

    Hel-lo, he has maxed out the number of friends, lots of activity on his account, name “Scoble” seems vaguely familiar — don’t you think you’d maybe want to escalate that one up to Zuckerberg-level before pulling the plug?

    No?

    Someone at Facebook doesn’t understand the way social networks work In Real Life.

  48. Actually we don’t think we were caught by the script itself. But we think another blogger sold me out. :-)

    And thereby hangs a tale. Shall I make popcorn?

    This has an interesting implication. It suggests that your Amish shunning at Facebook resulted not from hitting an automated tripwire — which seems more reasonable; computers multiply inefficiency as well as efficiency — but rather that your account was pulled by a HUMAN BEING.

    Which seems all kinds of inexplicably stupid.

    Hel-lo, he has maxed out the number of friends, lots of activity on his account, name “Scoble” seems vaguely familiar — don’t you think you’d maybe want to escalate that one up to Zuckerberg-level before pulling the plug?

    No?

    Someone at Facebook doesn’t understand the way social networks work In Real Life.

  49. If Facebook made it easy for apps to extract my email address, home address and birthday wouldn’t that make it Heaven on Earth for identity thieves?

    There are people on my Facebook friend’s list I barely know who asked me to add them because they read my blog or are fans of software I’ve written. Should they now be able to extract my phone number, birthday, home address, email, education history, etc into “Random Web 2.0 Wannabe Social Network” because of this relationship? As a Facebook user, my answer is NO.

    More thoughts at http://www.25hoursaday.com/weblog/2008/01/03/FacebookRightScobleWrongSocialNetworkInteroperabilityAndTheOReillySocialGraphFOOCamp.aspx

  50. If Facebook made it easy for apps to extract my email address, home address and birthday wouldn’t that make it Heaven on Earth for identity thieves?

    There are people on my Facebook friend’s list I barely know who asked me to add them because they read my blog or are fans of software I’ve written. Should they now be able to extract my phone number, birthday, home address, email, education history, etc into “Random Web 2.0 Wannabe Social Network” because of this relationship? As a Facebook user, my answer is NO.

    More thoughts at http://www.25hoursaday.com/weblog/2008/01/03/FacebookRightScobleWrongSocialNetworkInteroperabilityAndTheOReillySocialGraphFOOCamp.aspx

  51. Scoble kicked out from Facebook

    Blogging celebrity Robert Scoble has been kicked out from Facebook today.Using his own words “I could call people idiots for not understanding the meaning of the…” Facebook terms of use, that disall…

  52. Plaxo sounds like something I might want to use on my teeth. Do 4 out of 5 dentists recommend?

    Scoble, what’s important, is that we will always be friends *in our hearts* whether you can’t fit me on Facebook because there’s a limit, or because Twitter is down, or because they booted you from Second Life, and *we’ll always have Kyte.TV*.

  53. Plaxo sounds like something I might want to use on my teeth. Do 4 out of 5 dentists recommend?

    Scoble, what’s important, is that we will always be friends *in our hearts* whether you can’t fit me on Facebook because there’s a limit, or because Twitter is down, or because they booted you from Second Life, and *we’ll always have Kyte.TV*.

  54. @Eric Eldon. Well that is just silly, then; there’s no reason they had to do any OCR to scrape e-mail addresses. Instead, they should have just exported the full list of names and birthdays, and then matched those against Scoble’s Plaxo list. The app could then easily flag duplicates or conflicts for the user to quickly review.

    But I’m glad someone tried it. FB has been allowing users to scrape App data for a LONG time, but someone definitely needed to make the OCR move to test the limits.

  55. @Eric Eldon. Well that is just silly, then; there’s no reason they had to do any OCR to scrape e-mail addresses. Instead, they should have just exported the full list of names and birthdays, and then matched those against Scoble’s Plaxo list. The app could then easily flag duplicates or conflicts for the user to quickly review.

    But I’m glad someone tried it. FB has been allowing users to scrape App data for a LONG time, but someone definitely needed to make the OCR move to test the limits.

  56. Once you’ve exported this information those users no longer have that level of control over their data and they’ve no idea what you might use it for.

    First off, this is like saying that once you’ve given your girlfriend your phone number, you have no way of taking it back once you break up. She still knows your number! You can’t, like, force her to get amnesia or have a lobotomy! O the horror!

    Presumably if you hand out information to people you trust, you trust them enough to not misuse the information later? Or should Facebook stop referring to your contacts as “friends,” and instead call them “random strangers who might abuse the information I give them at some point in the future?”

    Second, it’s not like you can’t accomplish the same thing BY HAND, reading all the information off the web page and typing it into Outlook. You are still able to “export information” out of Facebook; it’s just not especially feasible to do it that way for 5,000 “friends.” If you have 10 friends, there’s nothing stopping you. In effect, Facebook is penalizing you for being a bigger user/having a larger network.

  57. Once you’ve exported this information those users no longer have that level of control over their data and they’ve no idea what you might use it for.

    First off, this is like saying that once you’ve given your girlfriend your phone number, you have no way of taking it back once you break up. She still knows your number! You can’t, like, force her to get amnesia or have a lobotomy! O the horror!

    Presumably if you hand out information to people you trust, you trust them enough to not misuse the information later? Or should Facebook stop referring to your contacts as “friends,” and instead call them “random strangers who might abuse the information I give them at some point in the future?”

    Second, it’s not like you can’t accomplish the same thing BY HAND, reading all the information off the web page and typing it into Outlook. You are still able to “export information” out of Facebook; it’s just not especially feasible to do it that way for 5,000 “friends.” If you have 10 friends, there’s nothing stopping you. In effect, Facebook is penalizing you for being a bigger user/having a larger network.

  58. Karim – No you can’t expect her to forget it but I think you can reasonably expect that she won’t publish it publically elsewhere for other people you don’t know to see it. Also once that information is published elsewhere you no longer have the ability to restrict it’s access to only those friends that have seen it to date.

    I think Dare’s comment (and blog post) sums up my thoughts much more accurately.

    Data can always be extracted by hand but it’s obviously somewhat more time consuming and discourages mass abuse of data.

  59. Karim – No you can’t expect her to forget it but I think you can reasonably expect that she won’t publish it publically elsewhere for other people you don’t know to see it. Also once that information is published elsewhere you no longer have the ability to restrict it’s access to only those friends that have seen it to date.

    I think Dare’s comment (and blog post) sums up my thoughts much more accurately.

    Data can always be extracted by hand but it’s obviously somewhat more time consuming and discourages mass abuse of data.

  60. Presumably if you hand out information to people you trust, you trust them enough to not misuse the information later?

    You’d think but isn’t that exactly what Scoble is doing? I’m sure some of the people in his friends list didn’t imagine he’d do this with their data.

  61. Presumably if you hand out information to people you trust, you trust them enough to not misuse the information later?

    You’d think but isn’t that exactly what Scoble is doing? I’m sure some of the people in his friends list didn’t imagine he’d do this with their data.

  62. Scoble breaks Facebook TOS in Robin Hood data portability effort

    I like Robert Scoble’s most recent fight with Facebook over data portability that led to his account being disabled but don’t like how he went about starting it.

    Scraping without permission is wrong. Sorry, yes, even scraping your own da…

  63. Should they now be able to extract my phone number, birthday, home address, email, education history, etc into “Random Web 2.0 Wannabe Social Network” because of this relationship? As a Facebook user, my answer is NO.

    Well, they can already do this NOW. They just have to do it “by hand” instead of using a script.

    It isn’t a question of whether it’s possible to extract this information out of Facebook, so much as whether you can AUTOMATE the extraction.

    Facebook has made extracting the information artificially inefficient. It’s a kind of “regressive tax,” if you will: the more friends you have, the more you use Facebook, the more onerous the task of extracting the information.

    Namaste. Peace out. Free Scoble’s Data. ;-)

  64. Should they now be able to extract my phone number, birthday, home address, email, education history, etc into “Random Web 2.0 Wannabe Social Network” because of this relationship? As a Facebook user, my answer is NO.

    Well, they can already do this NOW. They just have to do it “by hand” instead of using a script.

    It isn’t a question of whether it’s possible to extract this information out of Facebook, so much as whether you can AUTOMATE the extraction.

    Facebook has made extracting the information artificially inefficient. It’s a kind of “regressive tax,” if you will: the more friends you have, the more you use Facebook, the more onerous the task of extracting the information.

    Namaste. Peace out. Free Scoble’s Data. ;-)

  65. Imagine they join open Id and some other company comes along, clones Facebook, and they offer you 10 bucks. What would you do?
    I bet a huge portion of Facebook’s members would take the 10 bucks, move to another network, buy some songs on iTunes with the money and never look back!

    That’s what venture capital will be used for.
    $ 10 million gives you 1 million members in maybe as little as 30 days!
    And let’s say every member has 20 friends.
    = 21 million members
    Cost of one member: $ 0.48

    Those members log in let’s say 50 times a year and they look at 2 pages.
    That’s over 2 billion page views!
    CPM : $ 15
    That’s 30 million a year!

    And when you don’t care about the profits in your first year on the market, well then, offer those 1 million members $ 30 !

    Perhaps it’s not that easy but I’m sure you get the picture of where this might end up going for Facebook.

  66. Imagine they join open Id and some other company comes along, clones Facebook, and they offer you 10 bucks. What would you do?
    I bet a huge portion of Facebook’s members would take the 10 bucks, move to another network, buy some songs on iTunes with the money and never look back!

    That’s what venture capital will be used for.
    $ 10 million gives you 1 million members in maybe as little as 30 days!
    And let’s say every member has 20 friends.
    = 21 million members
    Cost of one member: $ 0.48

    Those members log in let’s say 50 times a year and they look at 2 pages.
    That’s over 2 billion page views!
    CPM : $ 15
    That’s 30 million a year!

    And when you don’t care about the profits in your first year on the market, well then, offer those 1 million members $ 30 !

    Perhaps it’s not that easy but I’m sure you get the picture of where this might end up going for Facebook.

  67. OK, new term:

    ** Scobleicious **

    The press and attention Plaxo and Scoble are getting from his being Scobled (waxed, vaporized, disabled abruptly and without warning) is * scoble-icious!! *
    :-)

  68. OK, new term:

    ** Scobleicious **

    The press and attention Plaxo and Scoble are getting from his being Scobled (waxed, vaporized, disabled abruptly and without warning) is * scoble-icious!! *
    :-)

  69. I dont appreciate you scraping my email address and handing it to plaxo Robert. They spanned a previous address of mine to high hell

  70. I dont appreciate you scraping my email address and handing it to plaxo Robert. They spanned a previous address of mine to high hell

  71. Plaxo ‘used’ Robert.
    He probably didn’t mind because it could benefit him (and it did – lots of traffic to his site), but what if FB takes this to court?
    Don’t get me wrong, I applaud what he did, but at the very least Plaxo should take up the responsibility and pay Robert’s bills in case it goes wrong.
    I bet they didn’t make him any promises whatsoever.

    All this is bad publicity for Facebook, and it would get worse if they took it one step further, but the way I see it this ain’t good news for Plaxo.
    They support open ID which is good, but in a way they used Robert.
    Now I know this ain’t unusual in the corporate world, but if that’s what they stand for then I guess it’s time for some good alternatives!

  72. Plaxo ‘used’ Robert.
    He probably didn’t mind because it could benefit him (and it did – lots of traffic to his site), but what if FB takes this to court?
    Don’t get me wrong, I applaud what he did, but at the very least Plaxo should take up the responsibility and pay Robert’s bills in case it goes wrong.
    I bet they didn’t make him any promises whatsoever.

    All this is bad publicity for Facebook, and it would get worse if they took it one step further, but the way I see it this ain’t good news for Plaxo.
    They support open ID which is good, but in a way they used Robert.
    Now I know this ain’t unusual in the corporate world, but if that’s what they stand for then I guess it’s time for some good alternatives!

  73. Last week, I used a different company’s beta Facebook scraper. It worked and didn’t get me booted off the site — but I don’t have a very long list of friends on Facebook, so it probably just didn’t do enough requests to set off the scraper alarm.

  74. Last week, I used a different company’s beta Facebook scraper. It worked and didn’t get me booted off the site — but I don’t have a very long list of friends on Facebook, so it probably just didn’t do enough requests to set off the scraper alarm.

  75. Also, why can Facebook import from GMail? Those users didn’t give permission for THEIR info to be taken off of Gmail.

    How do you figure? When they (foolishly) give FB their Gmail password, they are giving FB permission to take their Gmail info.

  76. This is SO BAD, that i’m almost considering dumping facebook. The gall that they have to think that they are some kind of utility. The gall they have not to play fairly on an open field…
    It’s bullshit to think that because I’m doing a thing one way instead of the other (oh, this HTTP GET is somehow different from the other HTTP GET) that I’m having some kind of adverse effect on the servers.
    The fact that someone is my friend IS MY INFORMATION, just like the fact that I have someone in my gmail address book is a fact. I want to exploit these facts to my benefit in as open a way as possible. This means that i want to share this information with the other tools that I use.

    Does anyone really care HOW I ACCOMPLISH THIS?

    Facebook certainly was not able to detect Robert’s use of this technology, unless his script presented itself with a new USER_AGENT, geekdave wonders if the USER_AGENT of the script was other than Mozilla (ie).

    Even given that, I’d love to see the log analysis system that they have. I bet they wouldn’t even detect the 1800 requests that were made from plaxo on behalf of Robert…

    Scoble, I hope that FB bucks up, and gives you your contact information, and as much history as possible. I hope you then ditch facebook – I’ll follow and go somewhere that’s a bit more open and permissive.

    Thanks, and best of luck.

    @geekdave

  77. Also, why can Facebook import from GMail? Those users didn’t give permission for THEIR info to be taken off of Gmail.

    How do you figure? When they (foolishly) give FB their Gmail password, they are giving FB permission to take their Gmail info.

  78. This is SO BAD, that i’m almost considering dumping facebook. The gall that they have to think that they are some kind of utility. The gall they have not to play fairly on an open field…
    It’s bullshit to think that because I’m doing a thing one way instead of the other (oh, this HTTP GET is somehow different from the other HTTP GET) that I’m having some kind of adverse effect on the servers.
    The fact that someone is my friend IS MY INFORMATION, just like the fact that I have someone in my gmail address book is a fact. I want to exploit these facts to my benefit in as open a way as possible. This means that i want to share this information with the other tools that I use.

    Does anyone really care HOW I ACCOMPLISH THIS?

    Facebook certainly was not able to detect Robert’s use of this technology, unless his script presented itself with a new USER_AGENT, geekdave wonders if the USER_AGENT of the script was other than Mozilla (ie).

    Even given that, I’d love to see the log analysis system that they have. I bet they wouldn’t even detect the 1800 requests that were made from plaxo on behalf of Robert…

    Scoble, I hope that FB bucks up, and gives you your contact information, and as much history as possible. I hope you then ditch facebook – I’ll follow and go somewhere that’s a bit more open and permissive.

    Thanks, and best of luck.

    @geekdave

  79. This is probably where Facebook will start to run into issues. Checking the Plaxo site, they now can pull from MySpace, Windows Live Spaces, LiveJournal, etc. If they don’t correct their limitations and watch what their doing, they’ll continue to lose “customers”.

  80. This is probably where Facebook will start to run into issues. Checking the Plaxo site, they now can pull from MySpace, Windows Live Spaces, LiveJournal, etc. If they don’t correct their limitations and watch what their doing, they’ll continue to lose “customers”.

  81. I support the campaign to get him his facebook account back however I have to wonder why he chose his live account to use to test out some new software?

    perhaps a test account set up purely for that purpose or if they wanted to stress test it with larger numbers of members i’m certain that via his many friends etc he could have created a new profile just for that purpose ;-)

    He also reviewed the T&C’s before and noted that scripts weren’t allowed yet chose to carry on. He was playing with fire to start with.

    Get him his account back but be more careful next time ;-)

    In instances like this a “sorry” probably wouldn’t go amiss in appeasing the facebook owners. nothing wrong with being humble especially as he did run a script which is not allowed

    testing on a live account and with live data…..

  82. I support the campaign to get him his facebook account back however I have to wonder why he chose his live account to use to test out some new software?

    perhaps a test account set up purely for that purpose or if they wanted to stress test it with larger numbers of members i’m certain that via his many friends etc he could have created a new profile just for that purpose ;-)

    He also reviewed the T&C’s before and noted that scripts weren’t allowed yet chose to carry on. He was playing with fire to start with.

    Get him his account back but be more careful next time ;-)

    In instances like this a “sorry” probably wouldn’t go amiss in appeasing the facebook owners. nothing wrong with being humble especially as he did run a script which is not allowed

    testing on a live account and with live data…..

  83. I love the whole controvesy over people taking names, email addresses and dates of birth.

    My Name and my DOB is registered with the local Birth, Deaths and Marriages Registrar and is available to anyone researching their genealogy.

    My Email address is usually everywhere somehow and the ones that are really private have never been posted in public. ( its not that hard really )

    Want to know where I have worked or where I might work? You can Google my name.

    I got elected as a Parish Councillor. As part of that process I had to register my interests. In fact we expect public officials to make all their “interests” and financial dealings available to public scrutiny. It will be out there long after I leave my office.

    But heres the real point. If this aggregation leads to a de – duplication of records in plaxo and facebook and a correction to current data then count me IN.

  84. I love the whole controvesy over people taking names, email addresses and dates of birth.

    My Name and my DOB is registered with the local Birth, Deaths and Marriages Registrar and is available to anyone researching their genealogy.

    My Email address is usually everywhere somehow and the ones that are really private have never been posted in public. ( its not that hard really )

    Want to know where I have worked or where I might work? You can Google my name.

    I got elected as a Parish Councillor. As part of that process I had to register my interests. In fact we expect public officials to make all their “interests” and financial dealings available to public scrutiny. It will be out there long after I leave my office.

    But heres the real point. If this aggregation leads to a de – duplication of records in plaxo and facebook and a correction to current data then count me IN.

  85. Robert,

    I am (was?) one of your “Facebook Friends.” (Though, if you have 5,000 of them, it’s stretching the definition of “friendship” into “mild acquaintanceship.)

    I am, therefore, given you permission to use MY data (not yours, MINE) on the Facebook site.

    Personally, I’m not fussed whether you want to store it on the Facebook server, or on Plaxo Pulse, or for that matter chiseled into a brick on your house (along with 4,999 other bricks) as a piece of “installation art.” [1]

    That having been said, I can understand how some Facebook users might be happier in a walled garden, and therefore UNHAPPY that THEIR data got scraped out.

    Mark in West Sussex, England [2]

    [1] If you do this, and win a major art award, I want an invite to the prize ceremony :-)

    [2] I think my location IS significant. We have a very different “social norm” of privacy information in Europe compared to the US. Many things that are common in the US would be criminal offences in the UK!

  86. Robert,

    I am (was?) one of your “Facebook Friends.” (Though, if you have 5,000 of them, it’s stretching the definition of “friendship” into “mild acquaintanceship.)

    I am, therefore, given you permission to use MY data (not yours, MINE) on the Facebook site.

    Personally, I’m not fussed whether you want to store it on the Facebook server, or on Plaxo Pulse, or for that matter chiseled into a brick on your house (along with 4,999 other bricks) as a piece of “installation art.” [1]

    That having been said, I can understand how some Facebook users might be happier in a walled garden, and therefore UNHAPPY that THEIR data got scraped out.

    Mark in West Sussex, England [2]

    [1] If you do this, and win a major art award, I want an invite to the prize ceremony :-)

    [2] I think my location IS significant. We have a very different “social norm” of privacy information in Europe compared to the US. Many things that are common in the US would be criminal offences in the UK!

  87. No you can’t expect her to forget it but I think you can reasonably expect that she won’t publish it publically elsewhere for other people you don’t know to see it.

    Had many girlfriends, Ed?

    I kid, I kid! :-)

    Also once that information is published elsewhere you no longer have the ability to restrict it’s access to only those friends that have seen it to date.

    I guess I’m just puzzling over why Facebook should work any different than Real Life? You give your business card to someone, guess what, you “no longer have the ability to restrict” that information. It’s gone. Free, as in buh-bye. You can’t turn around later and ask for the business card back. You don’t want someone to have the information, you don’t trust them? Then don’t give them your card, don’t make them your friend.

    You want to give your card to someone you don’t trust? Then don’t put any non-public information on your card. Leave off your birthday, SSN, Visa card number and underwear size.

    People seem to be treating Facebook as some kind of system where 5,000 people can know your birthday one day, but if you change your mind later, you can “revoke” the information and make those 5,000 people forget when you were born. Alas, the toothpaste does NOT go back in the tube. Facebook is a bag what formerly held a cat.

    You’d think but isn’t that exactly what Scoble is doing? I’m sure some of the people in his friends list didn’t imagine he’d do this with their data.

    Do what, exactly? Make a copy of it?

    “OMG I gave someone my phone number and they had the nerve to make a copy of it! Yeah! They actually wrote it down in TWO places! They typed it into Outlook AND wrote it down on a Post-It Note! Yeah! And the Post-It Note didn’t even have a password!”

    I don’t know what Scoble is doing with his Facebook data, but presumably if I trusted him enough to give him my information, I trust him enough to not do something completely EVIL with it?

  88. No you can’t expect her to forget it but I think you can reasonably expect that she won’t publish it publically elsewhere for other people you don’t know to see it.

    Had many girlfriends, Ed?

    I kid, I kid! :-)

    Also once that information is published elsewhere you no longer have the ability to restrict it’s access to only those friends that have seen it to date.

    I guess I’m just puzzling over why Facebook should work any different than Real Life? You give your business card to someone, guess what, you “no longer have the ability to restrict” that information. It’s gone. Free, as in buh-bye. You can’t turn around later and ask for the business card back. You don’t want someone to have the information, you don’t trust them? Then don’t give them your card, don’t make them your friend.

    You want to give your card to someone you don’t trust? Then don’t put any non-public information on your card. Leave off your birthday, SSN, Visa card number and underwear size.

    People seem to be treating Facebook as some kind of system where 5,000 people can know your birthday one day, but if you change your mind later, you can “revoke” the information and make those 5,000 people forget when you were born. Alas, the toothpaste does NOT go back in the tube. Facebook is a bag what formerly held a cat.

    You’d think but isn’t that exactly what Scoble is doing? I’m sure some of the people in his friends list didn’t imagine he’d do this with their data.

    Do what, exactly? Make a copy of it?

    “OMG I gave someone my phone number and they had the nerve to make a copy of it! Yeah! They actually wrote it down in TWO places! They typed it into Outlook AND wrote it down on a Post-It Note! Yeah! And the Post-It Note didn’t even have a password!”

    I don’t know what Scoble is doing with his Facebook data, but presumably if I trusted him enough to give him my information, I trust him enough to not do something completely EVIL with it?

  89. Doesn’t it make sense that there’s a foul play in there? with Plaxo guys expecting facebook to act against that, and take advantage of the angry mob “blogosphere” expected reaction to bitch-slap facebook around for reasons of un-openness.

  90. Doesn’t it make sense that there’s a foul play in there? with Plaxo guys expecting facebook to act against that, and take advantage of the angry mob “blogosphere” expected reaction to bitch-slap facebook around for reasons of un-openness.

  91. @Ed Eliot -

    “Karim – No you can’t expect her to forget it but I think you can reasonably expect that she won’t publish it publically elsewhere for other people you don’t know to see it.”

    You obviously aren’t familiar with the endless supply of “Pics of My Ex-Gf” porn sites around. :) Obviously, your “reasonable” expectation just doesn’t hold water in reality (especially when talking about the demographic using FB and MySpace).

    The short answer is this – users publishing sensitive information on social networks are still naive to think that their information is somehow “protected”. The reality is that once it is published even in a limited public form one must assume that it can be leaked to those who you do not want to have this information. Users will greatly benefit from changing their thinking about what information they should readily make available to “friends”.

  92. @Ed Eliot -

    “Karim – No you can’t expect her to forget it but I think you can reasonably expect that she won’t publish it publically elsewhere for other people you don’t know to see it.”

    You obviously aren’t familiar with the endless supply of “Pics of My Ex-Gf” porn sites around. :) Obviously, your “reasonable” expectation just doesn’t hold water in reality (especially when talking about the demographic using FB and MySpace).

    The short answer is this – users publishing sensitive information on social networks are still naive to think that their information is somehow “protected”. The reality is that once it is published even in a limited public form one must assume that it can be leaked to those who you do not want to have this information. Users will greatly benefit from changing their thinking about what information they should readily make available to “friends”.

  93. “Plaxo WAS using OCR to scrape these email addresses.”

    Times 5000? I would have kicked your butt off, too.

    Next time use one of the applications that seem to know how to do this right.

    This isn’t a facebook issue. This was about the application you used. But it sure got you in Techmeme, didn’t it?

  94. “Plaxo WAS using OCR to scrape these email addresses.”

    Times 5000? I would have kicked your butt off, too.

    Next time use one of the applications that seem to know how to do this right.

    This isn’t a facebook issue. This was about the application you used. But it sure got you in Techmeme, didn’t it?

  95. Not related to Facebook, but to Plaxo. I was surprised a couple of weeks ago to see Plaxo reminding me of the birthday of a former co-worker. This person was not, and probably never will be, a Plaxo user, but her birthday was harvested when I ran Plaxo against my Outlook contacts.

    This got me to wondering what Plaxo would do with all of the information it harvests.

    I haven’t investigated Plaxo much, but does it let you get your information out of Plaxo? And what else does Plaxo do with the information?

    These information ownership issues are getting VERY interesting.

  96. Not related to Facebook, but to Plaxo. I was surprised a couple of weeks ago to see Plaxo reminding me of the birthday of a former co-worker. This person was not, and probably never will be, a Plaxo user, but her birthday was harvested when I ran Plaxo against my Outlook contacts.

    This got me to wondering what Plaxo would do with all of the information it harvests.

    I haven’t investigated Plaxo much, but does it let you get your information out of Plaxo? And what else does Plaxo do with the information?

    These information ownership issues are getting VERY interesting.

  97. Had many girlfriends, Ed?

    No, but I’ve been happily married for a few years now. I’m hoping my wife won’t plaster my email addresses and telephone numbers everywhere. ;-)

    I see your points Karim but I think the issue isn’t about whether or not your data will get distributed minimally (in manual form) by some users but that making it easy to bulk extract data makes it more likely it’ll be abused.

    I think in Scoble’s case it’s the fact that he bulk uploaded it to another service and I doubt that’s something many would be happy with. They might be happy with Scoble’s individual use of their data but can he ensure that Plaxo won’t abuse that data.

  98. Had many girlfriends, Ed?

    No, but I’ve been happily married for a few years now. I’m hoping my wife won’t plaster my email addresses and telephone numbers everywhere. ;-)

    I see your points Karim but I think the issue isn’t about whether or not your data will get distributed minimally (in manual form) by some users but that making it easy to bulk extract data makes it more likely it’ll be abused.

    I think in Scoble’s case it’s the fact that he bulk uploaded it to another service and I doubt that’s something many would be happy with. They might be happy with Scoble’s individual use of their data but can he ensure that Plaxo won’t abuse that data.

  99. I don’t mind if Scoble/Plaxo/the Internet scrapes my name and birthdate since I put it there and that’s the part that’s always viewable by the public. People can opt not to put in a birthdate easily.

    There is a thingie you check off not to have Facebook Googleized though, and I wonder at what point that thing kicks in.

    But all the other stuff of Facebook, the guts of Facebook, like the vampire bites, the videos, the graffiti on the walls, the books reviewed — that shouldn’t be able to be ported out because it’s content that the author makes.

    The copyright of a letter belongs to the author. Isn’t it kind of like a letter?

    So are we saying here that it’s ok to individually upload and download stuff but not in batches of 5,000? Well, Scoble isn’t going to spam people with Viagra ads in their various social media services but you can’t expect everyone who tries to port that many names to be as scrupulous.

  100. I don’t mind if Scoble/Plaxo/the Internet scrapes my name and birthdate since I put it there and that’s the part that’s always viewable by the public. People can opt not to put in a birthdate easily.

    There is a thingie you check off not to have Facebook Googleized though, and I wonder at what point that thing kicks in.

    But all the other stuff of Facebook, the guts of Facebook, like the vampire bites, the videos, the graffiti on the walls, the books reviewed — that shouldn’t be able to be ported out because it’s content that the author makes.

    The copyright of a letter belongs to the author. Isn’t it kind of like a letter?

    So are we saying here that it’s ok to individually upload and download stuff but not in batches of 5,000? Well, Scoble isn’t going to spam people with Viagra ads in their various social media services but you can’t expect everyone who tries to port that many names to be as scrupulous.

  101. From my perspective, it took me long enough to accept “friends” requests in facebook from people who aren’t really “friends”, if you catch what I mean. I used linkedin for profession contacts, and facebook for friends from high school/college/”my 20s”.

    I still ignore Plaxo requests that come to me via email (I never got over their initial launch tactics), so having the information about myself that I entered into Facebook never making it’s way into Plaxo is an important Facebook feature.

  102. From my perspective, it took me long enough to accept “friends” requests in facebook from people who aren’t really “friends”, if you catch what I mean. I used linkedin for profession contacts, and facebook for friends from high school/college/”my 20s”.

    I still ignore Plaxo requests that come to me via email (I never got over their initial launch tactics), so having the information about myself that I entered into Facebook never making it’s way into Plaxo is an important Facebook feature.

  103. Guess Facebook isn’t such a great “Rolodex” after all. Say what you want about the monkeys in Redmond but that Outlook Address Book seems pretty “open” now, doesn’t it?

  104. Guess Facebook isn’t such a great “Rolodex” after all. Say what you want about the monkeys in Redmond but that Outlook Address Book seems pretty “open” now, doesn’t it?

  105. So technically you were violating facebook’s draconian, non-social terms of use by scraping data from their servers.

    Sure, the faceborg might give you your account back but how is that fair to others who had accounts shut down for legitimate scraping?

  106. So technically you were violating facebook’s draconian, non-social terms of use by scraping data from their servers.

    Sure, the faceborg might give you your account back but how is that fair to others who had accounts shut down for legitimate scraping?

  107. Before people talk about, whether its facebook’s duty to protect user info or the user’s right to choose what is private, they need to understand how easy it is today to scrap a site.

    I am not even talking about dapper.net (for the non programmer). All you have to do is watch the java and python mailing lists and irc channels to get a sense of the level of scraping going on. Its getting ridiculously easy to write complex scrap(p?)ers.

    There is no such thing as private data on the internet…ask Bush if you don’t believe me.

  108. Before people talk about, whether its facebook’s duty to protect user info or the user’s right to choose what is private, they need to understand how easy it is today to scrap a site.

    I am not even talking about dapper.net (for the non programmer). All you have to do is watch the java and python mailing lists and irc channels to get a sense of the level of scraping going on. Its getting ridiculously easy to write complex scrap(p?)ers.

    There is no such thing as private data on the internet…ask Bush if you don’t believe me.

  109. Times 5000? I would have kicked your butt off, too.

    Um, ’cause 5,000 is a really big number to a computer? Facebook’s TOS says users must not use the site in a way that could “damage, disable, overburden or impair the Site,” but they don’t tell you precisely what volume of HTTP GET requests over what period of time will cause the Turbo 386 under Zuckerberg’s desk to burst into flames.

    Instead of figuring out how to throttle excessive requests on their end, they’d rather tell their users they’re not allowed to make “too many” requests — whatever that is.

    So are we saying here that it’s ok to individually upload and download stuff but not in batches of 5,000?

    Apparently! There is a mysterious line, somewhere between viewing ONE page and viewing 5,000 pages that, once stepped over, results in your becoming a Facebook Unperson.

  110. Times 5000? I would have kicked your butt off, too.

    Um, ’cause 5,000 is a really big number to a computer? Facebook’s TOS says users must not use the site in a way that could “damage, disable, overburden or impair the Site,” but they don’t tell you precisely what volume of HTTP GET requests over what period of time will cause the Turbo 386 under Zuckerberg’s desk to burst into flames.

    Instead of figuring out how to throttle excessive requests on their end, they’d rather tell their users they’re not allowed to make “too many” requests — whatever that is.

    So are we saying here that it’s ok to individually upload and download stuff but not in batches of 5,000?

    Apparently! There is a mysterious line, somewhere between viewing ONE page and viewing 5,000 pages that, once stepped over, results in your becoming a Facebook Unperson.

  111. The Scoble Curse remains rock solid, amazingly so…talks up Facebook, then Beacon and then Plaxo ScrapeGate. Talks up Apple, then Leopardgate and broken MacBookgate. Talks up Longhorn then delayed Vistagate. Talks up Seagate then Free Agentgate. Talks up Xbox 360, then billion-dollar recall-gate. Talks up Tablets SPOT, UMPC-Origami, and then zilchgate. Talks up HD-DVD, and then scandalgate. Talks up Second Life, and wastelandgate. Talks up Kindle, and kindle firewoodgate.

    If I was a Marketer, based on the historical track record, once the belly-laugh Scoble comes at you with the shaky cams, offering free media coverage, don’t bite, as it’s not ‘free’, not in any sense of the word, it will cost you dearly in terms of the ‘curse’.

    A few points…

    1. Your DATA? Who made it YOURS? If I become a “friend” that gives anyone (Plaxo/Scoble/Spammers) the right to cull my data? I think not. Facebook is right.

    2. If you want a controllable PIM, use Outlook or ilk. Not some privacy-invading advertiser network, oh sorry “social software”, that slaps a TOS on every move. Reap what sow.

    3. Plaxo doesn’t exactly have a good rep. here, having spammed me to death with ‘update’ requests in the past. Why should they need to match my Name, Email and Birthday with Facebook data anyways? Even if people have both accounts, maybe they don’t want to be compatibility matched.

    I hereby dub this Plaxo Scrapegate.

  112. The Scoble Curse remains rock solid, amazingly so…talks up Facebook, then Beacon and then Plaxo ScrapeGate. Talks up Apple, then Leopardgate and broken MacBookgate. Talks up Longhorn then delayed Vistagate. Talks up Seagate then Free Agentgate. Talks up Xbox 360, then billion-dollar recall-gate. Talks up Tablets SPOT, UMPC-Origami, and then zilchgate. Talks up HD-DVD, and then scandalgate. Talks up Second Life, and wastelandgate. Talks up Kindle, and kindle firewoodgate.

    If I was a Marketer, based on the historical track record, once the belly-laugh Scoble comes at you with the shaky cams, offering free media coverage, don’t bite, as it’s not ‘free’, not in any sense of the word, it will cost you dearly in terms of the ‘curse’.

    A few points…

    1. Your DATA? Who made it YOURS? If I become a “friend” that gives anyone (Plaxo/Scoble/Spammers) the right to cull my data? I think not. Facebook is right.

    2. If you want a controllable PIM, use Outlook or ilk. Not some privacy-invading advertiser network, oh sorry “social software”, that slaps a TOS on every move. Reap what sow.

    3. Plaxo doesn’t exactly have a good rep. here, having spammed me to death with ‘update’ requests in the past. Why should they need to match my Name, Email and Birthday with Facebook data anyways? Even if people have both accounts, maybe they don’t want to be compatibility matched.

    I hereby dub this Plaxo Scrapegate.

  113. That’s great. You’ll get a virtually unused email address and a birthday showing me to be about 95 years old. My real friends know how to get ahold of me and when my birthday is. My facebook friends don’t need to know that.

  114. That’s great. You’ll get a virtually unused email address and a birthday showing me to be about 95 years old. My real friends know how to get ahold of me and when my birthday is. My facebook friends don’t need to know that.

  115. It appears Facebook is scared of Plaxo (and any other similar network). If all the information is transferable between networks, then there is nothing locking users in to their network. They should concentrate on improving their product so that people don’t want to leave Facebook, rather than trying to corral people into a closed network. This is very similar to the way cellular providers fought local number portability. Competition is good for the consumer and good for innovation, but it’s bad for lazy companies that are resting on their reputations.

    If users are that concerned about privacy, they should not join any social networks. Once your info is out there, it’s like trying to get your pee out of a pool…

  116. It appears Facebook is scared of Plaxo (and any other similar network). If all the information is transferable between networks, then there is nothing locking users in to their network. They should concentrate on improving their product so that people don’t want to leave Facebook, rather than trying to corral people into a closed network. This is very similar to the way cellular providers fought local number portability. Competition is good for the consumer and good for innovation, but it’s bad for lazy companies that are resting on their reputations.

    If users are that concerned about privacy, they should not join any social networks. Once your info is out there, it’s like trying to get your pee out of a pool…

  117. I love your blog but am sick to death reading about facebook – it may be the 2nd coming of christ per your books – but pls move on or atleast report other things :)

  118. I love your blog but am sick to death reading about facebook – it may be the 2nd coming of christ per your books – but pls move on or atleast report other things :)

  119. As one of the “Scoble 5000″ I would contend that my birthday is mine, not Scoble’s. I object to my birthday being handed over to Plaxo, which I well remember as every goon I met seemed to spam with some request associated with Plaxo. I’ve heard they’ve changed, but Plaxo would take a long time to gain my trust. I trust my friends not to hand my email over to spammers. I think Scoble crossed line.

  120. As one of the “Scoble 5000″ I would contend that my birthday is mine, not Scoble’s. I object to my birthday being handed over to Plaxo, which I well remember as every goon I met seemed to spam with some request associated with Plaxo. I’ve heard they’ve changed, but Plaxo would take a long time to gain my trust. I trust my friends not to hand my email over to spammers. I think Scoble crossed line.

  121. Perhaps this explains why Facebook aren’t yet using microformats; particularly hCard?

    (hCard: http://microformats.org/wiki/hcard)

    After all, if you can move your friends’ addresses elsewhere, how are FB going to make money putting adverts in front of you?

    [Aside: My Facebook profile has my DoB, mobile number and home address; I only add people as friends on FB if I'd be willing to give them that data in real life.]

  122. Perhaps this explains why Facebook aren’t yet using microformats; particularly hCard?

    (hCard: http://microformats.org/wiki/hcard)

    After all, if you can move your friends’ addresses elsewhere, how are FB going to make money putting adverts in front of you?

    [Aside: My Facebook profile has my DoB, mobile number and home address; I only add people as friends on FB if I'd be willing to give them that data in real life.]

  123. Here’s what we learned kids:

    Scoble scraping = good.

    Beacon scraping = bad.

    Why is it that the privacy people who crowed about Beacon aren’t furious at Scoble?

    If it wasn’t that big of deal to take this, why not do an opt-in? How do I know Scoble won’t lose my data? Sell it? lose it to someone who will sell it?

  124. Here’s what we learned kids:

    Scoble scraping = good.

    Beacon scraping = bad.

    Why is it that the privacy people who crowed about Beacon aren’t furious at Scoble?

    If it wasn’t that big of deal to take this, why not do an opt-in? How do I know Scoble won’t lose my data? Sell it? lose it to someone who will sell it?

  125. Every identity theft warning about Facebook includes hiding your birthday either completely or making it friends only. Now those who did the latter need to worry that someone more malicious than Scoble will even lift it from there.

  126. Every identity theft warning about Facebook includes hiding your birthday either completely or making it friends only. Now those who did the latter need to worry that someone more malicious than Scoble will even lift it from there.

  127. Off topic:

    Shelly from burningbird.net (commenter upthread), your website crashes safari, and firefox on a mac.

  128. Off topic:

    Shelly from burningbird.net (commenter upthread), your website crashes safari, and firefox on a mac.

  129. [...] has been no lack of commentary [ Mulley | Alexia | Nick | Dare ] on Robert Scoble’s use of an unreleased data scraper tool to mine his friends’ personal information from Facebook, and his subsequent explusion from [...]

  130. Out of curiousity, do you (Scoble) have access to the privacy policy that covers Plaxo’s retention and use of the data gathered through this feature?

  131. Facebook? More like StingyBook with data it grabs from other open sites:
    http://cogdogblog.com/2007/11/18/stingybook/

    Anyone can scrape away at my FB profile; they will find obvious lies on my birthdate (Apr 1), that I graduated in 1935 with a PhD from Harvard, and I was once a CEO of a large software company before that Bill guy came on board.

  132. Facebook? More like StingyBook with data it grabs from other open sites:
    http://cogdogblog.com/2007/11/18/stingybook/

    Anyone can scrape away at my FB profile; they will find obvious lies on my birthdate (Apr 1), that I graduated in 1935 with a PhD from Harvard, and I was once a CEO of a large software company before that Bill guy came on board.

  133. Out of curiousity, do you (Scoble) have access to the privacy policy that covers Plaxo’s retention and use of the data gathered through this feature?

  134. “It’s ironic that you can import your Gmail address book into Facebook but you can’t export back out.”

    I don’t think Irony has anything to do with it. What it is is unethical. Just about everything Microsoft vends works this way too, except in cases where extreme user pressure or legal pressure has been applied.

    If users held the companies they used to any kind of ethical standard the world would be a better place, and companies such as Facebook would either change or go out of business. In Facebook;s case I hope it is the latter.

  135. “It’s ironic that you can import your Gmail address book into Facebook but you can’t export back out.”

    I don’t think Irony has anything to do with it. What it is is unethical. Just about everything Microsoft vends works this way too, except in cases where extreme user pressure or legal pressure has been applied.

    If users held the companies they used to any kind of ethical standard the world would be a better place, and companies such as Facebook would either change or go out of business. In Facebook;s case I hope it is the latter.

  136. To Steve regarding my site: Thanks for indirect note. I just checked my site with Firefox 2 and 3, Safari 3, and Opera 9, using Mac (Tiger, not Leopard), and I didn’t have a problem.

    Can you email me more details? shelleyp@burningbird.ndet.

    Oh, and Robert: don’t enter that into Plaxo. Oh that’s right: I’m not one of your friends. Not nice enough.

  137. To Steve regarding my site: Thanks for indirect note. I just checked my site with Firefox 2 and 3, Safari 3, and Opera 9, using Mac (Tiger, not Leopard), and I didn’t have a problem.

    Can you email me more details? shelleyp@burningbird.ndet.

    Oh, and Robert: don’t enter that into Plaxo. Oh that’s right: I’m not one of your friends. Not nice enough.

  138. Bail is set high at Facebook. Doc Searls recently noted that these sites are still a walled garden . . . somebody’s private space. Unfortunately, they aren’t OUR space, we are just renters in a huge development that has a boatload of private security guards that aren’t willing (or maybe not able) to share the rules with us.

    I was in the manual friending mode and got bumped . . . wasn’t the point “making” friends?

    http://carterfsmith.blogspot.com/2008/01/how-to-get-kicked-off-facebook-personal.html

  139. Bail is set high at Facebook. Doc Searls recently noted that these sites are still a walled garden . . . somebody’s private space. Unfortunately, they aren’t OUR space, we are just renters in a huge development that has a boatload of private security guards that aren’t willing (or maybe not able) to share the rules with us.

    I was in the manual friending mode and got bumped . . . wasn’t the point “making” friends?

    http://carterfsmith.blogspot.com/2008/01/how-to-get-kicked-off-facebook-personal.html

  140. Why is it that the privacy people who crowed about Beacon aren’t furious at Scoble?

    Because there’s a difference between Facebook, WITHOUT YOUR PERMISSION, informing all your friends that you just bought a crate of extra-strength Depends and rented a copy of “Brokeback Mountain” for the 12th time this year…

    …and one of your friends making a copy of an email address YOU ALREADY ALLOWED HIM TO SEE.

    I know, subtle difference, right?

  141. Why is it that the privacy people who crowed about Beacon aren’t furious at Scoble?

    Because there’s a difference between Facebook, WITHOUT YOUR PERMISSION, informing all your friends that you just bought a crate of extra-strength Depends and rented a copy of “Brokeback Mountain” for the 12th time this year…

    …and one of your friends making a copy of an email address YOU ALREADY ALLOWED HIM TO SEE.

    I know, subtle difference, right?

  142. Mac Beach,

    If Google want to block Facebook scraping their site, let Google do so… and we can all make a decision whether to carry on using GMail.

    If Facebook want to block others scraping their site, let Facebook do so… and we can all make a decision whether to carry on using Facebook.

    You may not like Facebook’s terms of service…

    - You have a right not to like them.

    - You have a right not to use Facebook.

    - You have a right to wish that Facebook would go out of business if you want :-)

    - What NO-ONE has a right to do is extract data out of it and give it out to a company I’ve chosen not to do business with.

    I don’t care whether the company is Amazon and the mechanism Beacon… or whether the company is Plaxo and the mechanism Facebook.

  143. Mac Beach,

    If Google want to block Facebook scraping their site, let Google do so… and we can all make a decision whether to carry on using GMail.

    If Facebook want to block others scraping their site, let Facebook do so… and we can all make a decision whether to carry on using Facebook.

    You may not like Facebook’s terms of service…

    - You have a right not to like them.

    - You have a right not to use Facebook.

    - You have a right to wish that Facebook would go out of business if you want :-)

    - What NO-ONE has a right to do is extract data out of it and give it out to a company I’ve chosen not to do business with.

    I don’t care whether the company is Amazon and the mechanism Beacon… or whether the company is Plaxo and the mechanism Facebook.

  144. I tried using Plaxo Pulse’s Facbook feature about a week ago, it didn’t work. i guess that’s a good thing otherwise i may have been cut too. I just wonder why my didn’t work?

    Also, why should i not be able to pull this information off, it is available to me anyway. if i had a million hours in a day I could just go through each friend and re-type all this information into my apple address book or wherever i want, why not just make it a little nicer and easier for me?

  145. I tried using Plaxo Pulse’s Facbook feature about a week ago, it didn’t work. i guess that’s a good thing otherwise i may have been cut too. I just wonder why my didn’t work?

    Also, why should i not be able to pull this information off, it is available to me anyway. if i had a million hours in a day I could just go through each friend and re-type all this information into my apple address book or wherever i want, why not just make it a little nicer and easier for me?

  146. dont forget Scoble hiring you: Coultergate

    Good point, it was in the cards (I needed the $), but being Podtech, it went well beyond just the usual Scoble Curse. But water over the bridge now.

  147. dont forget Scoble hiring you: Coultergate

    Good point, it was in the cards (I needed the $), but being Podtech, it went well beyond just the usual Scoble Curse. But water over the bridge now.

  148. Scoble’s said in the past that his facebook “friends” are a who’s who of the Tech Industry http://scobleizer.com/2007/12/11/steal-my-content-please/

    Debatable, but let’s assume it is. Imagine how valuable that could be to some spammers, direct marketing firms, or any one else in the industry. Point is, it can be gathered very quickly, and then sold or passed on. Sure Scoble my have your email and birthday and could certainly manually move it to Outlook or Plaxo, but I rather doubt he would take the time to it with “5000 friends”. The point here is, while I may have implicitly given Scoble this data, I didn’t given him permission to do whatever he wants with it. I think there is an assumption, right or wrong, that this information will stay within the facebook garden and people won’t be running tools to harvest it to be used or sold.

  149. Scoble’s said in the past that his facebook “friends” are a who’s who of the Tech Industry http://scobleizer.com/2007/12/11/steal-my-content-please/

    Debatable, but let’s assume it is. Imagine how valuable that could be to some spammers, direct marketing firms, or any one else in the industry. Point is, it can be gathered very quickly, and then sold or passed on. Sure Scoble my have your email and birthday and could certainly manually move it to Outlook or Plaxo, but I rather doubt he would take the time to it with “5000 friends”. The point here is, while I may have implicitly given Scoble this data, I didn’t given him permission to do whatever he wants with it. I think there is an assumption, right or wrong, that this information will stay within the facebook garden and people won’t be running tools to harvest it to be used or sold.

  150. One point that I don’t see clearly pointed out: *Your* Facebook friends email address information, is *not* Facebook data. This data belongs to your friends. As they’ve chosen to allow *you* to have access to that data, why are *you* not able to compile that information into Outlook via Plaxo? One more reason to abandon Facebook.

  151. One point that I don’t see clearly pointed out: *Your* Facebook friends email address information, is *not* Facebook data. This data belongs to your friends. As they’ve chosen to allow *you* to have access to that data, why are *you* not able to compile that information into Outlook via Plaxo? One more reason to abandon Facebook.

  152. Who in the hell has 5,000 friends? Can it be anything but self-serving to gather that many “friends” on any network? If you agreed to be Robert’s friend without really knowing Robert and without really being his friend, then you are a stupid sheep and deserve to have Robert scrape your data and share it with his real friends, the people with whom he had an NDA. And if you were a real friend of Robert, you probably already knew he’d yank your information and give it to some other network and you wouldn’t have cared one whit. So all you whiners can just shut your pie hole. You deserved what you got. Now go suck up to some other “famous” blogger. It will make you feel important every time you see your name on his “friends” list with the 4,999 others there. And of course, in the interests of full disclosure, I’ve only written this post to get a link from Scoble’s site back to my horribly neglected blog. Thanks, Robert for giving me the backlink. -Tyler

  153. Who in the hell has 5,000 friends? Can it be anything but self-serving to gather that many “friends” on any network? If you agreed to be Robert’s friend without really knowing Robert and without really being his friend, then you are a stupid sheep and deserve to have Robert scrape your data and share it with his real friends, the people with whom he had an NDA. And if you were a real friend of Robert, you probably already knew he’d yank your information and give it to some other network and you wouldn’t have cared one whit. So all you whiners can just shut your pie hole. You deserved what you got. Now go suck up to some other “famous” blogger. It will make you feel important every time you see your name on his “friends” list with the 4,999 others there. And of course, in the interests of full disclosure, I’ve only written this post to get a link from Scoble’s site back to my horribly neglected blog. Thanks, Robert for giving me the backlink. -Tyler

  154. Well I was going to say that you have my info for Plaxo already because I comment here, but I realized that the e-mail address in my WP.com profile is not the one I have in use for Plaxo.

  155. Well I was going to say that you have my info for Plaxo already because I comment here, but I realized that the e-mail address in my WP.com profile is not the one I have in use for Plaxo.

  156. Scoblegate: Plaxo incursion into Facebook-land

    I read one of Scoble’s tweet’s yesterday about how he was kicked off Facebook for running a script on Facebook.  My thought was how silly this was given Scoble’s influence and that if there was some sort of misunderstanding Facebook …

  157. Did you ask all of your 5,000 friends permission to take their data outside of Facebook to be used in your 3rd party application? (Outlook) As far as I’m aware, people need to opt-in to this sort of thing for data protection here in the UK. This simply appears to be a flagrant disregard for people that have naievly been accepted as a friend on Facebook, only to have their data used for your and Plaxos self promotion.

    Shame on you

  158. Did you ask all of your 5,000 friends permission to take their data outside of Facebook to be used in your 3rd party application? (Outlook) As far as I’m aware, people need to opt-in to this sort of thing for data protection here in the UK. This simply appears to be a flagrant disregard for people that have naievly been accepted as a friend on Facebook, only to have their data used for your and Plaxos self promotion.

    Shame on you

  159. I’m not a user or fan of Plaxo, as I’ve always been hit by lots of unnecessary update information by contacts of mine who do use it…

    But if the application collected name, email address and birthday, is that really valuable personal information you don’t want to give out? Then take it off your Facebook profile!

    It would take most people about 30 seconds to find my name and email address on countless websites, including my business, and my blog. And despite the fact I tend to keep my birthday private, I’m fairly sure that it would be available on some sites I’ve forgotten.

    If I’ve done that, then it’s publicly available and out there, whether it’s to five friends, or five thousand. It’s down to you to decide what information your friends might scrape, or copy and paste into Outlook, and what you might wish to remain private.

    After all, how do ya think Spam email works, for crying out loud?

    If you think this is scary, I take it you haven’t heard of Spokeo?
    http://thewayoftheweb.blogspot.com/2007/12/spokeo-scary-side-of-web-20.html
    Monitor all your friends, across lots of networks, without them knowing…

  160. I’m not a user or fan of Plaxo, as I’ve always been hit by lots of unnecessary update information by contacts of mine who do use it…

    But if the application collected name, email address and birthday, is that really valuable personal information you don’t want to give out? Then take it off your Facebook profile!

    It would take most people about 30 seconds to find my name and email address on countless websites, including my business, and my blog. And despite the fact I tend to keep my birthday private, I’m fairly sure that it would be available on some sites I’ve forgotten.

    If I’ve done that, then it’s publicly available and out there, whether it’s to five friends, or five thousand. It’s down to you to decide what information your friends might scrape, or copy and paste into Outlook, and what you might wish to remain private.

    After all, how do ya think Spam email works, for crying out loud?

    If you think this is scary, I take it you haven’t heard of Spokeo?
    http://thewayoftheweb.blogspot.com/2007/12/spokeo-scary-side-of-web-20.html
    Monitor all your friends, across lots of networks, without them knowing…

  161. But is it legal than Plaxo Pulse can extract and keep facebook profile and list of friend with name ?

    I don’t understand if it is legal or not ? can we keep somewhere a list of profiles ?
    With this http://developers.facebook.com/documentation.php?v=1.0&doc=misc
    , the Plaxo process is not legal, no ? yes ?

    Victor

    The discussion here :
    http://groups.google.fr/group/social-network-portability/browse_frm/thread/45185bca8138953d/c9a21d36e7759001?tvc=1#c9a21d36e7759001

  162. But is it legal than Plaxo Pulse can extract and keep facebook profile and list of friend with name ?

    I don’t understand if it is legal or not ? can we keep somewhere a list of profiles ?
    With this http://developers.facebook.com/documentation.php?v=1.0&doc=misc
    , the Plaxo process is not legal, no ? yes ?

    Victor

    The discussion here :
    http://groups.google.fr/group/social-network-portability/browse_frm/thread/45185bca8138953d/c9a21d36e7759001?tvc=1#c9a21d36e7759001

  163. If you the people you linked to on Facebook were really your friends you wouldn’t have thousands of them and you wouldn’t need software to collect the information. You’d be able to go through and to do it yourself or… Gasp, they’re your friends! You already know most of their birthdays and whether or not they’re on Plaxo!

  164. If you the people you linked to on Facebook were really your friends you wouldn’t have thousands of them and you wouldn’t need software to collect the information. You’d be able to go through and to do it yourself or… Gasp, they’re your friends! You already know most of their birthdays and whether or not they’re on Plaxo!

  165. I think you’re a great guy, Robert, but i have to voice my natural concerns here (and nrmally i am NOT paranoid about privacy etc!): I added you as a friend on facebook, and greatfully accepted(thanks!) but had NO idea that you would start using pre-release (beta? potentially buggy??) software to extract my data off Facebook… I feel a *tad* annoyed there…

    I happen to use Plaxo,trust them etc, but imagine this pre-release software is compromised and another party accesses it?

  166. I think you’re a great guy, Robert, but i have to voice my natural concerns here (and nrmally i am NOT paranoid about privacy etc!): I added you as a friend on facebook, and greatfully accepted(thanks!) but had NO idea that you would start using pre-release (beta? potentially buggy??) software to extract my data off Facebook… I feel a *tad* annoyed there…

    I happen to use Plaxo,trust them etc, but imagine this pre-release software is compromised and another party accesses it?

  167. Geez Scoob I must be a mind reader. I nailed it yesterday when I said your script was probably running through your account sucking down data.

    I’m off to Vegas now baby!

  168. Geez Scoob I must be a mind reader. I nailed it yesterday when I said your script was probably running through your account sucking down data.

    I’m off to Vegas now baby!

  169. Thanks Robert, your latest adventure alerted me to how vulnerable my email address was to being sucked into the evil spammy Plaxo.

    I have now restricted access to my email address until the privacy filters down to the new friends lists functionality.

    Keep up the good work but don’t waste all your time on Facebook;)

  170. Thanks Robert, your latest adventure alerted me to how vulnerable my email address was to being sucked into the evil spammy Plaxo.

    I have now restricted access to my email address until the privacy filters down to the new friends lists functionality.

    Keep up the good work but don’t waste all your time on Facebook;)

  171. If those people confirmed that you are a friend of them then you are allowed to get their information. If you had tried to pull not just friends but some others than it is something…

  172. If those people confirmed that you are a friend of them then you are allowed to get their information. If you had tried to pull not just friends but some others than it is something…

  173. Scoble, I was wondering if you know of any OCR script that will allow me to copy e-mail addresses from a network (i.e. my college) and copy them into A FB import file.

    jp

  174. Scoble, I was wondering if you know of any OCR script that will allow me to copy e-mail addresses from a network (i.e. my college) and copy them into A FB import file.

    jp

  175. If it’s on the web, you can only get pissy with yourself for not having the foresight to not put it out there. Any one of your FB friends could expose any bit of data about you they care to–if you show it to them.

    Scoble, I think this is fantastic. Not so much that the data were sent to such-and-such corp, but that (1) you were able to automate it and (2) that it woke people up to data security who are outside of IT by a long shot. It’s precisely this kind of destruction of naiivete that is going to help push end users to learn what they’re dealing with and how to protect themselves if they are uncomfortable with spreading their personal data all over.

  176. If it’s on the web, you can only get pissy with yourself for not having the foresight to not put it out there. Any one of your FB friends could expose any bit of data about you they care to–if you show it to them.

    Scoble, I think this is fantastic. Not so much that the data were sent to such-and-such corp, but that (1) you were able to automate it and (2) that it woke people up to data security who are outside of IT by a long shot. It’s precisely this kind of destruction of naiivete that is going to help push end users to learn what they’re dealing with and how to protect themselves if they are uncomfortable with spreading their personal data all over.

  177. Downloading copies of pieces of 4,999 records is a different context than handwriting those same pieces of 4,999 records. The download is most likely not for the same purpose as the handwriting.

    Also, I don’t think anyone really has 4,999 friends. I seriously doubt that anyone has more than 8 really close friends with whom they would feel totally comfortable sharing very personal feelings.

  178. Downloading copies of pieces of 4,999 records is a different context than handwriting those same pieces of 4,999 records. The download is most likely not for the same purpose as the handwriting.

    Also, I don’t think anyone really has 4,999 friends. I seriously doubt that anyone has more than 8 really close friends with whom they would feel totally comfortable sharing very personal feelings.

  179. If it’s on the web, you can only get pissy with yourself for not having the foresight to not put it out there. Any one of your FB friends could expose any bit of data about you they care to–if you show it to them…

  180. If it’s on the web, you can only get pissy with yourself for not having the foresight to not put it out there. Any one of your FB friends could expose any bit of data about you they care to–if you show it to them…

  181. It’s all good, I won’t turn you in, or anything. Even if I don’t get cut in. All you have is my honor. Although I do like the girl. You let her know that I know and to talk if theres any jibber jabber to be done.

  182. It’s all good, I won’t turn you in, or anything. Even if I don’t get cut in. All you have is my honor. Although I do like the girl. You let her know that I know and to talk if theres any jibber jabber to be done.

  183. Tereasa Valdez Klein should not use the word retarded.

    That would is both very derogatory and both very offensive to people who are mentally challenged.

    I don’t think that she knows what that word means or the full ramiforcations of it.

    I don’t think that Ms.Klein has been exposed to be who are mentally challenged.

    If she was she wouldn’t be making the disparaging remarks that she did.

    Ms.Klein needs to show some empathy towards people who are relatively different than what she is.

  184. Tereasa Valdez Klein should not use the word retarded.

    That would is both very derogatory and both very offensive to people who are mentally challenged.

    I don’t think that she knows what that word means or the full ramiforcations of it.

    I don’t think that Ms.Klein has been exposed to be who are mentally challenged.

    If she was she wouldn’t be making the disparaging remarks that she did.

    Ms.Klein needs to show some empathy towards people who are relatively different than what she is.