Flickr’s fourth birthday “adults only”

Interesting, next week Stewart Butterfield will return to his post at Yahoo as founder of photosharing site Flickr after taking several weeks off for maternity leave.

But, if he were to try to bring his family to Flickr’s fourth birthday celebration tonight he would have gotten turned away at the door like we were.

The official Flickr invite email didn’t mention this. Hmm, at least I got a T-shirt out of it.

Anyway, competitor SmugMug invites families to its parties (and even holds camping trips for families). When we interviewed SmugMug there were even babies in their workplace (along with dogs). Both of which I thought were very cool. I guess Yahoo doesn’t allow the integration of family and work life at this level.

Competitor Zooomr is run by a 20-year-old (who was 18 when he started the company).

Some of my favorite photographers, Matt Roe being one, are even younger.

Oh, well, this motivated me to copy all my photos to SmugMug finally (which started a while back when I got a good interview with the CEO). Now I understand why thousands of people pay SmugMug to host their photos.

UPDATE: I’m not dumping Flickr, just copying my photos over to SmugMug so I can talk about SmugMug more often.

Being family supportive is important in this world, particularly with photography.

The team from Flickr blamed the venue, saying that they have insurance that only allows adults.

That’s OK, next time Flickr asks me to come and cover a new feature or something I’ll say the same thing: my venue only allows family-friendly sites.

So, what do we do when we’re kicked out of parties? We eat sushi (which we hear was a lot better than what they were serving at the Flickr party anyway).

Heheh, I did get some news from Gabe Rivera, the guy who runs TechMeme.

81 thoughts on “Flickr’s fourth birthday “adults only”

  1. Jake: it wasn’t a bar. I looked in and it looked more like a museum to me with more than 2,000 photos being displayed. It wasn’t a “drinking fest” it was a celebration of four years of Flickr.

    But, no matter, I’m not arguing with you guys anymore. The real mistake is the invite didn’t say anything about it being 21-and-older and I didn’t think that it was going to be adult-only, so I didn’t ask.

    Funny enough, MySpace is throwing a party with a band and a DJ and a bar and all that and they said “all ages welcome.” I guess you better not come to that, since people who want to live life without being surrounded by kids won’t be happy there.

    Kids weren’t allowed at the Facebook party? Hmmm, I saw many 18 year olds there. The one thing I should have complained about is not being able to take my backpack into that one. But, I couldn’t really complain because I got an email that said “don’t bring bags.”

  2. Jake: it wasn’t a bar. I looked in and it looked more like a museum to me with more than 2,000 photos being displayed. It wasn’t a “drinking fest” it was a celebration of four years of Flickr.

    But, no matter, I’m not arguing with you guys anymore. The real mistake is the invite didn’t say anything about it being 21-and-older and I didn’t think that it was going to be adult-only, so I didn’t ask.

    Funny enough, MySpace is throwing a party with a band and a DJ and a bar and all that and they said “all ages welcome.” I guess you better not come to that, since people who want to live life without being surrounded by kids won’t be happy there.

    Kids weren’t allowed at the Facebook party? Hmmm, I saw many 18 year olds there. The one thing I should have complained about is not being able to take my backpack into that one. But, I couldn’t really complain because I got an email that said “don’t bring bags.”

  3. @Robert, come on man, this is ridiculous. You said:

    > “If you want an adult night out, go to a Playboy party.”

    Wow. So when my wife and I leave the baby with the in-laws and head out with another couple to get away from the kids for a while, the only viable destination has to be sponsored by Playboy? Or when I want date night with the wife, the movie we see should be softcore porn? That’s beyond foolish, and hopefully you don’t actually mean it.

    “Photography should be a family affair and you should expect to have kids involved.”

    This seems fairly obvious, but you know that Photography and Flickr aren’t one in the same, right? That’d be like saying the Facebook party at SXSW equates to the use of social networking.

    (As a side note, I didn’t hear you complaining about kids not being allowed at the FB SXSW party…)

    “Not to mention that my son isn’t your usual kid and is very respectful of adults. Even last night he didn’t get involved in trying to get into the party and waited quietly outside.”

    Bravo. You’ve taught your kid great manners, congrats. Seriously. But beyond that, A-List power doesn’t (or shouldn’t) equate to different treatment.

    The craziest thing in this thread, however is this line:
    “If you say you don’t want my son around because you want to be ‘child free’ then that’s an attack on me and my family.”

    Absolutely, unquestionably false. Wrong, wrong, wrong. This is an aggressively foolish argument to try to make – no one is “attacking” you, your son, or your family by saying they want to attend an event free of kids. They’re simply saying that at a bar on a Saturday night, there’s an assumption by *most* people that kids are not included.

    I honestly can’t believe we’re having this discussion…

  4. @Robert, come on man, this is ridiculous. You said:

    > “If you want an adult night out, go to a Playboy party.”

    Wow. So when my wife and I leave the baby with the in-laws and head out with another couple to get away from the kids for a while, the only viable destination has to be sponsored by Playboy? Or when I want date night with the wife, the movie we see should be softcore porn? That’s beyond foolish, and hopefully you don’t actually mean it.

    “Photography should be a family affair and you should expect to have kids involved.”

    This seems fairly obvious, but you know that Photography and Flickr aren’t one in the same, right? That’d be like saying the Facebook party at SXSW equates to the use of social networking.

    (As a side note, I didn’t hear you complaining about kids not being allowed at the FB SXSW party…)

    “Not to mention that my son isn’t your usual kid and is very respectful of adults. Even last night he didn’t get involved in trying to get into the party and waited quietly outside.”

    Bravo. You’ve taught your kid great manners, congrats. Seriously. But beyond that, A-List power doesn’t (or shouldn’t) equate to different treatment.

    The craziest thing in this thread, however is this line:
    “If you say you don’t want my son around because you want to be ‘child free’ then that’s an attack on me and my family.”

    Absolutely, unquestionably false. Wrong, wrong, wrong. This is an aggressively foolish argument to try to make – no one is “attacking” you, your son, or your family by saying they want to attend an event free of kids. They’re simply saying that at a bar on a Saturday night, there’s an assumption by *most* people that kids are not included.

    I honestly can’t believe we’re having this discussion…

  5. Nicole: it was a Saturday evening party, which threw me off even more. I thought they were doing that so families could celebrate Flickr’s Fourth Birthday. The fact that it was a birthday party threw me off, too. If it were a press conference it’d have been on Tuesday evening and I probably would never have wanted to bring Patrick to it. Patrick loves Flickr, so we thought it’d be really fun to go.

  6. Nicole: it was a Saturday evening party, which threw me off even more. I thought they were doing that so families could celebrate Flickr’s Fourth Birthday. The fact that it was a birthday party threw me off, too. If it were a press conference it’d have been on Tuesday evening and I probably would never have wanted to bring Patrick to it. Patrick loves Flickr, so we thought it’d be really fun to go.

  7. I’d be happy to email it to you. I don’t remember it saying 21-and-over when I clicked Approve on Upcoming. I add dozens of stuff to my Upcoming calendar every night and might have forgotten. The email was the one that was in my face, and was on my calendar.

  8. I’d be happy to email it to you. I don’t remember it saying 21-and-over when I clicked Approve on Upcoming. I add dozens of stuff to my Upcoming calendar every night and might have forgotten. The email was the one that was in my face, and was on my calendar.

  9. Have we seen a copy of said invite?

    Since you push Upcoming to know where to find you, when marking “attend” on the event, did the invite change from what’s there now? Pretty clearly states “Please note that this venue is 21 and above. You’ll need photo ID to gain admittance at the door.”

  10. Have we seen a copy of said invite?

    Since you push Upcoming to know where to find you, when marking “attend” on the event, did the invite change from what’s there now? Pretty clearly states “Please note that this venue is 21 and above. You’ll need photo ID to gain admittance at the door.”

  11. Just a reminder: adults only is not enough. It should explicitly say 21+ – because for international visitors this may come as a surprise if they do not know about the strict requirement to be 21.

    In Germany one is considered adult by 18 – and I know more than one story where people had a bad time in their visit to the states because they could not enjoy their time because suddenly they where “childreen” again.

    Wether or not an evening pary (it was, right?) is the right space for somebody like Patrick, it should have said so on the invitation just to avoid problems even with some older guys who are like 20. :)

  12. Just a reminder: adults only is not enough. It should explicitly say 21+ – because for international visitors this may come as a surprise if they do not know about the strict requirement to be 21.

    In Germany one is considered adult by 18 – and I know more than one story where people had a bad time in their visit to the states because they could not enjoy their time because suddenly they where “childreen” again.

    Wether or not an evening pary (it was, right?) is the right space for somebody like Patrick, it should have said so on the invitation just to avoid problems even with some older guys who are like 20. :)

  13. Deciding unilaterally that “Photography should be family friendly” seems like a big jump. I’m sure more than just “families” use “photography” for things.

    You sound like a petulant jerk: “It wasn’t the way I wanted it to be, so it sucks and should be changed.”

    Honestly, you’re becoming more histrionic by the day.

  14. Deciding unilaterally that “Photography should be family friendly” seems like a big jump. I’m sure more than just “families” use “photography” for things.

    You sound like a petulant jerk: “It wasn’t the way I wanted it to be, so it sucks and should be changed.”

    Honestly, you’re becoming more histrionic by the day.

  15. I guess I’m missing why having a corporate/users party at a “21 & up” venue is a misstep. When the invite was posted five weeks ago, it was pretty clear — 21 and up.

    I think it would be a mistake to infer some kind of wide-ranging anti-family agenda.

  16. I guess I’m missing why having a corporate/users party at a “21 & up” venue is a misstep. When the invite was posted five weeks ago, it was pretty clear — 21 and up.

    I think it would be a mistake to infer some kind of wide-ranging anti-family agenda.

  17. Jeremy: I’ve taken my son to dozens of events and this is the first time he’s been unwelcome (or I wasn’t warned ahead of time). I guess the brand promise of Flickr just made it sound like something where kids would be celebrated. No biggie, it got me off my ass to look at the competition again (which is VERY nice) and it also got me to realize I’m going to have to ask every time to avoid wasting time. Either way, I had a nice evening with my son and saw a movie I wouldn’t have seen if they had let me in.

  18. Jeremy: I’ve taken my son to dozens of events and this is the first time he’s been unwelcome (or I wasn’t warned ahead of time). I guess the brand promise of Flickr just made it sound like something where kids would be celebrated. No biggie, it got me off my ass to look at the competition again (which is VERY nice) and it also got me to realize I’m going to have to ask every time to avoid wasting time. Either way, I had a nice evening with my son and saw a movie I wouldn’t have seen if they had let me in.

  19. Hmm.. I was kinda laughing along with you at the beginning of the comment thread Robert, but you are fighting so hard on this that I am in disagreement with you. When it comes to companies and their parties, the DEFAULT is that its not kid-friendly, and I am surprised that you don’t assume this…

  20. Hmm.. I was kinda laughing along with you at the beginning of the comment thread Robert, but you are fighting so hard on this that I am in disagreement with you. When it comes to companies and their parties, the DEFAULT is that its not kid-friendly, and I am surprised that you don’t assume this…

  21. In fact, having read the community guidelines and yahoo’s TOS, I see nothing to back up your claim. More spouting about things you’re not sure about?

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