The changeosphere

The blog world is seeing more change right now than I’ve seen in years.

Mike Arrington is close to those changes, and reports on some of them (money, linking, and cliques).

Mark Cuban caused a bunch of noise a few days back by writing that newspapers shouldn’t call their blogs “blogs” because it destroys their brand. Hey, I agree with that. FastCompanyLive is really my videoblog, but I don’t call it that. Cuban followed it up with another post that’s very astute. Says what matters is why you do what you do.

Mike Arrington, again, told us about stats that Yahoo Buzz brings blogs (millions of readers). I find it interesting that bloggers are interested in the huge audiences. I really don’t care, I want the right audience, not a large one (believe it or not, so does my sponsor, Seagate).

And then there’s the FriendFeed thing. That’s bringing me a bigger change in the people I’m reading than I’ve seen in many years.

If you are a blogger, or a blog reader (hey) are you seeing changes?

61 thoughts on “The changeosphere

  1. Much of the adoption growth in corporate arena unfortunately involves renaming the “press releases” section of their website to “blog” website and just doing the same thing they’re always done. Bleh.

  2. Much of the adoption growth in corporate arena unfortunately involves renaming the “press releases” section of their website to “blog” website and just doing the same thing they’re always done. Bleh.

  3. The classic shell con-game.

    When numbers low, claim elite right-sized right people audiences, when numbers high, bet on all tables, and stake claims in the fact that you were here before anyone else, and obviously so much smarter, as you saw it all coming well well beforehand. Play it that way, and you can never lose. Down, everyone is more important, but Up and you are more important still, as you forecasted it all.

    Low – keyword themes: ‘elite’, ‘smarter’, ‘more important than you peasantry riff raff’, ‘we matter’, ‘our votes count for more’.

    Up – keyword themes: ‘trend’, ‘evangelist’, Go Dave Winerish, ‘I invented it or thought it all up’, ‘knew it before you’, ‘I was blogging when blogging wasn’t cool’. ‘Took you long enough, stupid as you are’.

  4. The classic shell con-game.

    When numbers low, claim elite right-sized right people audiences, when numbers high, bet on all tables, and stake claims in the fact that you were here before anyone else, and obviously so much smarter, as you saw it all coming well well beforehand. Play it that way, and you can never lose. Down, everyone is more important, but Up and you are more important still, as you forecasted it all.

    Low – keyword themes: ‘elite’, ‘smarter’, ‘more important than you peasantry riff raff’, ‘we matter’, ‘our votes count for more’.

    Up – keyword themes: ‘trend’, ‘evangelist’, Go Dave Winerish, ‘I invented it or thought it all up’, ‘knew it before you’, ‘I was blogging when blogging wasn’t cool’. ‘Took you long enough, stupid as you are’.

  5. Totally spot on about “the right audience” versus a large one.

    First thing I look at in my stats is where my hits come from.

    When I see NTIA, FCC, Google, Facebook, US Congress, etc, I know I’m doing what I need to do.

    Some DC publications have “limited audiences” but you know what? Everyone who matters reads them. Getting into National Journal is a pretty big deal, not so much if you hit the Examiner’s “Yeas and Nays” section.

  6. Totally spot on about “the right audience” versus a large one.

    First thing I look at in my stats is where my hits come from.

    When I see NTIA, FCC, Google, Facebook, US Congress, etc, I know I’m doing what I need to do.

    Some DC publications have “limited audiences” but you know what? Everyone who matters reads them. Getting into National Journal is a pretty big deal, not so much if you hit the Examiner’s “Yeas and Nays” section.

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