Photowalking with Annie Leibovitz

Wow, just spent an hour walking through some of Annie Leibovitz’ new photography at her just-opened exhibition at San Francisco’s Legion of Honor museum. She gives us a tour and I bring you along with a front-row look. Thank you to Qik and my Nokia cell phone for making this kind of video possible. Unfortunately I could only record about 40 minutes or so of her walk through the museum, but that was most of it. Later I asked her about how much time people give her, and told her that Bill Gates only gave me 17 minutes to interview him. She said Bill only gave her 10 minutes. Now I’m even more impressed with her work. I thought her subjects gave her hours to work. After all, she is THE most famous celebrity photographer of our time (she hates the word “celebrity” by the way, believes famous people are just people).

My hands are shaking, this was such a big thrill for me. She’s one of those people I’ve always looked up to and enjoyed her work. One person, who introduced her before I started my video, said that he felt that Annie has captured his age’s popular culture.

Oh, and thank you to Marc Silber, professional photographer (you see him in the video a couple of times). He went to school with her and invited me and Rocky along. Marc and I are going to do some amazing things for Photowalking. We filmed this on our professional cameras, you can see Rocky, my producer, in the background on the first video.

It’s an amazing exhibition of her work, highly recommended if you’re into photography.

Comments

  1. I used to work as an assistant to Annie Leibowitz (sic). She was even so kind as to let me stay in her apartment in the Dakota, in New York, for a month during one of my break ups.

    I went on a shoot with her to Benjamin Spock’s house in Oklahoma. The main thing I was afraid of was the strobe power pack falling in the water off the dock and it exploding. That wasn’t her concern.

    The interesting thing was trying figure out how she got people to react to the way she wanted them to look in front of the camera – and why she put the camera in a particular place.

    I worked for a lot of famous photographers and it was a very difficult thing to understand.

  2. I used to work as an assistant to Annie Leibowitz (sic). She was even so kind as to let me stay in her apartment in the Dakota, in New York, for a month during one of my break ups.

    I went on a shoot with her to Benjamin Spock’s house in Oklahoma. The main thing I was afraid of was the strobe power pack falling in the water off the dock and it exploding. That wasn’t her concern.

    The interesting thing was trying figure out how she got people to react to the way she wanted them to look in front of the camera – and why she put the camera in a particular place.

    I worked for a lot of famous photographers and it was a very difficult thing to understand.

  3. She’s all Leni Riefenstahl gone ‘Rock and Roll McDonald’s’ pop-culture Celebrities, with TONS of pointless Susan Sontag and family snaps. Great photographer for sure, but this (book) collection is horrid, poetry singing to itself about itself for itself.

    going to do some amazing things for Photowalking.

    Taking moving pictures of people taking non-moving pictures, featuring moving pictures of the people taking moving pictures of the non-moving picturetakers being pictured in motion. Can’t wait…

    Hi. :)

  4. She’s all Leni Riefenstahl gone ‘Rock and Roll McDonald’s’ pop-culture Celebrities, with TONS of pointless Susan Sontag and family snaps. Great photographer for sure, but this (book) collection is horrid, poetry singing to itself about itself for itself.

    going to do some amazing things for Photowalking.

    Taking moving pictures of people taking non-moving pictures, featuring moving pictures of the people taking moving pictures of the non-moving picturetakers being pictured in motion. Can’t wait…

    Hi. :)

  5. All that’s left is just a silly snapshot!

    Well, what I said, in Hollywoodish vampercode. Yeah, her value is in the WHO rather than the HOW or WHAT.

  6. All that’s left is just a silly snapshot!

    Well, what I said, in Hollywoodish vampercode. Yeah, her value is in the WHO rather than the HOW or WHAT.