What to do if you're laid off in 2008 recession

It’s sad to hear about layoffs at companies like Yahoo. Right now it seems like a bad time to be laid off. I’m here to offer some hope.

I laid myself off in February 2002. Remember that time? It was far worse than what we’ve seen so far in the economic turmoil of 2008. It seemed like EVERYONE was laid off. There was even a Website, fuckedcompany.com, that tracked layoff after layoff. No good news, like the funding of Automattic, was coming out. 9/11 just happened and it seemed to be particularly dire.

But even in that tough time I found a job working at NEC. Here’s some tips I learned from that time.

1. Don’t get lazy. It might seem dire, but if you work it you WILL find a job. Some of my friends went on vacation, started drinking, or generally just hung out with their families. Those people took a LOT longer to find a job than the friends of mine who approached their time off with these tips.
2. Make sure you spend at least 30% of every day trying to find a job. That means working on your resume. Getting your cover letter finished. Sending out resumes. Searching the web for work. Networking. Etc. At first your time spent on these tasks should be a lot higher, but after weeks of watching the job sites for jobs and having your resume checked over by 10 of your friends you will naturally have more time to spend on other things.
3. Start a blog on the field you want to work in. Want to be a PHP programmer? Start a PHP blog and make sure you put world class stuff there. Link to EVERYONE who has a PHP blog. But that’s only the beginning.
4. Do things that will get you to be recognized as a world leader in the field you want to be in. Are you a programmer? Build something and put it up! Share your knowledge on your blog (give tips you’ve learned). Are you a program manager? Those jobs will be tougher to find, but you should demonstrate that you are a great manager of people as well as that you’re expert on the kinds of things you want to do. Demo! Demo! Demo!
5. Learn from Loic Le Meur. How did he get thousands of videos uploaded on Seesmic everyday? He networked. He visited tons of journalists, bloggers, executives. He is a consumate networker (you should watch him work the halls here at the World Economic Forum).
6. Do a video everyday on YouTube that demonstrates something you know. Loic does a video everyday. If you’re laid off you have absolutely no excuses. Get a cheap Web cam and get over to YouTube or Seesmic.
7. Show your friends your resume and cover letter. Don’t have any friends? Now is the time to make some. Call up some interesting people and ask for an informational interview. This is particularly key if you work at a big company and are getting laid off. I watched people at Microsoft get laid off and the ones who had tons of internal informational interviews got new jobs fast. The key is to meet people everyday and get in front of them. Not to beg for a job, but to do research on the industry you want to work in. You’d be amazed how showing some interest in your industry will get noticed itself.
8. Do the basics. I got my NEC job by sending a resume into a job that I found on Craig’s List. Yes, my blog helped me AFTER I got the interview, but I got the interview just by having a great cover letter and an interesting resume.
9. Don’t feel bad about taking government assistance. You’ll need it to pay your bills. I took it and it helped me get over that tough period.
10. Go to any job networking session you learn about. All of them were valuable to me, even though they didn’t necessarily bring me a job. Part of it is just feeling like you’re doing everything you can to get back on your feet. It’s an attitude thing. If you have an attitude that you’re going to work at this that will come across and will bring opportunities to you.
11. Go where the money is. If you are laid off and you haven’t sent your resume to Matt Mullenweg this morning, why not? People with new funding are the ones who are hiring. You want to work for them, so do what you can to at minimum get an informational interview. Why don’t you interview Matt for your blog? You never know, he just might give you an interview and that might lead to a discussion about how you could fit into his company. Even if it doesn’t, at least you get an interesting interview with someone in the industry who is seeing success. Other employers want to be like Matt, so if you have some insights to his success you might be surprised by how that gets you job interviews.
12. Take a little bit of time to work on family and health. You probably haven’t been paying enough attention to these two things. This is the time to start some healthy habits. Give up smoking, if you’re doing that. Drink less (the temptation will be to drink more, don’t give in). Get more exercise. Yes, I should take my own advice (I went for a long walk this morning in Davos and had fish last night).
13. Volunteer. Let’s say you are going to be out of work for six months. What could you do with six months of your time? Make sure you come away with it with a great project under your belt. Why not volunteer your time with a charity that could use your skills? Not only will you feel good about yourself, you’ll come away with job experience so you won’t have a hole in your resume (building an IT system for the Red Cross looks damn impressive — saying you were “on the beach” for six months does not). Plus you’ll make great friends with people who are trying to improve the world (they are typically the kinds of friends you should have anyway).
14. Make sure you take advantage of any help your former employer is offering. Sometimes they have retraining or other programs that might help you land an even better job.
15. See if you can keep coming into the office. This isn’t open to everyone, but at Userland I kept coming into work everyday after the paychecks stopped. That made me feel better, plus it gave me the ability to use phones, stay away from negative situations (do you really want to be around family all day, everyday, who might remind you that you need to find a job?) as well as give you a place to work hard on finding your new job.
16. Go to every business event you can attend. Can’t afford to get in? Me neither and I have a job! Hang out in the hallways. You never know who you might meet. At minimum you’ll get interesting interviews for your blog. Have your resumes ready.
17. Always have your suit ready. Some interviews happen fast “can you be here this afternoon?” The one who is ready will get the interview.

On your resume and cover letter. I found a TON of tips online for how to improve yours. Those tips work. Listen to them. My cover letter is what got me my interview (the guy who ran the group told me that later). My cover letter’s approach came off of tips I found online. Do Google searches for things like “how to write a great cover letter.”

Do you have any tips? Help out people by posting your own blogs and linking to them in my comment area here. Good luck and keep your head up. Lots of people have gotten fired. I’ve talked with quite a few CEOs here at the World Economic Forum and you’d be surprised at how many of them have had bad times in their careers.

I’ll be asking business leaders this week for their tips and will come back to this topic later in the week.

Comments

  1. The beautiful aspect about getting laid off in the 21st century is that – you can take advantage of the WEB to either supplement or be your income.

    Unlike any other period in civilization – we are not totally dependant on brick and motar companies hiring or being at a specific location to start a business.

    Ecommerce sites, affiliate programs and search engine marketing have never been easier.

    Even seeking a job is relatively easy and cheaper with Craigslist and email. Gone are the days of open pre screening interview and faxing resumes.

  2. The beautiful aspect about getting laid off in the 21st century is that – you can take advantage of the WEB to either supplement or be your income.

    Unlike any other period in civilization – we are not totally dependant on brick and motar companies hiring or being at a specific location to start a business.

    Ecommerce sites, affiliate programs and search engine marketing have never been easier.

    Even seeking a job is relatively easy and cheaper with Craigslist and email. Gone are the days of open pre screening interview and faxing resumes.

  3. I wonder if someone could make a stratup to really take advantage of the Internet, so more and more people could work from home over the Internet, as freelance in everything. Earn money from Youtube (how much does youtube pay partners per 1000 views? currently it seems to only be for US residents), monetizing online photography, providing independant online music artists a way to make money publishing their music on sites like http://last.fm or the type of site like the old mp3.com

    Though not everyone can be artists or reporters and make a living out of it. So I guess sites like getafreelancer.com and elance.com should become much bigger and integrate many kinds of work done using the Internet.

    It’s happening already? Perhaps, there are a lot of freelancers and a few people making a living with their blogs and video-blogs, but how about a system that could integrate nearly any type of job and have it monetized to its maximum using the Internet.

  4. I wonder if someone could make a stratup to really take advantage of the Internet, so more and more people could work from home over the Internet, as freelance in everything. Earn money from Youtube (how much does youtube pay partners per 1000 views? currently it seems to only be for US residents), monetizing online photography, providing independant online music artists a way to make money publishing their music on sites like http://last.fm or the type of site like the old mp3.com

    Though not everyone can be artists or reporters and make a living out of it. So I guess sites like getafreelancer.com and elance.com should become much bigger and integrate many kinds of work done using the Internet.

    It’s happening already? Perhaps, there are a lot of freelancers and a few people making a living with their blogs and video-blogs, but how about a system that could integrate nearly any type of job and have it monetized to its maximum using the Internet.

  5. That was a great post and not only useful in the advice and guidance but also from a “I am not alone” perspective. The fact that you, a “name” in the industry, has been there is an incentive to everyone to take their future into their own hands.

    I’m fortunate in that I’m now VERY close to retirement after 45 years in the industry so if I’m laid off this time it won’t matter to me but I’ve lived though a number of these cycles and your advice is absolutely on the button. In recent years I’ve been working in a volatile industry, biotech, and have seen several cycles like this. All you say absolutely applies and I’ll be handing out a link to your blog when the next round hits my friends and colleagues.

    It also applies if you just want to change your job. I spent several months last trying to find a “better” job to end my career, something more meaningful. Your approach was pretty-well my approach too and even at 64 I was able to get several offers … but sanity ( and family and friends “you are thinking of WHAT!”) hit and I decided to stay where I was.

    Good luck with your new job… and don’t forget to update your blog’s about to reflect it.
    John

  6. That was a great post and not only useful in the advice and guidance but also from a “I am not alone” perspective. The fact that you, a “name” in the industry, has been there is an incentive to everyone to take their future into their own hands.

    I’m fortunate in that I’m now VERY close to retirement after 45 years in the industry so if I’m laid off this time it won’t matter to me but I’ve lived though a number of these cycles and your advice is absolutely on the button. In recent years I’ve been working in a volatile industry, biotech, and have seen several cycles like this. All you say absolutely applies and I’ll be handing out a link to your blog when the next round hits my friends and colleagues.

    It also applies if you just want to change your job. I spent several months last trying to find a “better” job to end my career, something more meaningful. Your approach was pretty-well my approach too and even at 64 I was able to get several offers … but sanity ( and family and friends “you are thinking of WHAT!”) hit and I decided to stay where I was.

    Good luck with your new job… and don’t forget to update your blog’s about to reflect it.
    John

  7. I am surprised you didn’t mention one very important thing. Try freelancing if you can. Given the number of freelance or solo gig resources that are out there today, it is a very viable option. Freelanceswitch.com is a treasure trove of information, and no I am not affiliated with them in any way except being a fan.

  8. I am surprised you didn’t mention one very important thing. Try freelancing if you can. Given the number of freelance or solo gig resources that are out there today, it is a very viable option. Freelanceswitch.com is a treasure trove of information, and no I am not affiliated with them in any way except being a fan.

  9. I actually passed this along to a friend who is employed, but wants to “get into technology”. For someone who is not in the technology world, it is tough to communicate how to do that, but a number of your tips really seem to help with that.

    As always, great stuff!

    John

  10. I actually passed this along to a friend who is employed, but wants to “get into technology”. For someone who is not in the technology world, it is tough to communicate how to do that, but a number of your tips really seem to help with that.

    As always, great stuff!

    John

  11. If you have enough money saved you should take a vacation immediately.

    I recommend somewhere a long way away from cubicles like here http://flickr.com/photos/19442561@N00/119647194/

    1. Think about what you want to do next and come back ready to do an effective job search.

    2. The job hunt may take a while and you won’t get any vacation in your new job for a while.

    3. The government probably won’t pay you benefits when you are not actively seeking work.

  12. Might want to check out theladders.com; they do a good job of providing resume examples; professional resources for resumes; job tips, and, of course, job listings! A big help is also the resume keyword list, which is like an SEO tagging of your resume. This will help your resume pass through the first level of approval, which is usually scanned by a computer.
    Kyle

  13. If you have enough money saved you should take a vacation immediately.

    I recommend somewhere a long way away from cubicles like here http://flickr.com/photos/19442561@N00/119647194/

    1. Think about what you want to do next and come back ready to do an effective job search.

    2. The job hunt may take a while and you won’t get any vacation in your new job for a while.

    3. The government probably won’t pay you benefits when you are not actively seeking work.

  14. Might want to check out theladders.com; they do a good job of providing resume examples; professional resources for resumes; job tips, and, of course, job listings! A big help is also the resume keyword list, which is like an SEO tagging of your resume. This will help your resume pass through the first level of approval, which is usually scanned by a computer.
    Kyle

  15. Challenge yourself to communicate (resume, cover letter, interview, networking) by focusing on the person you’re talking to, and on what you’re trying to accomplish. In the job-search setting, this means 1) know how you add value and 2) address the needs of the person you’re interacting with.

    Any job hunter (or employee) is an entrepreneur in the business of selling time and skills to someone who can build value/make money from them. End of story. See it that way, learn to describe yourself that way, and it becomes less work for the hiring manager to figure out what to do with you and why you’d be a valuable hire.

    Particularly in a rough economy, understand how you can help a company that’s facing those realities. Pursue knowledge and skills that are particularly helpful in tough times. No matter how bad it gets, every company has money for things that will make them more money. See yourself that way.

    You need to understand *and articulate* the audience-specific objectives for what you say/write/etc. Think about the person reading your cover letter/doing your interview. What do they want and need? How can you help them? Make sure they know this.

    Most of all, take heart. Every layoff we’ve been through (4 and counting) has led to something wonderful eventually. Hang in there! http://pistachioconsulting.com/blog/?p=175

  16. Challenge yourself to communicate (resume, cover letter, interview, networking) by focusing on the person you’re talking to, and on what you’re trying to accomplish. In the job-search setting, this means 1) know how you add value and 2) address the needs of the person you’re interacting with.

    Any job hunter (or employee) is an entrepreneur in the business of selling time and skills to someone who can build value/make money from them. End of story. See it that way, learn to describe yourself that way, and it becomes less work for the hiring manager to figure out what to do with you and why you’d be a valuable hire.

    Particularly in a rough economy, understand how you can help a company that’s facing those realities. Pursue knowledge and skills that are particularly helpful in tough times. No matter how bad it gets, every company has money for things that will make them more money. See yourself that way.

    You need to understand *and articulate* the audience-specific objectives for what you say/write/etc. Think about the person reading your cover letter/doing your interview. What do they want and need? How can you help them? Make sure they know this.

    Most of all, take heart. Every layoff we’ve been through (4 and counting) has led to something wonderful eventually. Hang in there! http://pistachioconsulting.com/blog/?p=175

  17. Do what I did too, and contact your local TV station or newspaper for an interview — they are always looking for stories on people trying interesting ways to find work, such as blogs about how to find a job. Anything that stands out will get you noticed!

    And remember, finding a job is a job in itself. But take time to hit the gym or take a walk; don’t stress, something always comes along if you keep positive.

    Great post.

  18. Do what I did too, and contact your local TV station or newspaper for an interview — they are always looking for stories on people trying interesting ways to find work, such as blogs about how to find a job. Anything that stands out will get you noticed!

    And remember, finding a job is a job in itself. But take time to hit the gym or take a walk; don’t stress, something always comes along if you keep positive.

    Great post.

  19. Good tips, Robert.

    There’s an old populist view on economic downturns: A recession is when your neighbor loses his job. A depression is when you lose yours.

    However, to be technical, a recession is a trailing indicator–it represents a downturn of GDP for two consecutive quarters. It does seem like we’re entering a recession, but that won’t be known for sure for at least another 3 to 6 months, at which time we may already be moving out of it.

    As you talk to economists at the World Economic Forum, you can have them educate you on this, if you’d like.

  20. Good tips, Robert.

    There’s an old populist view on economic downturns: A recession is when your neighbor loses his job. A depression is when you lose yours.

    However, to be technical, a recession is a trailing indicator–it represents a downturn of GDP for two consecutive quarters. It does seem like we’re entering a recession, but that won’t be known for sure for at least another 3 to 6 months, at which time we may already be moving out of it.

    As you talk to economists at the World Economic Forum, you can have them educate you on this, if you’d like.

  21. Save your children from being sold into slavery: Burn your unemployment insurance campaigning for Ron Paul.

  22. Save your children from being sold into slavery: Burn your unemployment insurance campaigning for Ron Paul.

  23. All good stuff!

    I was laid off in 2002 also and took some time off before looking again. I probably did pay for it later. I’d view taking time off as a tradeoff. It’s a great chance to do some other things – not just slack off – but it will cost you down the road.

    I was burnt out from the startup I’d been working at when it folded and I’d already planned to spend a month or two remodelling my house. That all worked out but it probably meant I spent another two months building a network and finding a job.

  24. All good stuff!

    I was laid off in 2002 also and took some time off before looking again. I probably did pay for it later. I’d view taking time off as a tradeoff. It’s a great chance to do some other things – not just slack off – but it will cost you down the road.

    I was burnt out from the startup I’d been working at when it folded and I’d already planned to spend a month or two remodelling my house. That all worked out but it probably meant I spent another two months building a network and finding a job.

  25. Keep in mind one huge technology change in the way your submitted resume is “read”: by software, not humans.

    Writing resume for a headhunter for side money many years ago I discovered one critical job-finding tip: most resumes now are scanned and parsed by software in HR departments and only a small number of those get to hiring managers hands.

    Tip? Increase your odds by placing your qualifying keywords (software experience, certifications, etc.) at the top of your resume where the scanning software will lift it and match it with any job keywords the employer has listed in the job notice.

    It works. Because I’m a technical writer and people ask me, I’ve volunteer re-written resumes for many people over the years, from ex-White House guys to geeks just out of school.

    When I’ve rewritten their resume to include keywords at the top where the scanning software can read it (and not buried on the second or third page)…they get interviews and then that converts to a job.

    It’s a simple, FREE step that brings big rewards. And …oh…remember to smile.

  26. Keep in mind one huge technology change in the way your submitted resume is “read”: by software, not humans.

    Writing resume for a headhunter for side money many years ago I discovered one critical job-finding tip: most resumes now are scanned and parsed by software in HR departments and only a small number of those get to hiring managers hands.

    Tip? Increase your odds by placing your qualifying keywords (software experience, certifications, etc.) at the top of your resume where the scanning software will lift it and match it with any job keywords the employer has listed in the job notice.

    It works. Because I’m a technical writer and people ask me, I’ve volunteer re-written resumes for many people over the years, from ex-White House guys to geeks just out of school.

    When I’ve rewritten their resume to include keywords at the top where the scanning software can read it (and not buried on the second or third page)…they get interviews and then that converts to a job.

    It’s a simple, FREE step that brings big rewards. And …oh…remember to smile.

  27. Can’t say enough for meeting people! yes, they call it “networking,” but I found that “networking” works best when you’re relaxed and genuine and not thinking “I’m here to network!” Nothing worse than meeting someone who’s only meeting you to pitch you about a business or themselves. So, don’t *think* of it as networking, but think of it as as going to a party or something (just don’t drink as much…) And you’re there to meet people, because people are cool to meet..

    When you’re relaxed and genuine, and somebody says, “what can I do to help you out?” you can say “well, you could give me a job…” in a way that *doesn’t* sound like you’re desperate for a job (although I’d recommend that approach only in certain situations.) That’s actually how I got my first job blogging for someone other than myself. After awhile, enough people will know who you are and you may find calls coming to *you* before you ever think of picking up the phone.

  28. Can’t say enough for meeting people! yes, they call it “networking,” but I found that “networking” works best when you’re relaxed and genuine and not thinking “I’m here to network!” Nothing worse than meeting someone who’s only meeting you to pitch you about a business or themselves. So, don’t *think* of it as networking, but think of it as as going to a party or something (just don’t drink as much…) And you’re there to meet people, because people are cool to meet..

    When you’re relaxed and genuine, and somebody says, “what can I do to help you out?” you can say “well, you could give me a job…” in a way that *doesn’t* sound like you’re desperate for a job (although I’d recommend that approach only in certain situations.) That’s actually how I got my first job blogging for someone other than myself. After awhile, enough people will know who you are and you may find calls coming to *you* before you ever think of picking up the phone.

  29. Here’s one: if you’re in the programming field, write freeware or shareware to network and keep yourself from forgetting how to engineer apps.

  30. Here’s one: if you’re in the programming field, write freeware or shareware to network and keep yourself from forgetting how to engineer apps.

  31. Robert:

    This is a great and helpful post, but I don’t think that it should be limited just to being laid off.

    Sure, there are many elements that would be specific to that situation, but most of them are good advice to undertake now, before getting laid off to build your personal brand.

    Thanks for the advice!

    Kevin

  32. Robert:

    This is a great and helpful post, but I don’t think that it should be limited just to being laid off.

    Sure, there are many elements that would be specific to that situation, but most of them are good advice to undertake now, before getting laid off to build your personal brand.

    Thanks for the advice!

    Kevin

  33. My biggest tip is that if you’re willing, look outside the US. A *lot* of companies in Canada are hiring (including b5media) for positions ranging from dev to sales to finance to marketing. North American doesn’t end at the US border, and because of the dotcom brain drain, there aren’t a tonne of smart, experienced people in Canada – so firms are happy to hire from the US.

  34. My biggest tip is that if you’re willing, look outside the US. A *lot* of companies in Canada are hiring (including b5media) for positions ranging from dev to sales to finance to marketing. North American doesn’t end at the US border, and because of the dotcom brain drain, there aren’t a tonne of smart, experienced people in Canada – so firms are happy to hire from the US.

  35. Seems you are assuming the recession 3- 6 months prior to having the data.
    In any case, companies are still hiring right now.
    Your tips regarding being laid off are good ones especially #1 get out there now.

    Additional tips; Find the right company for you first and then the job. Don’t assume there is no job just because there is not one posted on the web site.
    And next time, have a plan B in place by cultivating relationships with other opportunities prior to needing to move.

  36. Seems you are assuming the recession 3- 6 months prior to having the data.
    In any case, companies are still hiring right now.
    Your tips regarding being laid off are good ones especially #1 get out there now.

    Additional tips; Find the right company for you first and then the job. Don’t assume there is no job just because there is not one posted on the web site.
    And next time, have a plan B in place by cultivating relationships with other opportunities prior to needing to move.

  37. This is a very good blog entry. I left my lousy job in December and have followed much of what you say in this entry just through intuition, although I am no longer looking for a corporate job. I now get many sales leads and my salary is already going to be double what it was in that lousy day job with low pay, half-walled cubicles, lousy office jokes, and seeing the same boring faces every day with the same corporate beauracracy. Personally, I wish I had quit 3 years ago — business has been that good. My commute is like 5 seconds — to put on sandals, get out of bed, and hit the keyboard. To me, it appears that the concept of the corporate job will go away in a decade except for those who absolutely need to be in that office.

  38. This is a very good blog entry. I left my lousy job in December and have followed much of what you say in this entry just through intuition, although I am no longer looking for a corporate job. I now get many sales leads and my salary is already going to be double what it was in that lousy day job with low pay, half-walled cubicles, lousy office jokes, and seeing the same boring faces every day with the same corporate beauracracy. Personally, I wish I had quit 3 years ago — business has been that good. My commute is like 5 seconds — to put on sandals, get out of bed, and hit the keyboard. To me, it appears that the concept of the corporate job will go away in a decade except for those who absolutely need to be in that office.

  39. Thanks Robert!
    I have a friend that might get the ax, he called me the other day kinda down, and I needed ammo to cheer him up, just some kind of direction. Your list is excellent, and could at least be a glimmer of hope.

  40. Thanks Robert!
    I have a friend that might get the ax, he called me the other day kinda down, and I needed ammo to cheer him up, just some kind of direction. Your list is excellent, and could at least be a glimmer of hope.

  41. Great, great advice. Timely too. During the tail end of 2000 I was wrapped up in three or four of those “You can be our CEO as soon as we get funding, Oh, btw, know anyone in the venture community?” deals. I had been negotiating with Gartner for an analyst position which I took with the expectation that within 2 months one of those start-ups would get funded. Gartner was a great place to ride out the storm for the next four years.

    This time around is very similar. Luckily it is not a tech recession so there will be more tech jobs available!

    If you are in security connect up with me via linkedin.com and use my network! http://www.linkedin.com/in/stiennon
    If you are a network guru with MSSP experience on a national level contact me right away!

  42. Great, great advice. Timely too. During the tail end of 2000 I was wrapped up in three or four of those “You can be our CEO as soon as we get funding, Oh, btw, know anyone in the venture community?” deals. I had been negotiating with Gartner for an analyst position which I took with the expectation that within 2 months one of those start-ups would get funded. Gartner was a great place to ride out the storm for the next four years.

    This time around is very similar. Luckily it is not a tech recession so there will be more tech jobs available!

    If you are in security connect up with me via linkedin.com and use my network! http://www.linkedin.com/in/stiennon
    If you are a network guru with MSSP experience on a national level contact me right away!

  43. Regarding #13 – Volunteering: It sounds nice, but its not realistic for everyone. In New York the Department of Labor states the following in its guidelines for receiving unemployment insurance beneftits:
    “You are ineligible for unemployment insurance on any day in which you perform any services in employment or self-employment regardless of whether you are paid for these services.”

  44. Regarding #13 – Volunteering: It sounds nice, but its not realistic for everyone. In New York the Department of Labor states the following in its guidelines for receiving unemployment insurance beneftits:
    “You are ineligible for unemployment insurance on any day in which you perform any services in employment or self-employment regardless of whether you are paid for these services.”

  45. Totally agree Robert. I published my resume on Google Docs, posted about it on my blog – wow, even HUGH linked to it!!

    I got 4 leads, one offer, then eventually got a job through Facebook!

    Paul

  46. Totally agree Robert. I published my resume on Google Docs, posted about it on my blog – wow, even HUGH linked to it!!

    I got 4 leads, one offer, then eventually got a job through Facebook!

    Paul

  47. Robert-

    Very complete post. Most of your tips kept going back to networking. This is so basic and so important, but people often blow this off…they either think it is hard, or that it takes magic, or that networking is ONLY for when you need something (like a job).

    The truth is that if you are not ALWAYS networking you are setting yourself up for failure. The time to network is not when you are looking for a job, but instead while you have a job and things are great. Networking is not about asking others to help you as much as it is you trying to find ways to help others. This is what builds real relationships. If you wait to try to make connections with people until you need something you look desparate.

    People can take a variety of free online surveys that will show them their “networking quotient” to make them think about how they approach networking. It is not about the score you get on these tests, but instead to inspire someone to think about how and why they network.

    This topic (networking) has been huge on all the blogs and social media sites in the last few weeks because of the gloom in the economy…but this is not something people should worry about now….it should be part of their lifestyle.

    thom

  48. Robert-

    Very complete post. Most of your tips kept going back to networking. This is so basic and so important, but people often blow this off…they either think it is hard, or that it takes magic, or that networking is ONLY for when you need something (like a job).

    The truth is that if you are not ALWAYS networking you are setting yourself up for failure. The time to network is not when you are looking for a job, but instead while you have a job and things are great. Networking is not about asking others to help you as much as it is you trying to find ways to help others. This is what builds real relationships. If you wait to try to make connections with people until you need something you look desparate.

    People can take a variety of free online surveys that will show them their “networking quotient” to make them think about how they approach networking. It is not about the score you get on these tests, but instead to inspire someone to think about how and why they network.

    This topic (networking) has been huge on all the blogs and social media sites in the last few weeks because of the gloom in the economy…but this is not something people should worry about now….it should be part of their lifestyle.

    thom

  49. Excellent post, Robert.

    The only point I’d add is I’ve never known anyone who has been laid off and didn’t end up in a better situation.

    Can you post your cover letter as an example?

  50. Excellent post, Robert.

    The only point I’d add is I’ve never known anyone who has been laid off and didn’t end up in a better situation.

    Can you post your cover letter as an example?

  51. Take on small consulting jobs, even if they don’t pay much or last very long. It can be a good way to get your foot in the door and expand your portfolio.

    Last time I got laid off, my small consulting job turned into the full-time job I have now.

  52. Take on small consulting jobs, even if they don’t pay much or last very long. It can be a good way to get your foot in the door and expand your portfolio.

    Last time I got laid off, my small consulting job turned into the full-time job I have now.

  53. I’ve been laid off twice now and taken the opportunity each time to change direction.
    In both cases I treated it as a positive and refreshing challenge and didn’t take it personally (in the first case we were acquired and lost 30% headcount, in the second the company folded). I tried freelance for a while but am now back in a real company and loving it.
    Wouldn’t like to go through it again at this point in time (for various personal and financial reasons) but as long as you stay positive the results are positive.

    My motivator – track the positives and learn from the negatives

  54. I’ve been laid off twice now and taken the opportunity each time to change direction.
    In both cases I treated it as a positive and refreshing challenge and didn’t take it personally (in the first case we were acquired and lost 30% headcount, in the second the company folded). I tried freelance for a while but am now back in a real company and loving it.
    Wouldn’t like to go through it again at this point in time (for various personal and financial reasons) but as long as you stay positive the results are positive.

    My motivator – track the positives and learn from the negatives


  55. look – there is some 18 year old kid who is just going to finish high school in the midst of whatever recession is coming and then he will make millions. Not only that…he is one of many – PLUS there will be a LOT of people who know how to make lemonade when it’s raining lemons.

    You dumb asses who overextended your credit cards & mortgages during the good times ALL deserver to loose your jobs, homes AND families. You’re idiots who should have had your mom or dad or wife or husband hit you in the head with a lead pipe and taught you how to NOT BE CONSUMERS ALL THE F’ing time.

    All you people out there who want to have a JOB (just over broke) and have a guaranteed paycheck should have worked for the government or some union and started A LONG TIME AGO…then you would have had your cake and be eating it too for $40,000 a year.

    Anyone who says – go to elance, freelance, jack in the pants is an IDIOT…all the russians, chinese, indians (from india) with MORE experience than you work on projects for NEXT TO NOTHING. How are you planning to pay your mortgage on 10 projects a month *(if you can do that many) that only pay $250 each?

    I use these sites ALL the time because I can get great work done for next to nothing. I can’t wait for this recession to kick in because now I’ll be able to hire all you losers for NEXT TO NOTHING because you’ll all underbid each other for table scraps.

    These sites are LOADED with people who are way more educated than all you dumb ass schmucks who sat around the water cooler talking about your “real estate wealth” while they scratched by on $5/hr in whatever-foriegn-land they are living in.

    $2.50 an hour is coming and all you fake ass techno wanna be programmer IT folks are getting cleaned out of the industry…AGAIN – wahahahahaha.

    I’ve done this type of work for over 20 years – good and bad times. Ups and Downs don’t affect me because

    1) I have a masters in Computer Science from a REAL UNIVERISTY – not some java ass crap it technical school diploma from devry

    2) I write programs – REAL CODE that does REAL things for REAL businesses that make REAL money (in good times and bad) – not make websites or re-crop pretty pictures for businesses that are selling the latest fad (haha you retards in the mortgage brokerage business) or the latest gizmos (who the hell is going to buy a flat screen for $2k when that will cover you r food bills for about a year?)

    3) I make things that people NEED – not WANT or would like to have

    4) I’m not a 40 year old middle management Project Manager with a PMI – I have CURRENT and USABLE skills.

    Like my Dad use to say – never be to proud to PICK UP THE F’ING SHOVEL and DIG THE DITCH.

    5) I make USABLE applications in my spare time and SELL THEM ALREADY to thousands of people

    6) I already have recurring revenue from CONSUMERS

    7) I SAVED MONEY – invested it, sold my companies, sold my house to some dumb ass for $950,000 when I only paid $175,00 for it.

    8) I DIDN’T ride my credit cards like a $3 dollar Wh-re – hell if you can’t pay cash for it maybe MAYBE you shouldn’t have bought it.

    9) I didn’t buy a $600,000 home on a $50,000 salary
    just like the dumb ass I know who lived at home with mommy until they were 35, drove a $50,000 hummer, then went out and bought an “investment” and now is living back at home BANKRUPT – what a moronic idiot.

    10) I don’t send out a resume either – think you are the only one sending out your resume? guess again bonehead – thousands of other OVERQUALIFIED UNDER WORKED OVERSTRESSED 30 – 50 year olds JUST like you are going down because they thought all the good times would last forever.

    If you’re the best at what you do – there is not a lot of competition for it then – you’re not in line at the soup kitchen.

    Get a life folks – most of you who will lose your jobs were in an industry you didn’t really care about, were not passionate about, got into because it was something to do and now your whining and crying because the reality is – the market is cleaning out the crud just like a wild fire.

    Us old oaks will weather this storm and come back AGAIN and laugh at all you punk asses who thought – hmm let me get in on the gold rush.

    wahahahahahahahaha – in yer face losers (again for the 3rd time)

  56. Use a search engine for jobs. This lets you search millions of jobs from thousands of websites simultaneously and instantly with a single search!

    You can then use the time this saves you in your online job search to do all the other things itemized so well in this post.

  57. Use a search engine for jobs. This lets you search millions of jobs from thousands of websites simultaneously and instantly with a single search!

    You can then use the time this saves you in your online job search to do all the other things itemized so well in this post.

  58. it’s rare that a layoff ruins one’s career. i’ve seen many instances left the employee better off in the long run. layoffs are a bit like shuffle of the deck in the tech industry. when the jobs do come back, they turn out to be more interesting and more mission-critical than the job that got cut. that’s always turns out to be a better option.

  59. it’s rare that a layoff ruins one’s career. i’ve seen many instances left the employee better off in the long run. layoffs are a bit like shuffle of the deck in the tech industry. when the jobs do come back, they turn out to be more interesting and more mission-critical than the job that got cut. that’s always turns out to be a better option.

  60. Only thing I can add is look into the state employment commission. They have job training.
    Also, consider job searching an exercise in numbers. Out of 100 resumes sent out, you get 10 interviews and from those 10 interviews you will get 1 offer. To improve the odds, stay busy. Get the 9 interviews out of the way fast.

  61. Only thing I can add is look into the state employment commission. They have job training.
    Also, consider job searching an exercise in numbers. Out of 100 resumes sent out, you get 10 interviews and from those 10 interviews you will get 1 offer. To improve the odds, stay busy. Get the 9 interviews out of the way fast.

  62. Good stuff. I am not in technology but I think your tips obviously apply across all types of jobs. Thanks!

  63. Good stuff. I am not in technology but I think your tips obviously apply across all types of jobs. Thanks!

  64. Then again, if you have the money and the time, are single with no commitments, take a couple of years out and go travelling around the world.

    At the end of the road, say when you’re 85, you’ll treasure the memories much more than the extra money you’ll have made.

  65. Then again, if you have the money and the time, are single with no commitments, take a couple of years out and go travelling around the world.

    At the end of the road, say when you’re 85, you’ll treasure the memories much more than the extra money you’ll have made.

  66. All good advice, but several of the comments indicate poor writing/typing/grammar skills. While you might just get someone to write your resume for you, you still have to demonstrate an ability to communicate during the interview. As an interviewer I would have always found some way to gracefully dismiss those with communications issues. This is not a foreign language issue as many immigrants have better English language skills than native Americans.

    I don’t think Yahoo is a good poster child for your headline though. Yahoo, and several other tech companies have their own unique problems with performance that have nothing to do with recession, but more too do with continued bad management.

    If we are in fact at the beginning of a recession (which is still questionable) the factors driving it will be the housing bubble, and the fact that an upcoming potential change in leadership (as in 2000) gives a lot of people incentives to talk the economy down. So some of this recession will magically correct itself right after the November elections, other parts will take longer.

    If we are in fact also experiencing a tech bubble-burst, it may in fact be a continuation of what happened in 2000 which is I think a VERY healthy shift away from everyone’s desktop being treated as an independent “data-center”. Businesses should be able to get by with far fewer “administrators” than they use today, and home users should not have to learn the details of how a PC operates in order to do ordinary tasks. Web (meaningless number) technology will continue to move toward big server farms that will support appliance-like devices at home (or in the office) that are cheap enough to be thrown away when they stop booting (failure to boot being a very rare event). It’s fairly easy to see which companies are helping this process along versus companies that are fighting it all the way. Don’t underestimate Wall Street’s ability to pick the eventual winners and losers.

  67. All good advice, but several of the comments indicate poor writing/typing/grammar skills. While you might just get someone to write your resume for you, you still have to demonstrate an ability to communicate during the interview. As an interviewer I would have always found some way to gracefully dismiss those with communications issues. This is not a foreign language issue as many immigrants have better English language skills than native Americans.

    I don’t think Yahoo is a good poster child for your headline though. Yahoo, and several other tech companies have their own unique problems with performance that have nothing to do with recession, but more too do with continued bad management.

    If we are in fact at the beginning of a recession (which is still questionable) the factors driving it will be the housing bubble, and the fact that an upcoming potential change in leadership (as in 2000) gives a lot of people incentives to talk the economy down. So some of this recession will magically correct itself right after the November elections, other parts will take longer.

    If we are in fact also experiencing a tech bubble-burst, it may in fact be a continuation of what happened in 2000 which is I think a VERY healthy shift away from everyone’s desktop being treated as an independent “data-center”. Businesses should be able to get by with far fewer “administrators” than they use today, and home users should not have to learn the details of how a PC operates in order to do ordinary tasks. Web (meaningless number) technology will continue to move toward big server farms that will support appliance-like devices at home (or in the office) that are cheap enough to be thrown away when they stop booting (failure to boot being a very rare event). It’s fairly easy to see which companies are helping this process along versus companies that are fighting it all the way. Don’t underestimate Wall Street’s ability to pick the eventual winners and losers.

  68. Excellent advice, Robert, but there’s one problem…there is no recession. It’s leftist propaganda. A recession is six months negative growth. That hasn’t happened and there is no indication it will.

    Tech is about optimism. Old media talks down the economy at election time. We shouldn’t join in.

  69. Excellent advice, Robert, but there’s one problem…there is no recession. It’s leftist propaganda. A recession is six months negative growth. That hasn’t happened and there is no indication it will.

    Tech is about optimism. Old media talks down the economy at election time. We shouldn’t join in.

  70. A very good post indeed. Layoffs are not pretty not to mention demoralizing. I think it’s important to stay positive (easier said than done) in order to tackle some of the points you mention.

  71. A very good post indeed. Layoffs are not pretty not to mention demoralizing. I think it’s important to stay positive (easier said than done) in order to tackle some of the points you mention.

  72. Something I found effective was using the free version of salesforce.com and managing my list of job prospects in the same way you manage a sales funnel (Highrise also has a free version that’s really usable…I just like the sales focus that underlies salesforce). Not only did this provide me with a framework that kept things from falling through the cracks, it also helped to keep me thinking of my job search as a job in and of itself. This kept me from getting down and I also felt a lot more prepared/professional in my outreach efforts.

  73. Something I found effective was using the free version of salesforce.com and managing my list of job prospects in the same way you manage a sales funnel (Highrise also has a free version that’s really usable…I just like the sales focus that underlies salesforce). Not only did this provide me with a framework that kept things from falling through the cracks, it also helped to keep me thinking of my job search as a job in and of itself. This kept me from getting down and I also felt a lot more prepared/professional in my outreach efforts.

  74. I laid myself off from a job in journalism on Nov. 1, 2007. Luckily, my husband, also in the business, saved our money for years knowing how you’re only a day away from the bread line if a new owner doesn’t like your looks. One thing I have learned, if you aren’t working you have more time to save money. By not working, I’ve saved on clothing, gas, car maintenance, insurance costs and of course parking. Plus, I now have time to recylce, walk to the grocer, and walk my dog. Not to mention, doing my own housework, laundry and gardening.

  75. Neal and others regarding recession. You are right. We are NOT technically in a recession. But all the nobel winning economists (five of them) I listened to tonight said we are definitely in economic turmoil and some are leaning toward recession. CNN has been interviewing lots of CEOs and other VIPs and they are overwhelmingly leaning to recession. That is HARDLY a group of left wingers.

  76. I laid myself off from a job in journalism on Nov. 1, 2007. Luckily, my husband, also in the business, saved our money for years knowing how you’re only a day away from the bread line if a new owner doesn’t like your looks. One thing I have learned, if you aren’t working you have more time to save money. By not working, I’ve saved on clothing, gas, car maintenance, insurance costs and of course parking. Plus, I now have time to recylce, walk to the grocer, and walk my dog. Not to mention, doing my own housework, laundry and gardening.

  77. Neal and others regarding recession. You are right. We are NOT technically in a recession. But all the nobel winning economists (five of them) I listened to tonight said we are definitely in economic turmoil and some are leaning toward recession. CNN has been interviewing lots of CEOs and other VIPs and they are overwhelmingly leaning to recession. That is HARDLY a group of left wingers.

  78. Many CEOs have a vested interest in predicting a recession – it’s their way of gettting breaks from the government to make their lives easier and to justify why their businesses are underperforming.

  79. Many CEOs have a vested interest in predicting a recession – it’s their way of gettting breaks from the government to make their lives easier and to justify why their businesses are underperforming.

  80. Bob,
    We are not in a recession regardless of what you hear on TV. The media (get this) is biased to present extreme versions of the truth (shocking!). They wouldn’t be able to make much hay with the story of “US in Flat Growth Mode!”. So they default to putting a bunch of talking heads on TV screaming about the recession we’re in. Even though we’re not.
    Please step out of the echo chamber and acknowledge reality.

  81. What recession? Robert these were the first words out of your mouth when we ran into each other briefly at Macworld. It kind of surprised me. I just dont agree we have anything to worry about other than a little lull. However if capital gains and other income tax rates go up in 2009 (that affect investors’ wallets…that WILL cause a recession.

    For now, in early 2008, there are a lot of folks that are seemingly “hoping” for a recession. Is thispolitically driven? I don’t know but kinda seems like it. Oil prices are high, yes, and the housing market got shit hammered by the mortgage industry crisis…not great but hardly a recession. Yahoo is trying to impress shareholders and focus their efforts, fine, those folks will have no problem finding work. In Portland it is still hard to find solid, experienced high tech empployees in all areas. Office vacancy here is low, low, low and businesses are buying software products in all areas. Though I am no longer at Attensa the pipeline is impressive and bulging…No recession there or foreseen. All analysts agree it is ramping up, not down.

    All of that said, your post has some great tips if someone finds themselves looking for work. Also, if one finds themself at “no business model web 2.0, bubble 2.0″ kind of company – they SHOULD worry. There are a lot of those in the bay area and google/yahoo can’t buy them all…

  82. Bob,
    We are not in a recession regardless of what you hear on TV. The media (get this) is biased to present extreme versions of the truth (shocking!). They wouldn’t be able to make much hay with the story of “US in Flat Growth Mode!”. So they default to putting a bunch of talking heads on TV screaming about the recession we’re in. Even though we’re not.
    Please step out of the echo chamber and acknowledge reality.

  83. What recession? Robert these were the first words out of your mouth when we ran into each other briefly at Macworld. It kind of surprised me. I just dont agree we have anything to worry about other than a little lull. However if capital gains and other income tax rates go up in 2009 (that affect investors’ wallets…that WILL cause a recession.

    For now, in early 2008, there are a lot of folks that are seemingly “hoping” for a recession. Is thispolitically driven? I don’t know but kinda seems like it. Oil prices are high, yes, and the housing market got shit hammered by the mortgage industry crisis…not great but hardly a recession. Yahoo is trying to impress shareholders and focus their efforts, fine, those folks will have no problem finding work. In Portland it is still hard to find solid, experienced high tech empployees in all areas. Office vacancy here is low, low, low and businesses are buying software products in all areas. Though I am no longer at Attensa the pipeline is impressive and bulging…No recession there or foreseen. All analysts agree it is ramping up, not down.

    All of that said, your post has some great tips if someone finds themselves looking for work. Also, if one finds themself at “no business model web 2.0, bubble 2.0″ kind of company – they SHOULD worry. There are a lot of those in the bay area and google/yahoo can’t buy them all…

  84. Dennis — hmmm, I did NOT cause the stock market to take a pretty sizeable slide in the past couple of weeks. Go look at any stock chart. Every single tech stock is off, some by a sizeable amount. You can stick your head in the sand but we are in the middle of a downturn at minimum. Recession? OK, I’ll let you have another quarter to figure it out.

    Oh, and the dollar sucks overseas. Wait until the American consumer starts getting hit with inflation that inevitably is coming. Oh no. 2. Is not oil still hanging around $100?

    If our economy is so healthy why did the Fed give us a huge rate cut? Why is Bush trying to pass tax inventives to jump start the economy?

    Yeah, all those guys listen to me. Bbbwwwaaahhhaaahhaaaa!

  85. Dennis — hmmm, I did NOT cause the stock market to take a pretty sizeable slide in the past couple of weeks. Go look at any stock chart. Every single tech stock is off, some by a sizeable amount. You can stick your head in the sand but we are in the middle of a downturn at minimum. Recession? OK, I’ll let you have another quarter to figure it out.

    Oh, and the dollar sucks overseas. Wait until the American consumer starts getting hit with inflation that inevitably is coming. Oh no. 2. Is not oil still hanging around $100?

    If our economy is so healthy why did the Fed give us a huge rate cut? Why is Bush trying to pass tax inventives to jump start the economy?

    Yeah, all those guys listen to me. Bbbwwwaaahhhaaahhaaaa!

  86. You’re part of the problem today.

    Recession is defined by 6 months or perhaps even 3 months of negative growth (aka a loss) in the GDP. We’ve not had a single month. So stocks are down. So Yahoo laid off a bunch of people. So the mortgage industry is in shambles. This does not mean we’re in recession just because the weather is bad. The more you and FOX and NBC throw around this term, the more people get scared with their money. The more they feel like ALL aspects of the economy are going down the crapper. Then they don’t spend money, they sell their stocks, they downsize a department in preparation. And then guess what… we really ARE in a recession. It’s true that it would be very hard for media (both independent and large) to cause a recession… but they sure can fan the flame of hysteria.

    Today, you are being part of the problem. dang.

  87. You’re part of the problem today.

    Recession is defined by 6 months or perhaps even 3 months of negative growth (aka a loss) in the GDP. We’ve not had a single month. So stocks are down. So Yahoo laid off a bunch of people. So the mortgage industry is in shambles. This does not mean we’re in recession just because the weather is bad. The more you and FOX and NBC throw around this term, the more people get scared with their money. The more they feel like ALL aspects of the economy are going down the crapper. Then they don’t spend money, they sell their stocks, they downsize a department in preparation. And then guess what… we really ARE in a recession. It’s true that it would be very hard for media (both independent and large) to cause a recession… but they sure can fan the flame of hysteria.

    Today, you are being part of the problem. dang.

  88. Jeremy — OK, I cry uncle. Everything is hunky dory. The economists are all wrong. Everything is going fine. Ignore all the news. Nothing bad in the economy is happening. Everyone should just stay happy.

    Make you feel better?

  89. Jeremy — OK, I cry uncle. Everything is hunky dory. The economists are all wrong. Everything is going fine. Ignore all the news. Nothing bad in the economy is happening. Everyone should just stay happy.

    Make you feel better?

  90. I suppose I’m just tired of bloggers/newscasters dropping the “R” bomb to sell a few commercials or get a few reads. Bird flu, mad cow disease, Y2k, the “2008 recession”, etc. It’s all playing on fear and ignorance.

  91. I suppose I’m just tired of bloggers/newscasters dropping the “R” bomb to sell a few commercials or get a few reads. Bird flu, mad cow disease, Y2k, the “2008 recession”, etc. It’s all playing on fear and ignorance.

  92. links for 2008-01-24

    Vorselektion von A-Blogs über Rivva – KoopTech
    (tags: icommented)

    Basic Thinking Blog | back
    23andme.com: genetik und Datenschutz.
    (tags: icommented)

    MarketingWelten 1-2-3.0 » Gutes Design ist auch gute Kommunikation
    - gutes …

  93. I got laid off three weeks ago, and while these tips are great ones, I live in an area that has almost no IT jobs. I’ve put in for almost every IT job I could find. I’ve scoured craigslist, Monster, Careerbuilder, Dice, you name it — no joy. I’m beginning to think I might end up working some horrible service sector job.

    I have a degree and ten years of IT experience. The nearest big city is an 1 1/2 hours away, and with the price of gas over $3, I cannot afford to drive that far on a daily basis.

    Anyone have any tips for areas that don’t have a lot of IT jobs?

    Everyday I look at the papers, job sites, government sites, etc. Nothing out there for me in this area. I cannot afford to move at this point in time.

  94. I got laid off three weeks ago, and while these tips are great ones, I live in an area that has almost no IT jobs. I’ve put in for almost every IT job I could find. I’ve scoured craigslist, Monster, Careerbuilder, Dice, you name it — no joy. I’m beginning to think I might end up working some horrible service sector job.

    I have a degree and ten years of IT experience. The nearest big city is an 1 1/2 hours away, and with the price of gas over $3, I cannot afford to drive that far on a daily basis.

    Anyone have any tips for areas that don’t have a lot of IT jobs?

    Everyday I look at the papers, job sites, government sites, etc. Nothing out there for me in this area. I cannot afford to move at this point in time.

  95. Thanks Robert. Hey Jeremy, isn’t fear what drives the markets down? If the fear last long enough, it’s a recession. Things have been crap on and off since shortly after W took office. This administration is based on fear and they are the ones making money. It’s not ignorance, it’s pragmatic reality. Recession will come, and employers will justify paying lower wages and taking larger profits. This is what W wanted from the beginning. It’s all part of the plan… :)

  96. Thanks Robert. Hey Jeremy, isn’t fear what drives the markets down? If the fear last long enough, it’s a recession. Things have been crap on and off since shortly after W took office. This administration is based on fear and they are the ones making money. It’s not ignorance, it’s pragmatic reality. Recession will come, and employers will justify paying lower wages and taking larger profits. This is what W wanted from the beginning. It’s all part of the plan… :)

  97. hi scoble, want to say thank you for posting about this because it gave me the courage to start my own blog about geting a job and the web site is “thefoxreport.tumblr.com” if there is any way you can promote my blog it wood mean a lot to me thank’s

  98. hi scoble, want to say thank you for posting about this because it gave me the courage to start my own blog about geting a job and the web site is “thefoxreport.tumblr.com” if there is any way you can promote my blog it wood mean a lot to me thank’s

  99. I love the fact that you write about recession tips from a conference you’re covering for the rest of us, and your [excellent] post generates 75 comments within the first 18 hours.

    That’s the difference in the world today – people can hear it through you: five Nobel economists weighing in, and you’re translating… which causes a discussion and more tips.

    In our globally-interconnected world, we have a lot to learn from each other. Thank you for sparking the conversation, Robert. Here’s to you.

  100. I love the fact that you write about recession tips from a conference you’re covering for the rest of us, and your [excellent] post generates 75 comments within the first 18 hours.

    That’s the difference in the world today – people can hear it through you: five Nobel economists weighing in, and you’re translating… which causes a discussion and more tips.

    In our globally-interconnected world, we have a lot to learn from each other. Thank you for sparking the conversation, Robert. Here’s to you.

  101. I went through a rough time and had to rebuild my life, which I did in San Francisco. I now work for a law firm as their bookkeeper, even though that was not my original line of work. A good cover letter and resume was essential. But also important was finding food and shelter during the hard times. So I wrote a booklet telling people where to find help in San Francisco. You can see it at http://www.sanfranciscohelps.com and http://sanfranciscohelps.blogspot.com

    Good luck with your future!

  102. I went through a rough time and had to rebuild my life, which I did in San Francisco. I now work for a law firm as their bookkeeper, even though that was not my original line of work. A good cover letter and resume was essential. But also important was finding food and shelter during the hard times. So I wrote a booklet telling people where to find help in San Francisco. You can see it at http://www.sanfranciscohelps.com and http://sanfranciscohelps.blogspot.com

    Good luck with your future!

  103. Great post, Robert! I’ve had similar experiences, and your advice is spot-on.

    I’ll just reiterate the importance of quantity over quality initially. You can be choosy once you have five different job offers.

  104. Great post, Robert! I’ve had similar experiences, and your advice is spot-on.

    I’ll just reiterate the importance of quantity over quality initially. You can be choosy once you have five different job offers.

  105. A blog which illustrates your unique mix of Tech, ecommerce and people skills may be an attractor factor for a future employer and/or become a viable sideline.
    Works for me ;-)

    The Japanese property bubble was a long time unwinding – I came here in ’94 thinking the worst was over lol.
    I wonder if the US will ‘snap’ out of theirs a lot faster…
    Anyway, here’s George Soros in yesterday’s FT.com with “The worst market crisis in 60 years”.
    Hedging his bets again?
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/24f73610-c91e-11dc-9807-000077b07658.html

    regards
    mark mcclure
    tokyo

  106. A blog which illustrates your unique mix of Tech, ecommerce and people skills may be an attractor factor for a future employer and/or become a viable sideline.
    Works for me ;-)

    The Japanese property bubble was a long time unwinding – I came here in ’94 thinking the worst was over lol.
    I wonder if the US will ‘snap’ out of theirs a lot faster…
    Anyway, here’s George Soros in yesterday’s FT.com with “The worst market crisis in 60 years”.
    Hedging his bets again?
    http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/24f73610-c91e-11dc-9807-000077b07658.html

    regards
    mark mcclure
    tokyo

  107. Lots of great points — relevant even for us consulting types for the inevitable slow periods. Reminded me of advice about networking that I think is vitally important for those who are self-employed (and I don’t think it’s a stretch to figure out how it would apply even to those employed): the best time to network is when you’re busy because that’s when you’re most up-beat about your skills, you can talk about the fascinating things you’re doing, etc.

    I think the message underlying that is to do your best to put your best foot forward when you network (or interview) — being up-beat and positive about your skills and your future is key! (Though, admittedly, not always easy…)

  108. Lots of great points — relevant even for us consulting types for the inevitable slow periods. Reminded me of advice about networking that I think is vitally important for those who are self-employed (and I don’t think it’s a stretch to figure out how it would apply even to those employed): the best time to network is when you’re busy because that’s when you’re most up-beat about your skills, you can talk about the fascinating things you’re doing, etc.

    I think the message underlying that is to do your best to put your best foot forward when you network (or interview) — being up-beat and positive about your skills and your future is key! (Though, admittedly, not always easy…)

  109. It’s About Finding A Job In Downturn Times

    Robert Scoble has posted a very long article on how to find a job during recession. Worth reading, provided the current situation in the Global Economy. Here are a couple of my favorites, based on my own experience back in

  110. Unfortunately, techie circles still romanticize tech when it is largely not deserving.

    Romanticization is fine if you work for Apple an evangelist, or you’re like Robert, and literally hang out with industry luninaries all the time, but for most of us, it’s actual drudgery.

    There is nothing romatic about running ethernet for a living, working as a computer technician, or being in Internet security. I know, I’ve done all three.

    Tech people cannot seem to let go of the last vestiges of when things were really good before the dotcom crash. I, too, miss the three-hour lunches, the foosball tables, and the high pay, but it’s now down to brass tacks and just making a living.

    What no one mentioned here is outsourcing/offshoring. In my area, where there are precious few tech jobs available, the rest are offshored to third-world hell holes to people who will work for less a year than illegal immigrants. I cannot afford to move to those areas where there are tech jobs in abundance, so I’m becoming frustrated with the system. It seems to me that American companies are more concerned with profits than with the people that help them earn those huge profits.

    Fact is, it’s hard to get a job in tech. I know. I hav ea degree and ten years of experience, but things are getting bad for techies unless you either know someone or you get lucky.

  111. Unfortunately, techie circles still romanticize tech when it is largely not deserving.

    Romanticization is fine if you work for Apple an evangelist, or you’re like Robert, and literally hang out with industry luninaries all the time, but for most of us, it’s actual drudgery.

    There is nothing romatic about running ethernet for a living, working as a computer technician, or being in Internet security. I know, I’ve done all three.

    Tech people cannot seem to let go of the last vestiges of when things were really good before the dotcom crash. I, too, miss the three-hour lunches, the foosball tables, and the high pay, but it’s now down to brass tacks and just making a living.

    What no one mentioned here is outsourcing/offshoring. In my area, where there are precious few tech jobs available, the rest are offshored to third-world hell holes to people who will work for less a year than illegal immigrants. I cannot afford to move to those areas where there are tech jobs in abundance, so I’m becoming frustrated with the system. It seems to me that American companies are more concerned with profits than with the people that help them earn those huge profits.

    Fact is, it’s hard to get a job in tech. I know. I hav ea degree and ten years of experience, but things are getting bad for techies unless you either know someone or you get lucky.

  112. I was laid off in October. Here’s my advice.

    Day 1: Shock, no matter how prepared you were for it. Cut yourself some slack and do NOT burn any bridges.

    Day 2: Mourning. You have friends you won’t see everyday. People have called you, and they are sympathetic and sad. Don’t be afraid to grieve the loss. Don’t be surprised if you can’t help it.

    Day 3: It’s showtime. Get organized. Lists of contacts and business cards. Doesn’t matter how well you know them, whether they’ll remember you, whether you’re sure their information is current, or anything. This is a volume exercise. If you’ve got their card, you’ve met. If you’ve met, you owe it to them to provide updated contact information.

    Day 4: Start sending emails. Break your contact list into logical groups. For me, it was simple; their were insurance carriers, vendors, and TPAs. Come up with a form email for each; I am no longer with xxx, I can now be reached at yyy, I can help you with zzz, and if I can ever be of assistance please give me a call or email. Start emailing alphabetically.

    Day 5: If you spent all day yesterday emailing people, chances are you heard from somebody… start a conversation. Ask them if they know anyone who’s looking for somebody. At this point, you’re pretty much on your own; things will take on a life of their own at this point. Some people will ask for a resume. Others will offer to be a reference. Others will recommend a recruiter or two. Still others will offer to make an introduction to someone else. Say yes to everybody, and say thank you to everybody.

    Above all, until you receive and accept an offer, do not stop looking. You must have no guilt right now about your open-mindedness. Until somebody signs on the dotted line, you’re a free agent.

    …and for what it’s worth, I’m not convinced we’re entering a recession. I think we may be entering a period of slower growth, but I think those who believe that the sky is falling are going to look pretty silly in a year or so. And this is coming from a guy who’s just coming off being unemployed for three months! So for crying out loud, keep your chins up, everybody!

  113. I was laid off in October. Here’s my advice.

    Day 1: Shock, no matter how prepared you were for it. Cut yourself some slack and do NOT burn any bridges.

    Day 2: Mourning. You have friends you won’t see everyday. People have called you, and they are sympathetic and sad. Don’t be afraid to grieve the loss. Don’t be surprised if you can’t help it.

    Day 3: It’s showtime. Get organized. Lists of contacts and business cards. Doesn’t matter how well you know them, whether they’ll remember you, whether you’re sure their information is current, or anything. This is a volume exercise. If you’ve got their card, you’ve met. If you’ve met, you owe it to them to provide updated contact information.

    Day 4: Start sending emails. Break your contact list into logical groups. For me, it was simple; their were insurance carriers, vendors, and TPAs. Come up with a form email for each; I am no longer with xxx, I can now be reached at yyy, I can help you with zzz, and if I can ever be of assistance please give me a call or email. Start emailing alphabetically.

    Day 5: If you spent all day yesterday emailing people, chances are you heard from somebody… start a conversation. Ask them if they know anyone who’s looking for somebody. At this point, you’re pretty much on your own; things will take on a life of their own at this point. Some people will ask for a resume. Others will offer to be a reference. Others will recommend a recruiter or two. Still others will offer to make an introduction to someone else. Say yes to everybody, and say thank you to everybody.

    Above all, until you receive and accept an offer, do not stop looking. You must have no guilt right now about your open-mindedness. Until somebody signs on the dotted line, you’re a free agent.

    …and for what it’s worth, I’m not convinced we’re entering a recession. I think we may be entering a period of slower growth, but I think those who believe that the sky is falling are going to look pretty silly in a year or so. And this is coming from a guy who’s just coming off being unemployed for three months! So for crying out loud, keep your chins up, everybody!

  114. Laid -off and being jobless wasn’t so bad except when i looked at my wife. And I thought to myself, “Does anybody really mean what they say when they recite those wedding vows?”

  115. Laid -off and being jobless wasn’t so bad except when i looked at my wife. And I thought to myself, “Does anybody really mean what they say when they recite those wedding vows?”

  116. Good stuff, sir. A couple of years back I was helping several friends who were job-hunting; my experiences with them (and with my own job hunts) led me to post three entries about it on my personal blog, starting here. Some of what I say echoes what you’ve said here.

    Since I wrote those posts, I’ve had many occasions to point other friends to this advice, and folks have told me that the series is a useful starting point.

    The main, main, main thing, from my perspective, is to fight cynicism. I start the series by saying “It’s not over until you win.” I believe that having that attitude is as important as anything else you can do when you’ve lost your job.

  117. Good stuff, sir. A couple of years back I was helping several friends who were job-hunting; my experiences with them (and with my own job hunts) led me to post three entries about it on my personal blog, starting here. Some of what I say echoes what you’ve said here.

    Since I wrote those posts, I’ve had many occasions to point other friends to this advice, and folks have told me that the series is a useful starting point.

    The main, main, main thing, from my perspective, is to fight cynicism. I start the series by saying “It’s not over until you win.” I believe that having that attitude is as important as anything else you can do when you’ve lost your job.

  118. I will never worry too much about getting lay off at all from my day job because of recession, as the government should not allow that to happen to easily.

    Colin Joss
    East Lothian, Haddington
    United Kingdom

  119. I will never worry too much about getting lay off at all from my day job because of recession, as the government should not allow that to happen to easily.

    Colin Joss
    East Lothian, Haddington
    United Kingdom

  120. @ 102 Keith,

    Great advice. I learned something new. Always a good thing.

    Something I think may be a problem with me is that I’ve had six jobs in eith years. Granted, this is/was somewhat normal with tech jobs. The area in which I now live is somewhat different in how they look at things. Most people here stay at the same job for years. Even the service sector jobs here are that way. I’ve noticed quite a few people here at my local Wal-Mart that have 20-Year service stickers on the name tags. I couldn’t imagine staying with one job for that long a time. Perhaps it’s because I’m a techie. Anyone have an idea on how I could cope with the potential questions I may get? I often think I receive no responses to my emails because my resume has so many jobs in a short amount of time. Makes me wish I would have gotten my degree in Astrophysics or something where I could have a cushy university or research job with tenure and one that cannot be sent offshore.

  121. @ 102 Keith,

    Great advice. I learned something new. Always a good thing.

    Something I think may be a problem with me is that I’ve had six jobs in eith years. Granted, this is/was somewhat normal with tech jobs. The area in which I now live is somewhat different in how they look at things. Most people here stay at the same job for years. Even the service sector jobs here are that way. I’ve noticed quite a few people here at my local Wal-Mart that have 20-Year service stickers on the name tags. I couldn’t imagine staying with one job for that long a time. Perhaps it’s because I’m a techie. Anyone have an idea on how I could cope with the potential questions I may get? I often think I receive no responses to my emails because my resume has so many jobs in a short amount of time. Makes me wish I would have gotten my degree in Astrophysics or something where I could have a cushy university or research job with tenure and one that cannot be sent offshore.

  122. Recessions are caused from over regulation and printing too much paper money. A hippie dreaming positive thought will not prevent a recession nor will it prevent a drought when there is no rain.
    Those of you with the luck of the draw will consider yourselves to be better than the rest.
    The housing bubble and the coming tech employment bubble are just a cycle of supply and demand.
    The next 5 years, demand will continue to drop.
    The best advice is to put 30% into savings each year when your working, keep applying for work, realize that any company will lay off a tech in a heartbeat.
    More important, what will you do when the tech market is so over supplied that your best salary will be half or a third of what it is now?
    Years ago, I worked in electronics for top dollar. As it became automated, I had to adapt.
    You think that your tech job can’t become automated?
    Every company that sells technology is promising your CEO that it takes less people to install and maintain. That is the way it works.
    I am enjoying my programming and DB work while it last. But, 2008 ain’t nothing like it was back in 1999.
    And 1999 was nothing like it was back in 1973.

  123. Recessions are caused from over regulation and printing too much paper money. A hippie dreaming positive thought will not prevent a recession nor will it prevent a drought when there is no rain.
    Those of you with the luck of the draw will consider yourselves to be better than the rest.
    The housing bubble and the coming tech employment bubble are just a cycle of supply and demand.
    The next 5 years, demand will continue to drop.
    The best advice is to put 30% into savings each year when your working, keep applying for work, realize that any company will lay off a tech in a heartbeat.
    More important, what will you do when the tech market is so over supplied that your best salary will be half or a third of what it is now?
    Years ago, I worked in electronics for top dollar. As it became automated, I had to adapt.
    You think that your tech job can’t become automated?
    Every company that sells technology is promising your CEO that it takes less people to install and maintain. That is the way it works.
    I am enjoying my programming and DB work while it last. But, 2008 ain’t nothing like it was back in 1999.
    And 1999 was nothing like it was back in 1973.

  124. [...] What to do if you’re laid off in 2008 recession « Scobleizer — Tech geek blogger This quote is odd, you risk becoming like the office guy who was fired and did not knew it or did not wanted to recognize it. “See if you can keep coming into the office. This isn’t open to everyone, but at Userland I kept coming into work everyday afte (tags: networking productivity career jobs advice business) [...]

  125. All these are the guidelines that one need to consider why being sacked… While you are developing your career, make sure your CV doesn’t contain many companies name in short duration… Which will help you while days are not going good like 2K2.

  126. All these are the guidelines that one need to consider why being sacked… While you are developing your career, make sure your CV doesn’t contain many companies name in short duration… Which will help you while days are not going good like 2K2.

  127. Good article, given the fact that I am another of those survivor who have seen the past recession and the tough times it had to offer.

    My 2 cents; product companies are a better bet than services companies in such situations.

    Try to have an alternate source of income before the recession hits you, there are so many ways to make money right now.

  128. Good article, given the fact that I am another of those survivor who have seen the past recession and the tough times it had to offer.

    My 2 cents; product companies are a better bet than services companies in such situations.

    Try to have an alternate source of income before the recession hits you, there are so many ways to make money right now.

  129. To a great group of people !!!!
    What a helpful advice that I hope one will never need .
    We all know that statement most likely will not come true.
    Sooner or later the loss of job will occur and it is never welcome.
    I am not in tech but I sure do use it . I saw the value many many years ago.
    I am in my 3rd career and soon to move to a 4th . Each one has been
    I very big change . Military , Food retail, for the past 22yrs real estate
    and next the 4th managing our IRA acct.
    In real estate I consider myself out of work after I close a home or should lose the listing. So laid off to me occurs often . I am always looking for work and now with this current r/e market. One must reinvent how to help buyers and sellers get through this awful mess. I have never been an order taker .I have always worked hard to get to closing. Focus on service and not your self, pay it forward and remember nothing is easy— work is work !
    Thanks for all of you and your posts of helpful advise. Just think we may have assisted someone that got the new job !!!!! What joy that would be to them and their family !!!!!!!
    Dave Bigos

  130. To a great group of people !!!!
    What a helpful advice that I hope one will never need .
    We all know that statement most likely will not come true.
    Sooner or later the loss of job will occur and it is never welcome.
    I am not in tech but I sure do use it . I saw the value many many years ago.
    I am in my 3rd career and soon to move to a 4th . Each one has been
    I very big change . Military , Food retail, for the past 22yrs real estate
    and next the 4th managing our IRA acct.
    In real estate I consider myself out of work after I close a home or should lose the listing. So laid off to me occurs often . I am always looking for work and now with this current r/e market. One must reinvent how to help buyers and sellers get through this awful mess. I have never been an order taker .I have always worked hard to get to closing. Focus on service and not your self, pay it forward and remember nothing is easy— work is work !
    Thanks for all of you and your posts of helpful advise. Just think we may have assisted someone that got the new job !!!!! What joy that would be to them and their family !!!!!!!
    Dave Bigos

  131. Great post Robert.

    There is a non-profit job support and networking group in the Phoenix Arizona area that people in Arizona should be aware of. Some of their resources are also useful to job seekers anywhere. Meetings are held twice a month and the mailing list is quite useful for current job openings and other job related information.

    http://www.scottsdalejobnet.com/

    Scottsdale Job Network (SJN) is a non-profit community group of business leaders and volunteers. SJN provides education in the job search process and all attendees have the opportunity to meet and work with people who offer support and guidance during employment transition. We are not a job placement forum, and we do not match candidates to openings nor do we send resumes to employers or recruiters. There is no guarantee of employment either directly through this group or as a result of association with SJN.

    The value of SJN lies in the skills, business networks and personal passions of our members. Membership is open to everyone willing to share their skills and anyone interested in local networking or in need of employment transition support.

    Scottsdale Job Network

  132. Great post Robert.

    There is a non-profit job support and networking group in the Phoenix Arizona area that people in Arizona should be aware of. Some of their resources are also useful to job seekers anywhere. Meetings are held twice a month and the mailing list is quite useful for current job openings and other job related information.

    http://www.scottsdalejobnet.com/

    Scottsdale Job Network (SJN) is a non-profit community group of business leaders and volunteers. SJN provides education in the job search process and all attendees have the opportunity to meet and work with people who offer support and guidance during employment transition. We are not a job placement forum, and we do not match candidates to openings nor do we send resumes to employers or recruiters. There is no guarantee of employment either directly through this group or as a result of association with SJN.

    The value of SJN lies in the skills, business networks and personal passions of our members. Membership is open to everyone willing to share their skills and anyone interested in local networking or in need of employment transition support.

    Scottsdale Job Network

  133. Hey Robert. Really liked this one. Some very good advice for people in such a situation. As in many areas in life it’s all about the people. A high percentage of people do get new jobs through people they know – and it’s very often the people they don’t know very well. I also got some nice job offers from people I don’t talk to every week or month.

    Good luck on finding a new job to everybody who sadly has just being laid off.

    Cheers,
    Thomas

  134. Hey Robert. Really liked this one. Some very good advice for people in such a situation. As in many areas in life it’s all about the people. A high percentage of people do get new jobs through people they know – and it’s very often the people they don’t know very well. I also got some nice job offers from people I don’t talk to every week or month.

    Good luck on finding a new job to everybody who sadly has just being laid off.

    Cheers,
    Thomas

  135. The tips are required and will make us to constantly remember what are the actions we are doing daily towards the goal and these kind of tips will practically give results as Robert is explaining.Good work Robert.

  136. The tips are required and will make us to constantly remember what are the actions we are doing daily towards the goal and these kind of tips will practically give results as Robert is explaining.Good work Robert.

  137. I have been a stock broker for 20 years and it has come to my attention that many people don’t know how to use their company stock which they may hold to generate monthly revenue. I specialize in this form of “Covered Call Writing”. You can actually generate 4% to 20% of total stock holdings in cash each month. I have helped many people in this situtation. This is basically free to do, just a little education. You can look at my website at http://www.ctsglobalinvestment.com or you can call me at 770-972-4476.

  138. I have been a stock broker for 20 years and it has come to my attention that many people don’t know how to use their company stock which they may hold to generate monthly revenue. I specialize in this form of “Covered Call Writing”. You can actually generate 4% to 20% of total stock holdings in cash each month. I have helped many people in this situtation. This is basically free to do, just a little education. You can look at my website at http://www.ctsglobalinvestment.com or you can call me at 770-972-4476.

  139. I followed this advice religiously and got a an offer 20 days into my search…

    What is even weirder and cooler is that it is also with NEC!

    Rock on!

    Brent

  140. I followed this advice religiously and got a an offer 20 days into my search…

    What is even weirder and cooler is that it is also with NEC!

    Rock on!

    Brent

  141. IF YOU HAVE ANY STOCK, NOW IS THE TIME TO DO COVERED CALL WRITING TO GENERATE CASH EACH MONTH…..WWW.CTSGLOBALINVESTMENT.COM

  142. IF YOU HAVE ANY STOCK, NOW IS THE TIME TO DO COVERED CALL WRITING TO GENERATE CASH EACH MONTH…..WWW.CTSGLOBALINVESTMENT.COM

  143. How To Handle The Dreaded Axe
    by
    Ramon Greenwood

    In these times of economic turmoil anyone can get the axe at any time. It happens to good people and bad ones…hard workers as well as slackers.

    “We feel you would be happier working for another company.”

    “Sorry, business is falling off. We no longer need your services.”

    “Operations are being consolidated in Mexico. The Bedrock Plant will be closed March 1.”

    Sugar-coated or not, the message is the same: You’re fired! You are out of a job! Your career path has been disrupted!

    Therefore, your career plan should include knowing what to do to survive and reach your career goals should you ever get the dreaded “pink slip”.

    13 Career Tips To Survive and Prosper

    1. Keep in mind that in the current environment the idea of womb to tomb job security is as dead as a hammer. Be loyal to your present employer, but never develop a romance with the organization. Know that the relationship can end at any time. There is enough suffering in store for anyone over the loss of a job without adding the pains of an unrequited love. Look out for yourself first.

    2. Be alert and well informed at all times about the outlook for your employer and your job. If you know things are going down the drain, begin a below-the-radar search for other opportunities. If the axe falls, you’ll have a head start on finding another job.

    3. Stay prepared financially. Always try to have enough cash in reserve to cover at least three months living expenses.

    4. Keep your skills up to date with the needs of the job market. Capitalize on opportunities for additional training. Read the literature of your field.

    5. Maintain an up-to-date record of your accomplishments so you can produce a resume in 24 hours.

    6. Nurture contacts with people in your line of work and with those likely to employ your type of qualifications. Be visible through outside activities and positive publicity.

    7. Help others who lose their jobs. Also, be of assistance to those who are looking to recruit employees. They may help you some day.

    8. Understand your emotions.

    Psychologist Bill Weber says getting fired is very much like dealing with the death of a loved one.

    “The first reaction is denial, or wishful thinking. There’s been a mistake. This can’t be true,” Dr. Weber says. “Then the shock sets in, followed by anger, depression, frustration and fear. Worst of all is the loss of self-esteem.”

    9. Let it go. Allow some time for grieving, but not too much. Don’t just sit there feeling sorry for yourself. It’s natural to be angry with your employer, but don’t let your feelings show. You still need him. Negotiate the best possible severance package possible for continuing pay and benefits, particularly insurance coverage. Don’t forget good references, too.

    10. Start immediately to launch your search for another, better job. Use this time to reassess the goals you have set for the rest of your life. Define the job that will enable you to achieve these objectives.

    11. Prepare a plan to market yourself. Let it be known you are available; “advertise” what you have to offer. Involve your network of friends and family in the job search.

    12. Be patient. Recognize it will take time to find another acceptable position.

    13. Don’t panic. If you possibly can afford to wait, don’t jump on the first opportunity that comes down the pike, unless, of course, it really matches up with your objectives.

    Career advice: remember two things.

    1. It can happen to anyone.

    2. A high percentage of people end up with better jobs than the ones from which they were fired.


    To subscribe to Ramon Greenwood’s free semi-monthly newsletter and blog please go to http://www.commonsenseatwork.com> His advice comes from a world of experience, including serving as Senior Vice President of American Express, an entrepreneur, professional director, career coach and author.

  144. How To Handle The Dreaded Axe
    by
    Ramon Greenwood

    In these times of economic turmoil anyone can get the axe at any time. It happens to good people and bad ones…hard workers as well as slackers.

    “We feel you would be happier working for another company.”

    “Sorry, business is falling off. We no longer need your services.”

    “Operations are being consolidated in Mexico. The Bedrock Plant will be closed March 1.”

    Sugar-coated or not, the message is the same: You’re fired! You are out of a job! Your career path has been disrupted!

    Therefore, your career plan should include knowing what to do to survive and reach your career goals should you ever get the dreaded “pink slip”.

    13 Career Tips To Survive and Prosper

    1. Keep in mind that in the current environment the idea of womb to tomb job security is as dead as a hammer. Be loyal to your present employer, but never develop a romance with the organization. Know that the relationship can end at any time. There is enough suffering in store for anyone over the loss of a job without adding the pains of an unrequited love. Look out for yourself first.

    2. Be alert and well informed at all times about the outlook for your employer and your job. If you know things are going down the drain, begin a below-the-radar search for other opportunities. If the axe falls, you’ll have a head start on finding another job.

    3. Stay prepared financially. Always try to have enough cash in reserve to cover at least three months living expenses.

    4. Keep your skills up to date with the needs of the job market. Capitalize on opportunities for additional training. Read the literature of your field.

    5. Maintain an up-to-date record of your accomplishments so you can produce a resume in 24 hours.

    6. Nurture contacts with people in your line of work and with those likely to employ your type of qualifications. Be visible through outside activities and positive publicity.

    7. Help others who lose their jobs. Also, be of assistance to those who are looking to recruit employees. They may help you some day.

    8. Understand your emotions.

    Psychologist Bill Weber says getting fired is very much like dealing with the death of a loved one.

    “The first reaction is denial, or wishful thinking. There’s been a mistake. This can’t be true,” Dr. Weber says. “Then the shock sets in, followed by anger, depression, frustration and fear. Worst of all is the loss of self-esteem.”

    9. Let it go. Allow some time for grieving, but not too much. Don’t just sit there feeling sorry for yourself. It’s natural to be angry with your employer, but don’t let your feelings show. You still need him. Negotiate the best possible severance package possible for continuing pay and benefits, particularly insurance coverage. Don’t forget good references, too.

    10. Start immediately to launch your search for another, better job. Use this time to reassess the goals you have set for the rest of your life. Define the job that will enable you to achieve these objectives.

    11. Prepare a plan to market yourself. Let it be known you are available; “advertise” what you have to offer. Involve your network of friends and family in the job search.

    12. Be patient. Recognize it will take time to find another acceptable position.

    13. Don’t panic. If you possibly can afford to wait, don’t jump on the first opportunity that comes down the pike, unless, of course, it really matches up with your objectives.

    Career advice: remember two things.

    1. It can happen to anyone.

    2. A high percentage of people end up with better jobs than the ones from which they were fired.


    To subscribe to Ramon Greenwood’s free semi-monthly newsletter and blog please go to http://www.commonsenseatwork.com> His advice comes from a world of experience, including serving as Senior Vice President of American Express, an entrepreneur, professional director, career coach and author.

  145. Great comments Robert!

    Most job seekers today still use old school strategies that worked when resumes were made of paper. In today’s Web 2.0 world, there are so many ways to give yourself an unfair advantage in the job seeking world, and you mention a few.

    I disagree with one tip #8…because cover letters are dead. Check out my podcast interview with

    I’ve got one point of disagreement with you Robert….cover letters that you mention in tip #8. Cover letters are the dinosaur of today’s job search. Cover letters are dead, a waste of time, and can actually be detrimental to your resume.

    Web 2.0 tip: Customize your resume, not your cover letter! Check out my interview with Chris Russell here (http://recareered.blogspot.com/2008/02/ugly-job-hunting-truthsand-what-you-can.html) and see why cover letters are dead (hint…resume databases strip the cover letter off, and don’t search them).

    For more ways to get an unfair advantage in your job search, Job Search 2.0 techniques, and Resume Search Optimization tips, check out http://www.reCareered.blogspot.com.

    If you’d like a free resume review, or for help or coaching to get an unfair advantage in your own job search, go to http://www.reCareered.com.

    Phil Rosenberg
    President, reCareered & Rainmakers Global
    Phone: 773-831-4628
    Email: phil.rainmakers@gmail.com
    Web: http://www.reCareered.com
    Blog: http://reCareered.blogspot.com
    LinkedIN: http://www.linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
    Facebook: http://profile.to/philrosenberg/

  146. Great comments Robert!

    Most job seekers today still use old school strategies that worked when resumes were made of paper. In today’s Web 2.0 world, there are so many ways to give yourself an unfair advantage in the job seeking world, and you mention a few.

    I disagree with one tip #8…because cover letters are dead. Check out my podcast interview with

    I’ve got one point of disagreement with you Robert….cover letters that you mention in tip #8. Cover letters are the dinosaur of today’s job search. Cover letters are dead, a waste of time, and can actually be detrimental to your resume.

    Web 2.0 tip: Customize your resume, not your cover letter! Check out my interview with Chris Russell here (http://recareered.blogspot.com/2008/02/ugly-job-hunting-truthsand-what-you-can.html) and see why cover letters are dead (hint…resume databases strip the cover letter off, and don’t search them).

    For more ways to get an unfair advantage in your job search, Job Search 2.0 techniques, and Resume Search Optimization tips, check out http://www.reCareered.blogspot.com.

    If you’d like a free resume review, or for help or coaching to get an unfair advantage in your own job search, go to http://www.reCareered.com.

    Phil Rosenberg
    President, reCareered & Rainmakers Global
    Phone: 773-831-4628
    Email: phil.rainmakers@gmail.com
    Web: http://www.reCareered.com
    Blog: http://reCareered.blogspot.com
    LinkedIN: http://www.linkedin.com/in/philrosenberg
    Facebook: http://profile.to/philrosenberg/

  147. [...] able to do as much the last few years. I’m also following Scoble’s (pretty sage, IMHO) advice on unemployment, which means I’ll be attending events and taking meetings on my travels. So if you have any [...]

  148. I have been out of a job for 14 months. I had to get food stamps a few days ago. You may think I am unhappy but I am not. You have to make the best of any situation. I may have no money and things are hard but I am the Happiest I have ever been! When you got through a bad time just enjoy the ride and take a laugh. I continue to look for work and will find a career soon. I would tell anybody look for a job and volunteer at the same time. Take advantage of this time and make the best of things. Whatever happens don’t read too much into anything. If our economy gets worse than we as Americans will have to rise to the occasion and make the best of things. When things get better and they will we as Americans can work harder and make this country into what it used to be.

  149. I have been out of a job for 14 months. I had to get food stamps a few days ago. You may think I am unhappy but I am not. You have to make the best of any situation. I may have no money and things are hard but I am the Happiest I have ever been! When you got through a bad time just enjoy the ride and take a laugh. I continue to look for work and will find a career soon. I would tell anybody look for a job and volunteer at the same time. Take advantage of this time and make the best of things. Whatever happens don’t read too much into anything. If our economy gets worse than we as Americans will have to rise to the occasion and make the best of things. When things get better and they will we as Americans can work harder and make this country into what it used to be.

  150. [...] From Tech Geek Blogger, Scobelizer It’s sad to hear about layoffs at companies like Yahoo. Right now it seems like a bad time to be laid off. I’m here to offer some hope.  I laid myself off in February 2002. Remember that time? It was far worse than what we’ve seen so far in the economic turmoil of 2008.It seemed like EVERYONE was laid off. There was even a Website, fuckedcompany.com, that tracked layoff after layoff. No good news, like the funding of Automattic, was coming out. 9/11 just happened and it seemed to be particularly dire. But even in that tough time I found a job working at NEC. Here’s some tips I learned from that time.  1. Don’t get lazy. It might seem dire, but if you work it you WILL find a job. Some of my friends went on vacation, started drinking, or generally just hung out with their families. Those people took a LOT longer to find a job than the friends of mine who approached their time off with these tips.2. Make sure you spend at least 30% of every day trying to find a job. That means working on your resume. Getting your cover letter finished. Sending out resumes. Searching the web for work. Networking. Etc. At first your time spent on these tasks should be a lot higher, but after weeks of watching the job sites for jobs and having your resume checked over by 10 of your friends you will naturally have more time to spend on other things. 3. Start a blog on the field you want to work in. Want to be a PHP programmer? Start a PHP blog and make sure you put world class stuff there. Link to EVERYONE who has a PHP blog. But that’s only the beginning.4. Do things that will get you to be recognized as a world leader in the field you want to be in. Are you a programmer? Build something and put it up! Share your knowledge on your blog (give tips you’ve learned). Are you a program manager? Those jobs will be tougher to find, but you should demonstrate that you are a great manager of people as well as that you’re expert on the kinds of things you want to do. Demo! Demo! Demo!5. Learn from Loic Le Meur. How did he get thousands of videos uploaded on Seesmic everyday? He networked. He visited tons of journalists, bloggers, executives. He is a consumate networker (you should watch him work the halls here at the World Economic Forum).6. Do a video everyday on YouTube that demonstrates something you know. Loic does a video everyday. If you’re laid off you have absolutely no excuses. Get a cheap Web cam and get over to YouTube or Seesmic.7. Show your friends your resume and cover letter. Don’t have any friends? Now is the time to make some. Call up some interesting people and ask for an informational interview. This is particularly key if you work at a big company and are getting laid off. I watched people at Microsoft get laid off and the ones who had tons of internal informational interviews got new jobs fast. The key is to meet people everyday and get in front of them. Not to beg for a job, but to do research on the industry you want to work in. You’d be amazed how showing some interest in your industry will get noticed itself.8. Do the basics. I got my NEC job by sending a resume into a job that I found on Craig’s List. Yes, my blog helped me AFTER I got the interview, but I got the interview just by having a great cover letter and an interesting resume.9. Don’t feel bad about taking government assistance. You’ll need it to pay your bills. I took it and it helped me get over that tough period. Read original post [...]

  151. One of the things that you could have mentioned is always be prepared to be laid off. Always keep your resume up to date.

    Make a brief summary of that project you worked on last month. You might not remember the details a year from now.

  152. One of the things that you could have mentioned is always be prepared to be laid off. Always keep your resume up to date.

    Make a brief summary of that project you worked on last month. You might not remember the details a year from now.

  153. All good advice, except for the part about taking government assistance. You should feel bad about this. It means you are living off of others who have no choice in the matter. Legalized theft.

    Borrow from family, friends, seek charity, churches etc, don’t take from me.

  154. All good advice, except for the part about taking government assistance. You should feel bad about this. It means you are living off of others who have no choice in the matter. Legalized theft.

    Borrow from family, friends, seek charity, churches etc, don’t take from me.

  155. Solid advice listed above. I took an 8-day vacation immediately, to celebrate an anniversary, knowing that I would not have 8 days to do so after getting a new job.

    Re: Gov’t assistance
    I’ve been paying taxes in one of the top ten taxed states for the last 25 years. I was laid off on 3/11–absolutely no fault of my own, I was the top performer in 2007. I did apply for “unemployment insurance,” and it will help me stay in my house, feed my family and keep up with life/health insurance. It’s a supplement to the emergency fund. I have no qualms about using it, nor do I have problems with others who are legitimately in the same position I am…

    Good things to you all.

  156. Solid advice listed above. I took an 8-day vacation immediately, to celebrate an anniversary, knowing that I would not have 8 days to do so after getting a new job.

    Re: Gov’t assistance
    I’ve been paying taxes in one of the top ten taxed states for the last 25 years. I was laid off on 3/11–absolutely no fault of my own, I was the top performer in 2007. I did apply for “unemployment insurance,” and it will help me stay in my house, feed my family and keep up with life/health insurance. It’s a supplement to the emergency fund. I have no qualms about using it, nor do I have problems with others who are legitimately in the same position I am…

    Good things to you all.

  157. Great and helpful post and good comments. Does anyone know whether someone has tried an open testimonial page where previous colleagues or friends can post testimonials for someone who got laid-off? I am trying this and will see how it works. It is good to know that I am not alone! Such is the influence of the web.

  158. Great and helpful post and good comments. Does anyone know whether someone has tried an open testimonial page where previous colleagues or friends can post testimonials for someone who got laid-off? I am trying this and will see how it works. It is good to know that I am not alone! Such is the influence of the web.

  159. Here’s a fresh idea,Just leave this idiot country as fast as you can.Stop fighting the stupid tred mill/debt slavery model. Go some place where wages and cost of living are more reasonable. While it’s true this option is not optimal for everyone, you stand a better shot at having life where you are not thrown out of work every damn recession because of some pathetic American executive’s decisions. Good luck!

  160. Here’s a fresh idea,Just leave this idiot country as fast as you can.Stop fighting the stupid tred mill/debt slavery model. Go some place where wages and cost of living are more reasonable. While it’s true this option is not optimal for everyone, you stand a better shot at having life where you are not thrown out of work every damn recession because of some pathetic American executive’s decisions. Good luck!

  161. Love the idea of posting on YouTube. Get on Twitter too. If you want some low tech advice that will get you away from your computer, I got some here. http://is.gd/XZc

    As a self-employed in the last 4 years, I still remember what it means losing a job. It is terrible if you can’t earn and you need money NOW.

    In short, you can learn how to make a few balloon animals. It will be easier to meet people.

  162. Love the idea of posting on YouTube. Get on Twitter too. If you want some low tech advice that will get you away from your computer, I got some here. http://is.gd/XZc

    As a self-employed in the last 4 years, I still remember what it means losing a job. It is terrible if you can’t earn and you need money NOW.

    In short, you can learn how to make a few balloon animals. It will be easier to meet people.

  163. I found your blog on google and read a few of your other posts. I just added you to my Google News Reader. Keep up the good work. Look forward to reading more from you in the future.

  164. I found your blog on google and read a few of your other posts. I just added you to my Google News Reader. Keep up the good work. Look forward to reading more from you in the future.

  165. I love this one: “4. Do things that will get you to be recognized as a world leader in the field you want to be in. Are you a programmer? Build something and put it up!”

    I call it “starting work before you’re hired.” It’s one thing to claim you’re a whiz at this or that, but it’s quite another — and sets you instantly apart from the hordes of ordinary job seekers — to prove your skills by demonstrating them on your blog, in a YouTube video or in something you FedEx to hiring managers.

    Kevin Donlin
    http://www.TheSimpleJobSearch.com

  166. I love this one: “4. Do things that will get you to be recognized as a world leader in the field you want to be in. Are you a programmer? Build something and put it up!”

    I call it “starting work before you’re hired.” It’s one thing to claim you’re a whiz at this or that, but it’s quite another — and sets you instantly apart from the hordes of ordinary job seekers — to prove your skills by demonstrating them on your blog, in a YouTube video or in something you FedEx to hiring managers.

    Kevin Donlin
    http://www.TheSimpleJobSearch.com

  167. People always hate to talk about when they are laid off. But as it has become every day’s news headline since Yahoo started it with cutting 1500 of its task force last year, now a need of platform has been in demand where people can express their selves in words how they are feeling about their company, whey the got laid off was that justified or not. And every thing they want to tell anonymously.

    And http://www.layoffgossip.com is providing you that platform.

  168. People always hate to talk about when they are laid off. But as it has become every day’s news headline since Yahoo started it with cutting 1500 of its task force last year, now a need of platform has been in demand where people can express their selves in words how they are feeling about their company, whey the got laid off was that justified or not. And every thing they want to tell anonymously.

    And http://www.layoffgossip.com is providing you that platform.

  169. People always hate to talk about when they are laid off. But as it has become every day’s news headline since Yahoo started it with cutting 1500 of its task force last year, now a need of platform has been in demand where people can express their selves in words how they are feeling about their company, whey the got laid off was that justified or not.
    And every thing they want to tell anonymously.And http://www.layoffgossip.com is providing you that platform.

  170. People always hate to talk about when they are laid off. But as it has become every day’s news headline since Yahoo started it with cutting 1500 of its task force last year, now a need of platform has been in demand where people can express their selves in words how they are feeling about their company, whey the got laid off was that justified or not.
    And every thing they want to tell anonymously.And http://www.layoffgossip.com is providing you that platform.

  171. Just wanted to add a small tip on creating a recession proof career. It would be a good idea to plan out your career or business by considering government contracting. This is a very lucrative financial opportunity that can help you stabilize financially and increase your income flow if it is done the right way.

    If this is something that you are interested in to put an end to your financial worries, get yourself registered with the Central Contractor Registry which is a federal clearing house for vendors and small businesses too. Also identify a product or service that you can supply to the government and which the government needs in order to get a contract.

    You can win such billion dollar contracts and secure your career or business better even during this phase of recession.