TED Jealousy

Ahh, the TED Jealousy leaked out of the blogosphere yesterday. First there was a Twitter fight between Loic Le Meur, Seesmic’s CEO (who was at TED) and Mike Arrington, TechCrunch’s founder (who was not). Then a journalist from BusinessWeek, Sarah Lacy, beat up TED for not being inclusive.

I’ve been there. I used to get jealous when I got locked out of events. Heck, just go back a few days and read my post about living a FOOCamp life.

But yesterday I had revenge: I went to Bil.

And next week I’ll have revenge again: I’m going to BarCamp.

See, I don’t get why people complain about being locked out of events. TED is giving us all an opportunity: create our own experiences that are more interesting than those on the floor of TED *and* more open!

Yesterday one of the TED attendees started bragging about how great going to TED was.

I answered “sounds great, but yesterday I hung out with Annie Leibovitz instead.” That ended the bragging, although having Robin Williams in front of you does sound pretty damn cool.

Anyway, why are bloggers and journalists jealous? I think Mike Arrington had some deep transparency with this comment on this Twitter: “regarding TED attacks – I defame anything cool that ignores me, until it stops doing so. it’s worked so far.”

Seriously: bloggers and journalists live and die by having access to stories and storymakers. Anytime there’s a gathering of executives we know there are potential stories, so we want to go.

If locked out (TED doesn’t invite many journalists, only letting a handful in and those who go have to agree to a lot of rules) then bloggers and journalists start feeling jealous of those who do get to go. We’re a competitive bunch, because if someone else is getting the stories then those locked out feel beaten.

But that’s based on a false premise: that only rich and powerful people can create stories.

I’ve found that’s not true. Sarah and Mike, you could have come to Bil. Why didn’t you? There were lots of geeks showing off lots of toys. There were even speakers who have spoken at TED. More videos from yesterday here and here.

One thing, though, TED does have the best badges (video shows why).

So, Sarah and Mike, will you be at the Barcamp at SXSW? Or, you gonna keep complaining about events that lock people out?

Hey, maybe the three of us should do an event the way we think it should be done? Imagine if Fast Company, BusinessWeek, and TechCrunch collaborated on an event. Wouldn’t that turn up something interesting?

77 thoughts on “TED Jealousy

  1. I’m not a big name; I’m not attached to any big names. I have a pretty active weblog, which I didn’t try to hide. And I got into TED. And if I go, I’ll blog about it.

    The six grand will really hurt, but I would like to go for the experience. I don’t imagine networking will be a big thing in my case. I find it hard to imagine that anybody would be interested in having a former academic/ novelist on their rolodex. Or Blackberry.

    So I have to decide by the end of this month. It’s hard to think about anything else.

  2. I’m not a big name; I’m not attached to any big names. I have a pretty active weblog, which I didn’t try to hide. And I got into TED. And if I go, I’ll blog about it.

    The six grand will really hurt, but I would like to go for the experience. I don’t imagine networking will be a big thing in my case. I find it hard to imagine that anybody would be interested in having a former academic/ novelist on their rolodex. Or Blackberry.

    So I have to decide by the end of this month. It’s hard to think about anything else.

  3. Well, from what I hear from Mitch TED is all but boring:

    http://www.twistimage.com/blog/archives/marketing-perspectives-courtesy-of-ted/

    But I also think people need to get over the left out feeling, there will always be events like that. From a european viewpoint it’s all quite far away anyway ;-)

    But as you said, there are Barcamps and other such events which are also quite inspiring. And luckily we in Germany now have a barcamp nearly every 2-3 weeks ;-) (ok, admitted that it might become less inspiring if you go to every one of them as topics and people might be the same but therefor it then feels more like family ;-) ).

    And btw, even in open source settings there are sometimes events which are limited, like the recent Plone Strategic Planning Summit the Plone project did. Here some effort was done though to include community thoughts but the event itself was limited in order to handle the amount of discussions. Now of course it’s the question if it wouldn’t have worked with more people and certainly communication could always be enhanced but it seems that not too many people felt too left out.

    And everybody feeling jealous about somebody else regarding a cool event maybe think again and you migth remember some cool event you attended which was unique and inspirational and which all those people did not attend.

  4. Well, from what I hear from Mitch TED is all but boring:

    http://www.twistimage.com/blog/archives/marketing-perspectives-courtesy-of-ted/

    But I also think people need to get over the left out feeling, there will always be events like that. From a european viewpoint it’s all quite far away anyway ;-)

    But as you said, there are Barcamps and other such events which are also quite inspiring. And luckily we in Germany now have a barcamp nearly every 2-3 weeks ;-) (ok, admitted that it might become less inspiring if you go to every one of them as topics and people might be the same but therefor it then feels more like family ;-) ).

    And btw, even in open source settings there are sometimes events which are limited, like the recent Plone Strategic Planning Summit the Plone project did. Here some effort was done though to include community thoughts but the event itself was limited in order to handle the amount of discussions. Now of course it’s the question if it wouldn’t have worked with more people and certainly communication could always be enhanced but it seems that not too many people felt too left out.

    And everybody feeling jealous about somebody else regarding a cool event maybe think again and you migth remember some cool event you attended which was unique and inspirational and which all those people did not attend.

  5. Stephanie: it was cool and amazing. She’s someone I’ve always wanted to meet. If we get to go along with her on a shoot that will make a KILLER Photowalking show.

  6. Stephanie: it was cool and amazing. She’s someone I’ve always wanted to meet. If we get to go along with her on a shoot that will make a KILLER Photowalking show.

  7. Only reason I would be jealous is that here in Tampa Bay we never seem to have those “big” conferences, although we are hosting the Second Life Community Convention in the fall. In any event, I congratulate Loïc on getting an invite and I’m sure he’s excited to be up close and personal with some of the best in the field. Hopefully it’ll be a great learning opportunity.

    As for Mr. Arrington: Get over yourself. It ain’t about you. ;-)

  8. Only reason I would be jealous is that here in Tampa Bay we never seem to have those “big” conferences, although we are hosting the Second Life Community Convention in the fall. In any event, I congratulate Loïc on getting an invite and I’m sure he’s excited to be up close and personal with some of the best in the field. Hopefully it’ll be a great learning opportunity.

    As for Mr. Arrington: Get over yourself. It ain’t about you. ;-)

  9. Hello Robert. Thanks for this post. I was just talking to some friends today about jealousy (as a concept). I have to say – I don’t get it! I am trained to listen for the phrase, “I’m so jealous…” To me – using that language is an immediate red flag for a lack of love and compassion. If someone uses that language – I know to steer clear of them! This may sound too touchy feely for some – but let me sum it up (Nike style): Don’t be jealous – just do it yourself! You can make anything happen, if you really want it. When someone shares a great experience they’ve had – I say, “I’m so happy for you!!” At every moment we should strive for gratitude in our own experience and compassion for others.

    To me… jealousy for the day-to-day experiences of others just seems like a major waste of energy! It’s really just a reflection of deep insecurity with self. And .. while that may drive traffic and sell newspapers, it surely will not make you a happier, more content person. True success comes from inner security.

    P.S. – I’m so happy you met Annie Leibovitz. How totally cool and amazing!

  10. Hello Robert. Thanks for this post. I was just talking to some friends today about jealousy (as a concept). I have to say – I don’t get it! I am trained to listen for the phrase, “I’m so jealous…” To me – using that language is an immediate red flag for a lack of love and compassion. If someone uses that language – I know to steer clear of them! This may sound too touchy feely for some – but let me sum it up (Nike style): Don’t be jealous – just do it yourself! You can make anything happen, if you really want it. When someone shares a great experience they’ve had – I say, “I’m so happy for you!!” At every moment we should strive for gratitude in our own experience and compassion for others.

    To me… jealousy for the day-to-day experiences of others just seems like a major waste of energy! It’s really just a reflection of deep insecurity with self. And .. while that may drive traffic and sell newspapers, it surely will not make you a happier, more content person. True success comes from inner security.

    P.S. – I’m so happy you met Annie Leibovitz. How totally cool and amazing!

  11. It ll ends up sounding like another A-list whine anyways.

    TED… the retort is Bel. (Oops, sorry, it’s “Bil”.)

    The weak head nod to being a supposed journalist. Then comes the admission that – HEY! – it’s video that matters.

    It’s all the same… the bottom line is Robert *always* whines when he’s dissed.

    Does it matter? Only to him. But to those others who attended (or not) this TED thing… or Davos… or Bil….

    You know, us commonfolk… this all simply flies over our collective heads.

    How easily Robert can PR most of us with his manipulaive whining about being slighted. And that’s shameful.

  12. It ll ends up sounding like another A-list whine anyways.

    TED… the retort is Bel. (Oops, sorry, it’s “Bil”.)

    The weak head nod to being a supposed journalist. Then comes the admission that – HEY! – it’s video that matters.

    It’s all the same… the bottom line is Robert *always* whines when he’s dissed.

    Does it matter? Only to him. But to those others who attended (or not) this TED thing… or Davos… or Bil….

    You know, us commonfolk… this all simply flies over our collective heads.

    How easily Robert can PR most of us with his manipulaive whining about being slighted. And that’s shameful.

  13. Wow, so Jr. High. And so limiting a world view…

    But Twitter and blog away…taking to thyselves about thyselves.

  14. Wow, so Jr. High. And so limiting a world view…

    But Twitter and blog away…taking to thyselves about thyselves.

  15. Julio & Robert – I’m actually working on a conference with some great people (to be announced once players are confirmed – should be by sxsw) that will be much like Fast Company, BusinessWeek, and TechCrunch combination. :) Planning for August. working on it now. more to come soon!

  16. Julio & Robert – I’m actually working on a conference with some great people (to be announced once players are confirmed – should be by sxsw) that will be much like Fast Company, BusinessWeek, and TechCrunch combination. :) Planning for August. working on it now. more to come soon!

  17. Oh please, Robert… don’t go down this path and talk about being jealous or upset about not being invited to something. You’ll bring yourself down to the level of the Arrington’s and Winer’s of this world. Whine too much and you’ll stop being invited to the things you were once being invited to. Just go ask Dave about that. Some have such arrogant egos that it’s quite off putting to read their dribble when they complain about not being invited somewhere.

  18. Oh please, Robert… don’t go down this path and talk about being jealous or upset about not being invited to something. You’ll bring yourself down to the level of the Arrington’s and Winer’s of this world. Whine too much and you’ll stop being invited to the things you were once being invited to. Just go ask Dave about that. Some have such arrogant egos that it’s quite off putting to read their dribble when they complain about not being invited somewhere.

  19. Someone asks “do things like TED actually accomplish anything.” From my three TEDs I would say, emphatically, yes. Former VP Al Gore exposed his climate crisis slide show to the TED audience two years ago. Photoshop was first introduced at TED, many years ago. This year Dave Eggers (http://www.ted.com/index.php/pages/view/id/163) gave a passionate talk on education and tutoring and it led me to volunteer for his program the very same day.If you get a chance to watch his talk, do it! Last year E.O. Wilson (http://www.ted.com/index.php/pages/view/id/166) presented and, this year, introduced an amazing Encyclopedia of Life (http://www.eol.org) – documenting 1.8 million species.

    TED, for me, is not about networking. Sure, I meet some fantastic people but I attend for the information, the sessions, the speakers. I don’t go trying to sell myself or any of my ventures. Maybe this is simply because I’m a poor networker but, more than likely, because the days are crammed with information that after a 13 hour day, I’m exhausted. Most of the people I know attend all the sessions, talk over lunch, enjoy the evening cocktail party or reception and then crash.

    Last year my father, a physician, attended with me (after I convinced him that it wasn’t a computer event) and he loved it. One of his best moments was spending time talking to Jeff Skoll at one of the evening social events. Who’s Jeff? He’s a one of the first eBay employees and now a wonderful film producer – bringing to the screen projects like The Kite Runner and Syriana. I encouraged my dad to signup for this year’s event. He hesitated just a tad too long – and it sold out.

    Regarding the $6K price. It’s a lot, for sure. Luckily, a bunch of people that attend TED spend even more than that so that others that are unable to pay the fee can attend. As soon as I’m in a position to do that I’ll join their ranks. Few things would give me as much pleasure as being able to help someone else jump into the pool of energy and information that’s presented at TED.

  20. Someone asks “do things like TED actually accomplish anything.” From my three TEDs I would say, emphatically, yes. Former VP Al Gore exposed his climate crisis slide show to the TED audience two years ago. Photoshop was first introduced at TED, many years ago. This year Dave Eggers (http://www.ted.com/index.php/pages/view/id/163) gave a passionate talk on education and tutoring and it led me to volunteer for his program the very same day.If you get a chance to watch his talk, do it! Last year E.O. Wilson (http://www.ted.com/index.php/pages/view/id/166) presented and, this year, introduced an amazing Encyclopedia of Life (http://www.eol.org) – documenting 1.8 million species.

    TED, for me, is not about networking. Sure, I meet some fantastic people but I attend for the information, the sessions, the speakers. I don’t go trying to sell myself or any of my ventures. Maybe this is simply because I’m a poor networker but, more than likely, because the days are crammed with information that after a 13 hour day, I’m exhausted. Most of the people I know attend all the sessions, talk over lunch, enjoy the evening cocktail party or reception and then crash.

    Last year my father, a physician, attended with me (after I convinced him that it wasn’t a computer event) and he loved it. One of his best moments was spending time talking to Jeff Skoll at one of the evening social events. Who’s Jeff? He’s a one of the first eBay employees and now a wonderful film producer – bringing to the screen projects like The Kite Runner and Syriana. I encouraged my dad to signup for this year’s event. He hesitated just a tad too long – and it sold out.

    Regarding the $6K price. It’s a lot, for sure. Luckily, a bunch of people that attend TED spend even more than that so that others that are unable to pay the fee can attend. As soon as I’m in a position to do that I’ll join their ranks. Few things would give me as much pleasure as being able to help someone else jump into the pool of energy and information that’s presented at TED.

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