How our digital lives are spreading out

Visit my FriendFeed and you’ll see why I’m blogging less (it shows you what I’ve been generating on other services). When I started this blog in 2000 there wasn’t Twitter. Wasn’t Upcoming.org. Wasn’t Google Reader. Wasn’t Flickr. Wasn’t YouTube. Wasn’t Seesmic. Etc. Etc.

I’m off to attend and speak at the Next Web Conference in Amsterdam. My talk’s theme? The new “Friend Divide.” We’ll take a look at several services and apps and discuss the implications of the new divide between those who have lots of friends and those who don’t have many at all (or who aren’t using software like FriendFeed/Upcoming/Flickr, etc).

Also, notice another trend: you are moving your comments over to FriendFeed as well. The comments I’m getting over on FriendFeed are increasingly more interesting and from more diverse group of people than happen here on my own blog. That’s an interesting trend. Some bloggers are getting pissed off because of that (because they think they need the conversation to happen on their own blog). Me? I don’t mind where the conversation happens, I’ll participate there.

102 thoughts on “How our digital lives are spreading out

  1. While Sandor explains why he’s against Obama’s plan for the full auction of credits, his greatest priority is getting mandatory cap and trade in thrift savings plan place, whatever the framework. Undoubtedly, this would be a great boon to the CCX, and Sandor says he believes it’s coming.

  2. While Sandor explains why he’s against Obama’s plan for the full auction of credits, his greatest priority is getting mandatory cap and trade in thrift savings plan place, whatever the framework. Undoubtedly, this would be a great boon to the CCX, and Sandor says he believes it’s coming.

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