How our digital lives are spreading out

Visit my FriendFeed and you’ll see why I’m blogging less (it shows you what I’ve been generating on other services). When I started this blog in 2000 there wasn’t Twitter. Wasn’t Upcoming.org. Wasn’t Google Reader. Wasn’t Flickr. Wasn’t YouTube. Wasn’t Seesmic. Etc. Etc.

I’m off to attend and speak at the Next Web Conference in Amsterdam. My talk’s theme? The new “Friend Divide.” We’ll take a look at several services and apps and discuss the implications of the new divide between those who have lots of friends and those who don’t have many at all (or who aren’t using software like FriendFeed/Upcoming/Flickr, etc).

Also, notice another trend: you are moving your comments over to FriendFeed as well. The comments I’m getting over on FriendFeed are increasingly more interesting and from more diverse group of people than happen here on my own blog. That’s an interesting trend. Some bloggers are getting pissed off because of that (because they think they need the conversation to happen on their own blog). Me? I don’t mind where the conversation happens, I’ll participate there.

Comments

  1. Makes sense to me. I think it’s good that you are on all these other services, so we can infact learn from your experiences and try new things.

    I do feel that blogging is more important than any social network though. Social networks aren’t truly “your own” whereas a blog is all yours.

  2. Makes sense to me. I think it’s good that you are on all these other services, so we can infact learn from your experiences and try new things.

    I do feel that blogging is more important than any social network though. Social networks aren’t truly “your own” whereas a blog is all yours.

  3. The biggest drawback of commenting on FriendFeed is that the author may not know about the comments. Let’s say that I share this post in Google Reader, this sharing therefore becomes an item in FriendFeed, and a conversation breaks out as a result of my sharing the item. Chances are that you’re not going to find that conversation.

    For this reason, I try (but do not always succeed) to practice what I refer to as Corvida’s Law, in which you make a conscious effort to post your thoughts on the original article before you post my thoughts on FriendFeed (or anywhere else, for that matter).

    Until there’s some easy way to retrieve all of these comments from all of these sources, Corvida’s Law might be a good law to follow.

  4. The biggest drawback of commenting on FriendFeed is that the author may not know about the comments. Let’s say that I share this post in Google Reader, this sharing therefore becomes an item in FriendFeed, and a conversation breaks out as a result of my sharing the item. Chances are that you’re not going to find that conversation.

    For this reason, I try (but do not always succeed) to practice what I refer to as Corvida’s Law, in which you make a conscious effort to post your thoughts on the original article before you post my thoughts on FriendFeed (or anywhere else, for that matter).

    Until there’s some easy way to retrieve all of these comments from all of these sources, Corvida’s Law might be a good law to follow.

  5. Sorry, Robert, I’m not following you to those places… I have too much work and my time (attention) is scarce as it is to really read my RSS feeds.

    I’m not suprised by you though. You are, of course, a technology shaker and mover. But what I don’t understand is that you are paying less attention to the blogging medium that has given you the career you have now.

    Yea, change is good, new technology is good, but give us a break — I’m sticking to the “One Year Scoble Rule” (http://scobleizer.com/2008/03/18/the-techmeme-killer-or-the-google-reader-killer/).

  6. Sorry, Robert, I’m not following you to those places… I have too much work and my time (attention) is scarce as it is to really read my RSS feeds.

    I’m not suprised by you though. You are, of course, a technology shaker and mover. But what I don’t understand is that you are paying less attention to the blogging medium that has given you the career you have now.

    Yea, change is good, new technology is good, but give us a break — I’m sticking to the “One Year Scoble Rule” (http://scobleizer.com/2008/03/18/the-techmeme-killer-or-the-google-reader-killer/).

  7. I also find it interesting that things are moving in that direction, but there are divides in other areas as well. Whilst I’m informed in general, most of my friends are less so, and I’ve barely convinced some of them to start reading my blog as it is. Getting them onto Twitter, Flickr, Upcoming and reading RSS feeds is a little too much, especially when they have Facebook tiding them over until it dies a death of crap Applications. Something new on the social scene as far as who your friends/contacts/acquaintances are needs to arise and soon. I have my own ideas, but not the time or money to work on them, which is a shame.

    Regarding comments, I’ve often thought some combination of XMLRPC and RSS could be used to keep comments nicely synchronised – if I blog about a Flickr photo then I’m very unsure where the comments deserve to be and it seems a shame that either site is deprived of peoples’ opinions. Maybe if it were _all_ done via FriendFeed. Maybe if they allowed me to post a comment to there from this blog or something. Worth looking into.

  8. I also find it interesting that things are moving in that direction, but there are divides in other areas as well. Whilst I’m informed in general, most of my friends are less so, and I’ve barely convinced some of them to start reading my blog as it is. Getting them onto Twitter, Flickr, Upcoming and reading RSS feeds is a little too much, especially when they have Facebook tiding them over until it dies a death of crap Applications. Something new on the social scene as far as who your friends/contacts/acquaintances are needs to arise and soon. I have my own ideas, but not the time or money to work on them, which is a shame.

    Regarding comments, I’ve often thought some combination of XMLRPC and RSS could be used to keep comments nicely synchronised – if I blog about a Flickr photo then I’m very unsure where the comments deserve to be and it seems a shame that either site is deprived of peoples’ opinions. Maybe if it were _all_ done via FriendFeed. Maybe if they allowed me to post a comment to there from this blog or something. Worth looking into.

  9. Sometimes things go down to the lowest common denominator. Bloggers were already thought to be (by some) less serious than MSM, and now the blog is too long.
    Years ago people had face to face conversations and read books, etc. Radio became an important factor (more passive), then TV (passive, shorter attention). I think that some of this fracturing of attention is really a multitasking, due to a proliferation of information and information overload.
    Good luck in Amersterdam. Robert, you are everywhere (not only in the blogosphere but real life too). You’re not cloned are you?

  10. Sometimes things go down to the lowest common denominator. Bloggers were already thought to be (by some) less serious than MSM, and now the blog is too long.
    Years ago people had face to face conversations and read books, etc. Radio became an important factor (more passive), then TV (passive, shorter attention). I think that some of this fracturing of attention is really a multitasking, due to a proliferation of information and information overload.
    Good luck in Amersterdam. Robert, you are everywhere (not only in the blogosphere but real life too). You’re not cloned are you?

  11. Robert, by moving from Microsoft to PodTech to Fast Company, as most recent example, you’ve demonstrated a willingness to be at the cutting edge — to be at the forefront of the digital divide as opposed to the back end. Wherever the growing action is (true early adopter and key influencer) there you will be.
    As a result, you’re not tied to a certain app or platform, including blogging. No one can swim against the tide of where the market is going (think Wall Street), one would be trampled to ignore public sentiment — but we must avoid also, if you agree, becoming like the politician who does everything by poll in regard to what is popular and advantageous at the moment. Leadership, including tech leadership, also involves advocacy based upon principles as well. Of course the two approaches are not mutually exclusive by any means.

  12. Robert, by moving from Microsoft to PodTech to Fast Company, as most recent example, you’ve demonstrated a willingness to be at the cutting edge — to be at the forefront of the digital divide as opposed to the back end. Wherever the growing action is (true early adopter and key influencer) there you will be.
    As a result, you’re not tied to a certain app or platform, including blogging. No one can swim against the tide of where the market is going (think Wall Street), one would be trampled to ignore public sentiment — but we must avoid also, if you agree, becoming like the politician who does everything by poll in regard to what is popular and advantageous at the moment. Leadership, including tech leadership, also involves advocacy based upon principles as well. Of course the two approaches are not mutually exclusive by any means.

  13. Robert, while I praise your willingness to try all of these technologies out, keep in mind that’s why we read you in the first place. I don’t have the time (nor the inclination in some areas) to stay on top of all of these form factors. If you expect this technology to ever go mainstream, you and the rest of the 2.0-ers will have to at some point commit to your preferred platform.

    You can say embrace change or get out of the way. Unfortunately, those of us that live outside of evangelist-land have to you put your ADD-explorations into action. The constant disruption is not a sustainable business model, for the Enterprise or for Small Business. Please keep having the conversations you’re having, but don’t assume your audience is a “Scoble clone.”

  14. Robert, while I praise your willingness to try all of these technologies out, keep in mind that’s why we read you in the first place. I don’t have the time (nor the inclination in some areas) to stay on top of all of these form factors. If you expect this technology to ever go mainstream, you and the rest of the 2.0-ers will have to at some point commit to your preferred platform.

    You can say embrace change or get out of the way. Unfortunately, those of us that live outside of evangelist-land have to you put your ADD-explorations into action. The constant disruption is not a sustainable business model, for the Enterprise or for Small Business. Please keep having the conversations you’re having, but don’t assume your audience is a “Scoble clone.”

  15. While I agree that technology moves on and new exciting things happen, I think of a blog/site like it’s your retail establishment (your brand). Even though you might be getting product from all over the world, it’s all consolidated in your store. If a merchant made their customer go to location X to get product A and location Y to get product B, etc., and that’s ever changing, the customer would be long gone. There needs to be a way to consolidate all your tech into your home base, your blog/site. The blog needs to be a full menu restaurant, not appetizers here, main course there, and desert someplace else.

  16. While I agree that technology moves on and new exciting things happen, I think of a blog/site like it’s your retail establishment (your brand). Even though you might be getting product from all over the world, it’s all consolidated in your store. If a merchant made their customer go to location X to get product A and location Y to get product B, etc., and that’s ever changing, the customer would be long gone. There needs to be a way to consolidate all your tech into your home base, your blog/site. The blog needs to be a full menu restaurant, not appetizers here, main course there, and desert someplace else.

  17. Robert.

    See if Disqus can do commenting for you as you wish. It would only let me use disqus for NEW comments only, on blogs without them .. but I am sure for someone like you they could find a way around it ;)

    That way you can also bring your comments into FriendFeed.

    Worth a try anyway.. BTW I’m nothing to do with disqus… just like what they do

  18. Robert.

    See if Disqus can do commenting for you as you wish. It would only let me use disqus for NEW comments only, on blogs without them .. but I am sure for someone like you they could find a way around it ;)

    That way you can also bring your comments into FriendFeed.

    Worth a try anyway.. BTW I’m nothing to do with disqus… just like what they do

  19. re: Amsterdam

    What a beautiful City. Hope you get out of the conference rooms long enough to enjoy it.

    Say hi to the fine folks at the Bulldog.

  20. re: Amsterdam

    What a beautiful City. Hope you get out of the conference rooms long enough to enjoy it.

    Say hi to the fine folks at the Bulldog.

  21. This is an exciting trend! I guess, we would end up with well organized interface to read/write in all types of social network. I was not able to track/follow-up my comments, forum posts etc. so I have copy/pasted few of them to my blog, it’s hectic.

    Again Google gets the tail (previously words, now “the conversation”).

    “Some bloggers are getting pissed off because of that (because they think they need the conversation to happen on their own blog).
    why should they worry? they could relay it by using a widget.

  22. This is an exciting trend! I guess, we would end up with well organized interface to read/write in all types of social network. I was not able to track/follow-up my comments, forum posts etc. so I have copy/pasted few of them to my blog, it’s hectic.

    Again Google gets the tail (previously words, now “the conversation”).

    “Some bloggers are getting pissed off because of that (because they think they need the conversation to happen on their own blog).
    why should they worry? they could relay it by using a widget.

  23. Why can’t you just use something like marsedit and post your thoughts to all your blogs, sites in a couple of clicks?

    Don’t lose this audience (the wordpress blog readers), its hard to get it back.

  24. Why can’t you just use something like marsedit and post your thoughts to all your blogs, sites in a couple of clicks?

    Don’t lose this audience (the wordpress blog readers), its hard to get it back.

  25. Enjoy getting locked into your data silo over there…

    I will be hesitant to use one of these aggregation things until I can host it on my own server.

  26. Robert,

    Not everyone is a massive information processor like you. I think that the conversation needs to be reaggregated and portable so people can participate and consume whereever they are.

    Blogging is hard work and the blogger should be rewarded with the content on their own blog. I want to know my readers and I want the comments on my blog.

    So I agree with the pissed off bloggers and don’t agree with you even though I respect that you have taken the high road on this!

    But rather than get pissed off, I’ve just set up a bunch of google alerts on my blog names, my company names, my personal name, my @twitter name, so I can follow the conversation where it goes.

    @elliottng

  27. Robert,

    Not everyone is a massive information processor like you. I think that the conversation needs to be reaggregated and portable so people can participate and consume whereever they are.

    Blogging is hard work and the blogger should be rewarded with the content on their own blog. I want to know my readers and I want the comments on my blog.

    So I agree with the pissed off bloggers and don’t agree with you even though I respect that you have taken the high road on this!

    But rather than get pissed off, I’ve just set up a bunch of google alerts on my blog names, my company names, my personal name, my @twitter name, so I can follow the conversation where it goes.

    @elliottng

  28. Enjoy getting locked into your data silo over there…

    I will be hesitant to use one of these aggregation things until I can host it on my own server.

  29. Who needs another echo chanmber of the same over-exposed people? Is this progress? I’m looking for relevancy. I didn’t see it in my 5 minutes logging into Friendfeed today…maybe I’m missing something?

  30. Who needs another echo chanmber of the same over-exposed people? Is this progress? I’m looking for relevancy. I didn’t see it in my 5 minutes logging into Friendfeed today…maybe I’m missing something?

  31. The problem with trying to get everyone to comment on your page is that you might find out how boring you really are.

    And trying to claim ownership of a comment? Your name is next to every comment, right? If you are going to feel that way about it, then you might be better off not commenting at all.

    This capitalist mindset is creating an articial society, with artificial relations, all for the almighty Buck. It is a manipulation of Natural Selection. These inflated Ego’s are making wannabe-Gods out of all of us.

    We can learn a few things from the Samurai about honour, dignity and respect. As a courtesy, when you are commenting, you can leave a link to your home at the bottom. This is never unreasonable.

    I feel it helps if one sacrifices that little bit of insight for the greater good, be it business relations or cultural unification.

    If you try too hard, you end up recycling 2nd hand info, with no real input from yourself. This also causes dry spells in rich material, which I refer to as “feeling the burn.”

    Visit Towards 42, on Facebook:
    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=10425006999

  32. The problem with trying to get everyone to comment on your page is that you might find out how boring you really are.

    And trying to claim ownership of a comment? Your name is next to every comment, right? If you are going to feel that way about it, then you might be better off not commenting at all.

    This capitalist mindset is creating an articial society, with artificial relations, all for the almighty Buck. It is a manipulation of Natural Selection. These inflated Ego’s are making wannabe-Gods out of all of us.

    We can learn a few things from the Samurai about honour, dignity and respect. As a courtesy, when you are commenting, you can leave a link to your home at the bottom. This is never unreasonable.

    I feel it helps if one sacrifices that little bit of insight for the greater good, be it business relations or cultural unification.

    If you try too hard, you end up recycling 2nd hand info, with no real input from yourself. This also causes dry spells in rich material, which I refer to as “feeling the burn.”

    Visit Towards 42, on Facebook:
    http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=10425006999

  33. Robert, great thoughts – always great thoughts. I have to wonder if it is simply a convenience thing.

    Not to defile the comments or commentors themselves, the act of commenting is much like bird droppings to me in that people will leave them wherever they frequent.

    Whatever medium is most convenient and what people are use to they will use. I suppose that’s why faxing technology still exists today and is widely used – a lowest common denominator of sorts.

    You have talked me in to trying this however, as I was just talking with Dan Keldsen over at BizTalkTech on this very subject yesterday! Great timing as always:

    http://www.changeforge.com/?p=45

  34. Robert, great thoughts – always great thoughts. I have to wonder if it is simply a convenience thing.

    Not to defile the comments or commentors themselves, the act of commenting is much like bird droppings to me in that people will leave them wherever they frequent.

    Whatever medium is most convenient and what people are use to they will use. I suppose that’s why faxing technology still exists today and is widely used – a lowest common denominator of sorts.

    You have talked me in to trying this however, as I was just talking with Dan Keldsen over at BizTalkTech on this very subject yesterday! Great timing as always:

    http://www.changeforge.com/?p=45

  35. Perhaps the arrival of friendfeed and other similar services clearly signals that blogs have reached past their prime?

  36. Perhaps the arrival of friendfeed and other similar services clearly signals that blogs have reached past their prime?

  37. yes everyone is going into the didgital age i have a didgital video phone so i see who im talking to not just hear their voices over a phone line I SEE THEM its amazing

  38. yes everyone is going into the didgital age i have a didgital video phone so i see who im talking to not just hear their voices over a phone line I SEE THEM its amazing

  39. The trouble with technology geeks is that they are in lala land with their assumptions. People still use fax machines because they are easy to use and serve a purpose. People still use those old simple telephones that they’ve had in their house for the past 20 years because the technology works and is simple to use.

    Scoble is on the way far bleading edge and technology adoption isn’t going to happen over night. The mainstream is just now “getting” the Internet.

    I found Ken’s comment, “the act of commenting is much like bird droppings to me in that people will leave them wherever they frequent,” ironic seeing how he left his poopoo here… Commenting, it’s so last year.

    You know, to be honest with you, all this “new” Web 2.0 technology is great. It gives the VC’s a place to employ well meaning people. But what matters is how will these startups find real revenue streams and sustain them for years to come. That boring old telephone technology that A.G. Bell invented a century ago is still bringing in revenue around the world. Hell, I’ll be impressed if Facebook, Friendfeed and the lot of these social expierments are around in ten years.

  40. The trouble with technology geeks is that they are in lala land with their assumptions. People still use fax machines because they are easy to use and serve a purpose. People still use those old simple telephones that they’ve had in their house for the past 20 years because the technology works and is simple to use.

    Scoble is on the way far bleading edge and technology adoption isn’t going to happen over night. The mainstream is just now “getting” the Internet.

    I found Ken’s comment, “the act of commenting is much like bird droppings to me in that people will leave them wherever they frequent,” ironic seeing how he left his poopoo here… Commenting, it’s so last year.

    You know, to be honest with you, all this “new” Web 2.0 technology is great. It gives the VC’s a place to employ well meaning people. But what matters is how will these startups find real revenue streams and sustain them for years to come. That boring old telephone technology that A.G. Bell invented a century ago is still bringing in revenue around the world. Hell, I’ll be impressed if Facebook, Friendfeed and the lot of these social expierments are around in ten years.

  41. My biggest concern with FF, FB, Twitter, and most other sites that want to host my conversations is that some of them are going to go under and take my conversations with them.

    The Social Media I am going to get excited about is the one that makes it easy for me to make a back-up of both sides of any conversation I am a part of.

    Also it took us forever to get a working blog search. How on earth do we find the conversations we are interested in now that they are spread all over the place?

  42. My biggest concern with FF, FB, Twitter, and most other sites that want to host my conversations is that some of them are going to go under and take my conversations with them.

    The Social Media I am going to get excited about is the one that makes it easy for me to make a back-up of both sides of any conversation I am a part of.

    Also it took us forever to get a working blog search. How on earth do we find the conversations we are interested in now that they are spread all over the place?

  43. Hi Robert
    I prefer your blog to a conversation held elsewhere. It’s like a party that you are hosting, instead of floating around at other events.

    You make a great host.

  44. Hi Robert
    I prefer your blog to a conversation held elsewhere. It’s like a party that you are hosting, instead of floating around at other events.

    You make a great host.

  45. I think that blogging is still the best way to develop the conversations and idea. But yes, there is Twitter, Google Reader (do u know the gReader extension? you can send comment on Google Reader with Disqus) Flickr, FriendFeed: this is a part of our digital identity that we can summarize in the blog.

  46. I think that blogging is still the best way to develop the conversations and idea. But yes, there is Twitter, Google Reader (do u know the gReader extension? you can send comment on Google Reader with Disqus) Flickr, FriendFeed: this is a part of our digital identity that we can summarize in the blog.

  47. So does your friend feed quickly become your main digital identity online?

    If there is going to be one place online that is Justin Thorp, I’d rather it not be part of one centralized system. My blog is the center of my online identity and everything branches out from there.

    FriendFeed is too much of a centralized decentralized social network.

  48. So does your friend feed quickly become your main digital identity online?

    If there is going to be one place online that is Justin Thorp, I’d rather it not be part of one centralized system. My blog is the center of my online identity and everything branches out from there.

    FriendFeed is too much of a centralized decentralized social network.

  49. Commenting on your blog post to say that the discussions on FriendFeed and Twitter this past week have been much more dynamic and interesting than those in the comments on your blog in the last week.

    I finally opened a FriendFeed account and started following people immediately – I feel like I have a much better pulse on what is going on on a daily basis in the tech industry.

    FriendFeed is almost like a 24 hour CNN or Stock Market TV program…except it has news you care about!

  50. Commenting on your blog post to say that the discussions on FriendFeed and Twitter this past week have been much more dynamic and interesting than those in the comments on your blog in the last week.

    I finally opened a FriendFeed account and started following people immediately – I feel like I have a much better pulse on what is going on on a daily basis in the tech industry.

    FriendFeed is almost like a 24 hour CNN or Stock Market TV program…except it has news you care about!

  51. It’s just more ways to talk to yourself and fellow worshipers. The conversations are all so much fluff and randomness, but at least, in the past, some blog posts have been well-written thought-pieces, now everything is either straining-to-make-a-point quickie posts, controversially sensational or a mere pointers to things done elsewhere, as so many other new-new-hot-hot things to focus the short attention spans on.

    Friend Divide? How seriously condescending. Just because some people don’t play gotta-collect-them-all Pokemon games with software Social Services doesn’t mean they don’t have friends, in fact offline, the friendships are wider, deeper, richer and more focused on things other than the latest Web 2.0 or Web-personality-cult of the moment. Besides, you (personally) don’t so much as “have” friends in these spaces, as much to “broadcast” to them.

  52. It’s just more ways to talk to yourself and fellow worshipers. The conversations are all so much fluff and randomness, but at least, in the past, some blog posts have been well-written thought-pieces, now everything is either straining-to-make-a-point quickie posts, controversially sensational or a mere pointers to things done elsewhere, as so many other new-new-hot-hot things to focus the short attention spans on.

    Friend Divide? How seriously condescending. Just because some people don’t play gotta-collect-them-all Pokemon games with software Social Services doesn’t mean they don’t have friends, in fact offline, the friendships are wider, deeper, richer and more focused on things other than the latest Web 2.0 or Web-personality-cult of the moment. Besides, you (personally) don’t so much as “have” friends in these spaces, as much to “broadcast” to them.

  53. Wow.. I certainly had these ideas for a long time.

    I’ve definitely been able to implement many of them (where else can you uniformly Comment/Tag Search Results or Feed Items and share with friends, or Post to Topics, all within an overarching framework of interconnected Memes..?)

    I just never had enough in the way of friends.. Stayed away from Facebook because I wanted to code.. Always though MySpace was ugly.. Had a couple friends who coded with me but got tired..

    Its clear that the will to code and good ideas simply aren’t enough.. I’ve slowly watched Google implement things I had going (Notes on Search Results..? Search History?)

    Damn you Titans!! :)

  54. Wow.. I certainly had these ideas for a long time.

    I’ve definitely been able to implement many of them (where else can you uniformly Comment/Tag Search Results or Feed Items and share with friends, or Post to Topics, all within an overarching framework of interconnected Memes..?)

    I just never had enough in the way of friends.. Stayed away from Facebook because I wanted to code.. Always though MySpace was ugly.. Had a couple friends who coded with me but got tired..

    Its clear that the will to code and good ideas simply aren’t enough.. I’ve slowly watched Google implement things I had going (Notes on Search Results..? Search History?)

    Damn you Titans!! :)

  55. The friend divide reminds me a lot of the talk in the early 90s about the global village. I think it turned out that some people live perfectly content only having real connections to people, while others prefer the virtual connects made through Twitter and the like. I’d be interested to hear how many people you have real connections with that you meet in Amsterdam.

  56. The friend divide reminds me a lot of the talk in the early 90s about the global village. I think it turned out that some people live perfectly content only having real connections to people, while others prefer the virtual connects made through Twitter and the like. I’d be interested to hear how many people you have real connections with that you meet in Amsterdam.

  57. I do not know what services do FriendFeed and Twitter will offer in the future. But it is pretty interesting how social network sites go bloom..I wonder what will they offer next or will they offer good addon services on it.
    -W3G

  58. I do not know what services do FriendFeed and Twitter will offer in the future. But it is pretty interesting how social network sites go bloom..I wonder what will they offer next or will they offer good addon services on it.
    -W3G

  59. Your self-absorbed narcissism has reached a new high.

    My prediction: your readership has peaked.

  60. Your self-absorbed narcissism has reached a new high.

    My prediction: your readership has peaked.

  61. Robert,

    A “friend divide” that is new one to me. I would love it if the Internet friends were my “real” friends but since many of these “friends” use social networking as a marketing tool it is hard to believe that I would consider them real friends. Do you actually meet any of these friends in real life? I am sure that the vast majority of them you have never met in person, like myself. I would have a beer with you if i met you in person but since your such a globe trotter then i do not see that happening. Just my thoughts on the subject.

  62. Robert,

    A “friend divide” that is new one to me. I would love it if the Internet friends were my “real” friends but since many of these “friends” use social networking as a marketing tool it is hard to believe that I would consider them real friends. Do you actually meet any of these friends in real life? I am sure that the vast majority of them you have never met in person, like myself. I would have a beer with you if i met you in person but since your such a globe trotter then i do not see that happening. Just my thoughts on the subject.

  63. Here at BigOven.com, a social network about food, we just went live with FriendFeed support. Using the FriendFeed API was quite simple and straightforward, and it appears to work well.

    BigOven is a social network about food, and will automatically place notices on your FriendFeed (with your permission, of course) when you rave about a recipe, post a cooking video to the site, post a photo, or receive a medal from another user for something great you’ve done in the community.

    What it means for sites like us is not only a development-cost savings (not having to roll our own friending/broadcast platform), but also to be able to participate in a much, much bigger platform. I argued that Microsoft ought to buy FriendFeed (or ShareThing) immediately and drop the Yahoo bid, on my blog recently.

  64. Here at BigOven.com, a social network about food, we just went live with FriendFeed support. Using the FriendFeed API was quite simple and straightforward, and it appears to work well.

    BigOven is a social network about food, and will automatically place notices on your FriendFeed (with your permission, of course) when you rave about a recipe, post a cooking video to the site, post a photo, or receive a medal from another user for something great you’ve done in the community.

    What it means for sites like us is not only a development-cost savings (not having to roll our own friending/broadcast platform), but also to be able to participate in a much, much bigger platform. I argued that Microsoft ought to buy FriendFeed (or ShareThing) immediately and drop the Yahoo bid, on my blog recently.

  65. Friendfeed: Drip Marketing 2.0?…

    I have always appreciated the concept of drip marketing. Unlike carpet bombing where you run ad campaigns in high volume forums with the hopes just 1% might be in the mood for buying your ’stuff’ … drip marketing is all about trying…

  66. You do not need to be a hero to start, however you have to start to be a hero. Good start which promises a lot of interesting things… A bottom line of this idea is “to start a conversation” and it does not matter in what blog you will have your start. Let me not to agree with you. The question here that actually bothers me is whether all blogs will be given equal opportunities and will be presented equally or some of them will be given a number of privileges and will always be in the first line. Don’t you think that it is already high time to create a platform of equal competition? May be, only then it will hardly matter where you start.

  67. You do not need to be a hero to start, however you have to start to be a hero. Good start which promises a lot of interesting things… A bottom line of this idea is “to start a conversation” and it does not matter in what blog you will have your start. Let me not to agree with you. The question here that actually bothers me is whether all blogs will be given equal opportunities and will be presented equally or some of them will be given a number of privileges and will always be in the first line. Don’t you think that it is already high time to create a platform of equal competition? May be, only then it will hardly matter where you start.

  68. Have you considered adding the Friendfeed plugin that allows you to embed those comments into your blog too? All the bits of conversation coming together.

  69. Have you considered adding the Friendfeed plugin that allows you to embed those comments into your blog too? All the bits of conversation coming together.

  70. While Sandor explains why he’s against Obama’s plan for the full auction of credits, his greatest priority is getting mandatory cap and trade in thrift savings plan place, whatever the framework. Undoubtedly, this would be a great boon to the CCX, and Sandor says he believes it’s coming.

  71. While Sandor explains why he’s against Obama’s plan for the full auction of credits, his greatest priority is getting mandatory cap and trade in thrift savings plan place, whatever the framework. Undoubtedly, this would be a great boon to the CCX, and Sandor says he believes it’s coming.