Comments

  1. There is some level of credibility to Kara’s post. My wife could care less about Twitter. So could some of my friends. A lot of people on Twitter right now are the “early adopters” and the average person doesn’t do early adoption.

    Just like with MySpace and Facebook, Twitter does offer something and it will catch on in the mainstream but it will take some time like the other social networks did.

    Kara’s friends aren’t on it yet, but they probably will be in the next couple of years.

  2. There is some level of credibility to Kara’s post. My wife could care less about Twitter. So could some of my friends. A lot of people on Twitter right now are the “early adopters” and the average person doesn’t do early adoption.

    Just like with MySpace and Facebook, Twitter does offer something and it will catch on in the mainstream but it will take some time like the other social networks did.

    Kara’s friends aren’t on it yet, but they probably will be in the next couple of years.

  3. I have people question twitter to me all the time. Yet 100% of my friends who are on it a lot have sworn by the connections they have made from their twitting.

    I have met dozens of people whom I now seem to know who do not live near by. However locally in Austin I have met dozens whom I do now know personally and who have become part of my network.

    I know a little about the power of networking and see twitter as just another tool to help build relationships. But like any tool, you need to learn how to use it and then actually use it.

    You don’t need to think back as far as the Apple II…just look back 3 years ago at blogs. Most people did not know what they were (even those who read them regularly did not know they were not just websites). Now few would admit to not knowing about Blogs.

    Twitter still has a long way to go to be mainstream, but there are many people who are using it regularly…so those who don’t still might in the near future.

    And heck, it is just fun sometimes to know what Scoble is doing at any given moment.

    thom

  4. I have people question twitter to me all the time. Yet 100% of my friends who are on it a lot have sworn by the connections they have made from their twitting.

    I have met dozens of people whom I now seem to know who do not live near by. However locally in Austin I have met dozens whom I do now know personally and who have become part of my network.

    I know a little about the power of networking and see twitter as just another tool to help build relationships. But like any tool, you need to learn how to use it and then actually use it.

    You don’t need to think back as far as the Apple II…just look back 3 years ago at blogs. Most people did not know what they were (even those who read them regularly did not know they were not just websites). Now few would admit to not knowing about Blogs.

    Twitter still has a long way to go to be mainstream, but there are many people who are using it regularly…so those who don’t still might in the near future.

    And heck, it is just fun sometimes to know what Scoble is doing at any given moment.

    thom

  5. Hey, I bought an Apple ][ back in ’79 for $2,600. Back then 16K RAM cost $300! I also got 2 floppy drives with that, but they were back-ordered because they hadn’t yet come out.

    Loved that machine. It’s what got me started in this computer thing!

  6. Hey, I bought an Apple ][ back in ’79 for $2,600. Back then 16K RAM cost $300! I also got 2 floppy drives with that, but they were back-ordered because they hadn’t yet come out.

    Loved that machine. It’s what got me started in this computer thing!

  7. I found it funny that the past 10 months my wife would ask what this twitter thingy was on the desktop when she would jump on my computer. She is a nestie. thenest.com, a website for married women. Well skip forward to last week and she asked me how to get an account because a bunch of “nesties” had accounts and she wanted to follow and become an active member in that part of the community. The question isn’t when mainstream will hit, it should be how fast the different stages of adoption will be.

  8. I found it funny that the past 10 months my wife would ask what this twitter thingy was on the desktop when she would jump on my computer. She is a nestie. thenest.com, a website for married women. Well skip forward to last week and she asked me how to get an account because a bunch of “nesties” had accounts and she wanted to follow and become an active member in that part of the community. The question isn’t when mainstream will hit, it should be how fast the different stages of adoption will be.

  9. Robert,

    You should try SocialToo.com’s Auto-Follow – it’s much better than Twitter’s. It has blacklist functionality that you can add users you don’t want it to ever follow, and it will even auto-blacklist usernames if more than 30% of the SocialToo.com userbase blacklists an individual (as that userbase grows I’ll be modifying the blacklisting algorithm).

    In addition to that, in the next couple days you’ll see the ability to send a automated, custom message to your new followers. Any other frustrations with Twitter (or any other social network for that matter) let me know and I’ll look into incorporating them – it was actually inspired by @chrispirillo and @guykawasaki mentioning their own frustrations. They were two of our first users.

    Disclaimer – I wrote SocialToo.com, if you couldn’t tell. :-)

  10. Robert,

    You should try SocialToo.com’s Auto-Follow – it’s much better than Twitter’s. It has blacklist functionality that you can add users you don’t want it to ever follow, and it will even auto-blacklist usernames if more than 30% of the SocialToo.com userbase blacklists an individual (as that userbase grows I’ll be modifying the blacklisting algorithm).

    In addition to that, in the next couple days you’ll see the ability to send a automated, custom message to your new followers. Any other frustrations with Twitter (or any other social network for that matter) let me know and I’ll look into incorporating them – it was actually inspired by @chrispirillo and @guykawasaki mentioning their own frustrations. They were two of our first users.

    Disclaimer – I wrote SocialToo.com, if you couldn’t tell. :-)

  11. I think twitter, like a lot of the social sites, are in the early adopter stage. Techies are talking about it, but I don’t know one non-tech person who has a Twitter account.

    The burden of time will determine if it is too new (more people will use) or not understood (some more will use, but not wide spread).

    However, saying you get a tweet a second isn’t exactly a fair measuring tool. You work with, meet, and blog too tech people…if you weren’t getting a tweet a second, it would mean that the service is down.
    http://scobleizer.com/2007/03/19/productivity-up-200-twitter-is-down/

  12. I think twitter, like a lot of the social sites, are in the early adopter stage. Techies are talking about it, but I don’t know one non-tech person who has a Twitter account.

    The burden of time will determine if it is too new (more people will use) or not understood (some more will use, but not wide spread).

    However, saying you get a tweet a second isn’t exactly a fair measuring tool. You work with, meet, and blog too tech people…if you weren’t getting a tweet a second, it would mean that the service is down.
    http://scobleizer.com/2007/03/19/productivity-up-200-twitter-is-down/

  13. Well, Robert, when you follow 21,227 people who are, by the fact that they got your attention are more active than average users of twiter, you’re going to get a few tweats no matter how close to dead the service is.

    Compare twitter’s numbers to the 1,000,000,000 PC users or the tens of millions of users of each of the major IM systems and get back to us.

  14. Well, Robert, when you follow 21,227 people who are, by the fact that they got your attention are more active than average users of twiter, you’re going to get a few tweats no matter how close to dead the service is.

    Compare twitter’s numbers to the 1,000,000,000 PC users or the tens of millions of users of each of the major IM systems and get back to us.

  15. I’m on twitter and I’m trying to get it … but I don’t get it. It is a good way to stay up on all the uninteresting things people do, and all the egocentric streams of consciousness. Just what every eroding society needs. Every once in a while you catch something useful. I’d say it’s about 99% noise, 1% content. OK, maybe less on the content.

    Or maybe I become exponentially more curmudgeonly the older I get. :p

  16. I’m on twitter and I’m trying to get it … but I don’t get it. It is a good way to stay up on all the uninteresting things people do, and all the egocentric streams of consciousness. Just what every eroding society needs. Every once in a while you catch something useful. I’d say it’s about 99% noise, 1% content. OK, maybe less on the content.

    Or maybe I become exponentially more curmudgeonly the older I get. :p

  17. @ Brian, I think you make an excellent point about it being a highway of ego centric babbling. Yet, at some level it offers a sense of connectedness that appeals to the digerati. That said, I’m on it, my handle is: labjuice. Now let me wander to some other remote region of the intertubes.

    Peter.

  18. @ Brian, I think you make an excellent point about it being a highway of ego centric babbling. Yet, at some level it offers a sense of connectedness that appeals to the digerati. That said, I’m on it, my handle is: labjuice. Now let me wander to some other remote region of the intertubes.

    Peter.

  19. Until a few months ago I didn’t see why people found it useful. Then I decided to check it out, mostly as a lurker. At some point it just clicked and I’m hooked on the real-time information feed. At our company we decided to build a tool to track what people are saying:

    http://twist.flaptor.com

    For example, see how much people mention this site and what they say. It’s been on the “hot concept” list twice this past week:

    http://twist.flaptor.com/?gram=scobleizer

  20. Until a few months ago I didn’t see why people found it useful. Then I decided to check it out, mostly as a lurker. At some point it just clicked and I’m hooked on the real-time information feed. At our company we decided to build a tool to track what people are saying:

    http://twist.flaptor.com

    For example, see how much people mention this site and what they say. It’s been on the “hot concept” list twice this past week:

    http://twist.flaptor.com/?gram=scobleizer

  21. Robert, I think you’re missing the main point she’s eluding to in her article. Twitters users have a very specific psychograph. So limited right now — it is not considered to be mainstream.

    So it’s a little disheartening to read your post when you “Robert Scoble” tech guru, are blind to miss the fact Twitter isn’t as popular as you assume it is. Maybe in “your world” it’s popular. But, those 21,227 people you are following is made up of a very specific psychograph. It can be said, in it’s current state, Twitter is not made up of a user base that has mass appeal like the most popular social networks (MySpace, Facebook).

    Bottom line — you can’t deny the fact Twitter mostly comprised of a user base that is “tech savvy” and generally “early adopters”. If you were to do a random poll on a street corner people would likely;

    A.) Not even know what Twitter is.
    B.) If they do know of Twitter, there’s an even less of a probability that they use the service, and use it on a regular basis.

    I can tell you coming from a person here in Kansas City, the majority of people in the Midwest have never even heard of Twitter. Furthermore, most don’t see it to be of much value to sign-up and use it. Generally speaking, only people who’s professional careers that have a direct tie or value-add, do you find actually using Twitter. It isn’t a generational gap thing either. My mom isn’t on Twitter, she’s over 50-years-old, and she does fit the profile as a technograph of a “pessimist” (Forrester Research term). My sister isn’t on Twitter either, she’s a senior in college, and very much fits the technograph of a “optimist” (Forrester Research term). I’d also know that 98% of my friends who are 20-something’s are also not on Twitter either. Nor have/did they joined after I explained the value and concept behind it.

    I personally find Twitter of value because it’s a toolset that supports my professional career while being a great compliment to augmenting my own personal social media interests. However, I do also accept the fact it has limitations as it’s own niche as a social network. I find it very hard to agree (and frankly shift uncomfortably in my seat) when Twitter Evangelists blog, post, speak on how Twitter is the “next big thing” and saying “everyone should Twitter”. It will take more than ‘performance upgrades’ to the platform to engage a mass appeal to Twitter. What is that you ask? I believe it will require an entire shift of thinking for mass personal social acceptance of the mere “concept” of Twitter.


    Ramsey
    ramsey@ramseym.com

  22. Robert, I think you’re missing the main point she’s eluding to in her article. Twitters users have a very specific psychograph. So limited right now — it is not considered to be mainstream.

    So it’s a little disheartening to read your post when you “Robert Scoble” tech guru, are blind to miss the fact Twitter isn’t as popular as you assume it is. Maybe in “your world” it’s popular. But, those 21,227 people you are following is made up of a very specific psychograph. It can be said, in it’s current state, Twitter is not made up of a user base that has mass appeal like the most popular social networks (MySpace, Facebook).

    Bottom line — you can’t deny the fact Twitter mostly comprised of a user base that is “tech savvy” and generally “early adopters”. If you were to do a random poll on a street corner people would likely;

    A.) Not even know what Twitter is.
    B.) If they do know of Twitter, there’s an even less of a probability that they use the service, and use it on a regular basis.

    I can tell you coming from a person here in Kansas City, the majority of people in the Midwest have never even heard of Twitter. Furthermore, most don’t see it to be of much value to sign-up and use it. Generally speaking, only people who’s professional careers that have a direct tie or value-add, do you find actually using Twitter. It isn’t a generational gap thing either. My mom isn’t on Twitter, she’s over 50-years-old, and she does fit the profile as a technograph of a “pessimist” (Forrester Research term). My sister isn’t on Twitter either, she’s a senior in college, and very much fits the technograph of a “optimist” (Forrester Research term). I’d also know that 98% of my friends who are 20-something’s are also not on Twitter either. Nor have/did they joined after I explained the value and concept behind it.

    I personally find Twitter of value because it’s a toolset that supports my professional career while being a great compliment to augmenting my own personal social media interests. However, I do also accept the fact it has limitations as it’s own niche as a social network. I find it very hard to agree (and frankly shift uncomfortably in my seat) when Twitter Evangelists blog, post, speak on how Twitter is the “next big thing” and saying “everyone should Twitter”. It will take more than ‘performance upgrades’ to the platform to engage a mass appeal to Twitter. What is that you ask? I believe it will require an entire shift of thinking for mass personal social acceptance of the mere “concept” of Twitter.


    Ramsey
    ramsey@ramseym.com

  23. You are a super-early adopter. Not everyone’s on Twitter. I don’t really use it at all. When I signed up initially, it was almost indecipherable as to what to do.

    Nice bumping into you and meeting you in person at Web 2.0 last Wednesday.

  24. You are a super-early adopter. Not everyone’s on Twitter. I don’t really use it at all. When I signed up initially, it was almost indecipherable as to what to do.

    Nice bumping into you and meeting you in person at Web 2.0 last Wednesday.

  25. I agree, it is early. But I find it much more appealing than I ever found Myspace/Facebooks. There is just too much with those networking sites, Twitter is simple/concise, like the good ‘ole days of AOL>AIM

  26. I agree, it is early. But I find it much more appealing than I ever found Myspace/Facebooks. There is just too much with those networking sites, Twitter is simple/concise, like the good ‘ole days of AOL>AIM

  27. When I first joined Twitter last fall, I went to see if my friends were on it. I started with my MySpace friends, who included some teenagers (former exchange students) and others who I thought fit in the Twitter demographic. I asked them if they were on Twitter, and none of them was.

    In addition, I’ve realized that my negative assessment of Twitter’s continued viability is probably wrong. The stories about the funding, the potential of Twitter breaking into the mainstream, all indicate that Twitter is still on a growth path, even though the bleeding edges have passed it by.

    My only question – if 20 million people join Twitter, are they ready?

  28. When I first joined Twitter last fall, I went to see if my friends were on it. I started with my MySpace friends, who included some teenagers (former exchange students) and others who I thought fit in the Twitter demographic. I asked them if they were on Twitter, and none of them was.

    In addition, I’ve realized that my negative assessment of Twitter’s continued viability is probably wrong. The stories about the funding, the potential of Twitter breaking into the mainstream, all indicate that Twitter is still on a growth path, even though the bleeding edges have passed it by.

    My only question – if 20 million people join Twitter, are they ready?

  29. The biggest thing people have to realize with Twitter is that it isn’t a place to connect to people you already know, it’s a place to connect to new people. And that is so hard to inform people of, because they have no one to tell them.

    Robert, sure you get a tweet / second, but how many of those people did you know personally prior to getting on Twitter? Because you are so involved in the tech world, take your number, and divide it by 1000, cause that’s everyone else’s number. Most people know 0-2 people who are on Twitter prior to signing up. I knew 0 people when I signed up, and it took me 18 months before I actually started using it on a daily basis. There is an extremely steep learning curve with Twitter, not because it is complicated, but because it is simple, almost too simple. People don’t inherently “get” it.

    I don’t know what will push Twitter into the mainstream, but like Ramsey said, something will have to shift in the way people perceive social networks before that happens. The first thing people do on Myspace/facebook is add their friends. 99.99999999% of people can’t add more than 1 or 2 people on Twitter, and that’s the biggest drawback with the service right now. The vast majority of voices on Twitter are those the tech world early adoptees. My gf signed up for twitter at my urging, but she’s still kinda lost with what to do, and there’s really no one of interest for her to follow aside from getting local weather updates or CNN’s breaking news feed.

    The change will occur when something radically different occurs than what we have now. Desktop apps (Twitterific / Twhirl) threw Twitter into the mainstream with the tech crowd, and we’ll need something equally disruptive before Paris Hilton starts twittering.

    It’ll happen, just not sure when or how.

    @derek

  30. The biggest thing people have to realize with Twitter is that it isn’t a place to connect to people you already know, it’s a place to connect to new people. And that is so hard to inform people of, because they have no one to tell them.

    Robert, sure you get a tweet / second, but how many of those people did you know personally prior to getting on Twitter? Because you are so involved in the tech world, take your number, and divide it by 1000, cause that’s everyone else’s number. Most people know 0-2 people who are on Twitter prior to signing up. I knew 0 people when I signed up, and it took me 18 months before I actually started using it on a daily basis. There is an extremely steep learning curve with Twitter, not because it is complicated, but because it is simple, almost too simple. People don’t inherently “get” it.

    I don’t know what will push Twitter into the mainstream, but like Ramsey said, something will have to shift in the way people perceive social networks before that happens. The first thing people do on Myspace/facebook is add their friends. 99.99999999% of people can’t add more than 1 or 2 people on Twitter, and that’s the biggest drawback with the service right now. The vast majority of voices on Twitter are those the tech world early adoptees. My gf signed up for twitter at my urging, but she’s still kinda lost with what to do, and there’s really no one of interest for her to follow aside from getting local weather updates or CNN’s breaking news feed.

    The change will occur when something radically different occurs than what we have now. Desktop apps (Twitterific / Twhirl) threw Twitter into the mainstream with the tech crowd, and we’ll need something equally disruptive before Paris Hilton starts twittering.

    It’ll happen, just not sure when or how.

    @derek

  31. Twitter may or may not be going mainstream, but it is getting polluted.

    I personally created four separate accounts: all of which you follow by the way.

    Two of them have never been posted to, one is sent a random line of text every five minutes using the Twitter API, and one I update with a fictitious daily status.

    All of these twitter accounts get one or two new followers a day, people I don’t know, who are following over a thousand other people, in some cases over ten thousand people.

    This level of noise may kill Twitter before it gets widely adopted.

  32. Twitter may or may not be going mainstream, but it is getting polluted.

    I personally created four separate accounts: all of which you follow by the way.

    Two of them have never been posted to, one is sent a random line of text every five minutes using the Twitter API, and one I update with a fictitious daily status.

    All of these twitter accounts get one or two new followers a day, people I don’t know, who are following over a thousand other people, in some cases over ten thousand people.

    This level of noise may kill Twitter before it gets widely adopted.

  33. What’s with all this “early adopter” talk. It’s people of the “early adopter” demographic that are using Twitter — not because Twitter is new. That’s part of the problem, converting people who aren’t within that demographic type which is a part of making Twitter a mainstream product.

    Twitter launched in July of 2006. It’s far from new.


    @ramseym

  34. What’s with all this “early adopter” talk. It’s people of the “early adopter” demographic that are using Twitter — not because Twitter is new. That’s part of the problem, converting people who aren’t within that demographic type which is a part of making Twitter a mainstream product.

    Twitter launched in July of 2006. It’s far from new.


    @ramseym

  35. Kara didn’t ask her friends; she essentially asked 100 random people at a wedding in Washington, DC. Washington is focused on politics, and not the coolest new technology.

    I expect that you’d get the same response pretty much anywhere if you asked the same question.

  36. Kara didn’t ask her friends; she essentially asked 100 random people at a wedding in Washington, DC. Washington is focused on politics, and not the coolest new technology.

    I expect that you’d get the same response pretty much anywhere if you asked the same question.

  37. @18 passed a million users or passed a million tire-kickers? The better measure would how many of those “users” use it at least once a week? The more accrate statement is no one of any consequence is regularly ok twitter

  38. @18 passed a million users or passed a million tire-kickers? The better measure would how many of those “users” use it at least once a week? The more accrate statement is no one of any consequence is regularly ok twitter

  39. I still maintain that just because a niche wholly embraces it doesn’t mean it’s the future or the second coming. I fear for people who want to be that connected all of the time. Lots of attention whoring and narcissism if you ask me.

  40. I still maintain that just because a niche wholly embraces it doesn’t mean it’s the future or the second coming. I fear for people who want to be that connected all of the time. Lots of attention whoring and narcissism if you ask me.

  41. Sorry to here that Kara can’t find anyone at a wedding using Twitter and only the Echo chamber of Silicon Valley can even know about Twitter.

    I live in Calgary and I use Twitter.

    Maybe it is not so important to everyone else, maybe we are early adopters, or maybe it just doesn’t matter and we have found the 24×7 online party that everyone else doesn’t know about yet

  42. Sorry to here that Kara can’t find anyone at a wedding using Twitter and only the Echo chamber of Silicon Valley can even know about Twitter.

    I live in Calgary and I use Twitter.

    Maybe it is not so important to everyone else, maybe we are early adopters, or maybe it just doesn’t matter and we have found the 24×7 online party that everyone else doesn’t know about yet

  43. Robert. Leave the west coast. Nobody outside of the west coast is on twitter.

    It’s something that’s really popular in your world, but not in the rest of the world.

    You and your friends are a niche. All the names you drop, people you follow and link to, unheard of outside of the west coast.

    I’m not trying to be mean, just trying to put things in perspective.

  44. Robert. Leave the west coast. Nobody outside of the west coast is on twitter.

    It’s something that’s really popular in your world, but not in the rest of the world.

    You and your friends are a niche. All the names you drop, people you follow and link to, unheard of outside of the west coast.

    I’m not trying to be mean, just trying to put things in perspective.

  45. Also…

    When I was in Dallas last, my 16 year old cousin was having a party. There were about 20 16 year old girls and a few boys there, and I showed them Twitter.

    They didn’t get it. They thought it was pointless. They said “why do i need this?? I have myspace bulletins and text messaging and instant messaging. Why would i use this over those?”

    It didn’t even hold their interest longer than 10 seconds, even as they saw me using it.

  46. Also…

    When I was in Dallas last, my 16 year old cousin was having a party. There were about 20 16 year old girls and a few boys there, and I showed them Twitter.

    They didn’t get it. They thought it was pointless. They said “why do i need this?? I have myspace bulletins and text messaging and instant messaging. Why would i use this over those?”

    It didn’t even hold their interest longer than 10 seconds, even as they saw me using it.

  47. It is, in fact, somewhat true that almost no one outside Silicon Valley really knows a thing about Twitter, o cares. Even among the hardcore geek/engineer circles in which I move, Twitter is still a mystery. We had Tech Valley’s first Code Camp last week, and only one or two of the presenters were on Twitter, and neither of those is a heavy user. I think we got one or two more on board in the meantime, but still, if Twitter hasn’t penetrated to the geeks on the East Coast who are respected in more than just one metro market, then it really hasn’t penetrated, has it? Then again, same thing could be said about Facebook four years back.

    I think Twitter is the biggest current challenge to Facebook, both in geek and marketing circles — and that’s really saying something. Yes, they’ve faced technical challenges, but usage is growing rapidly, name recognition is greatly increasing (thanks in no small part to your efforts, Scoble — I don’t cast everything you do Twitter-wise in a negative light, but I certainly examine all aspects and facets in their own right) and third parties are building entire ecosystems around the API.

    Facebook is overgrown, Twitter is minimalist. Twitter can put niche experts in touch with their audience, or community, in ways simply not possible before. That said, Twitter is still in its infancy. I predict great things to come.

  48. It is, in fact, somewhat true that almost no one outside Silicon Valley really knows a thing about Twitter, o cares. Even among the hardcore geek/engineer circles in which I move, Twitter is still a mystery. We had Tech Valley’s first Code Camp last week, and only one or two of the presenters were on Twitter, and neither of those is a heavy user. I think we got one or two more on board in the meantime, but still, if Twitter hasn’t penetrated to the geeks on the East Coast who are respected in more than just one metro market, then it really hasn’t penetrated, has it? Then again, same thing could be said about Facebook four years back.

    I think Twitter is the biggest current challenge to Facebook, both in geek and marketing circles — and that’s really saying something. Yes, they’ve faced technical challenges, but usage is growing rapidly, name recognition is greatly increasing (thanks in no small part to your efforts, Scoble — I don’t cast everything you do Twitter-wise in a negative light, but I certainly examine all aspects and facets in their own right) and third parties are building entire ecosystems around the API.

    Facebook is overgrown, Twitter is minimalist. Twitter can put niche experts in touch with their audience, or community, in ways simply not possible before. That said, Twitter is still in its infancy. I predict great things to come.

  49. I’m sorry to seem like I’m just coming here to whine but Robert, I really wish you and a lot of the other “web2.0″ commentators would wake up.

    Very few people outside of the usual suspects have heard of things like twitter and very few of them care when they are shown it.

    What problem actually suffered by “real” people outside of the cutting edge of on-line IT folks like us do things like twitter actually solve?

  50. I’m sorry to seem like I’m just coming here to whine but Robert, I really wish you and a lot of the other “web2.0″ commentators would wake up.

    Very few people outside of the usual suspects have heard of things like twitter and very few of them care when they are shown it.

    What problem actually suffered by “real” people outside of the cutting edge of on-line IT folks like us do things like twitter actually solve?

  51. I hope your post was ironice from the start, including your question in line 1, asking why you get a twitter every second. I think we all know the answer why Mr. Scoble gets a Twitter every second. I don’t get one every second and I never will want to get one every second. I have never seen a bigger waster of productive time like Twitter before.
    I have a little suggestion for an interesting EXPERIMENT for you:

    STEP 1: Count the time you spent on skim reading the following tweets or starting to read tweets that you do not finish reading because:

    - they do not tell you anything you did not know already

    - they talk about things that do not interest you (“I am your follower number 5036 and i am going to my aunt’s birthday”)

    STEP 2:

    - count the time you spent on reading tweets that really interest you, where you learn something viable and valuable in a sustainable matter.

    Step 3:

    - compare the time you spent on reading step-2 tweets with the time you spent skim-reading or partially reading step 1 tweets. (even if it is just two word you read, there will be hundreds such post and you will spent a considerable time reading these airy posts) I BET YOU 10 $$$$$ b (maybe some other readers want to bet with me???????) that you spent more time on the latter.

    But now lets just look at the interesting step-2 tweets: do you honestly believe that it makes sense to spent all that time reading these tweets? think about what else you could do with that time, think about the scarcity of time: you could read blogs, books, scientific research, all treating the same subject matter that interests you and that those step-2 tweets relate to. There is so much more relevent content out there than those tweets. And the learning outcome of tweets is minimal, because the time you spent on them is so little. Sustainable learning comes in other ways. Or you could do productive work, answer all those unanswered mails, maybe spent more time on getting more and better interview partners for fastcompanytv.

    Twitter is for attention seekers, people who prefer going to conferences than sit behind their desk and work (I actually do prefer that as well), people who prefer holding a meeting than getting things done. It is the ultimate waster of time and does not play a role outside the tech bubble, where people do not have to spent so much time working, because their VCs see them as part of the product as well. And what better way to self-market yourself than building yourself a neat following base. Twitter will never make it mainstream and attention addicts will move on to other services. If Twitter will ever be a profitable company, please do send me a tweet though.

  52. I hope your post was ironice from the start, including your question in line 1, asking why you get a twitter every second. I think we all know the answer why Mr. Scoble gets a Twitter every second. I don’t get one every second and I never will want to get one every second. I have never seen a bigger waster of productive time like Twitter before.
    I have a little suggestion for an interesting EXPERIMENT for you:

    STEP 1: Count the time you spent on skim reading the following tweets or starting to read tweets that you do not finish reading because:

    - they do not tell you anything you did not know already

    - they talk about things that do not interest you (“I am your follower number 5036 and i am going to my aunt’s birthday”)

    STEP 2:

    - count the time you spent on reading tweets that really interest you, where you learn something viable and valuable in a sustainable matter.

    Step 3:

    - compare the time you spent on reading step-2 tweets with the time you spent skim-reading or partially reading step 1 tweets. (even if it is just two word you read, there will be hundreds such post and you will spent a considerable time reading these airy posts) I BET YOU 10 $$$$$ b (maybe some other readers want to bet with me???????) that you spent more time on the latter.

    But now lets just look at the interesting step-2 tweets: do you honestly believe that it makes sense to spent all that time reading these tweets? think about what else you could do with that time, think about the scarcity of time: you could read blogs, books, scientific research, all treating the same subject matter that interests you and that those step-2 tweets relate to. There is so much more relevent content out there than those tweets. And the learning outcome of tweets is minimal, because the time you spent on them is so little. Sustainable learning comes in other ways. Or you could do productive work, answer all those unanswered mails, maybe spent more time on getting more and better interview partners for fastcompanytv.

    Twitter is for attention seekers, people who prefer going to conferences than sit behind their desk and work (I actually do prefer that as well), people who prefer holding a meeting than getting things done. It is the ultimate waster of time and does not play a role outside the tech bubble, where people do not have to spent so much time working, because their VCs see them as part of the product as well. And what better way to self-market yourself than building yourself a neat following base. Twitter will never make it mainstream and attention addicts will move on to other services. If Twitter will ever be a profitable company, please do send me a tweet though.

  53. Twitter is for attention seekers

    Yup. Broadcast mode to your cult followers, and the conference crowd party-modes. But give it time, their attention will wane, and either Twitter will do something to collectively tick them off, on their road to making money, or some bright sparkle-shiny new toy, will grab all the new attention.

    A nifty feature perhaps, but hardly something to wrap an entire company around.

  54. Twitter is for attention seekers

    Yup. Broadcast mode to your cult followers, and the conference crowd party-modes. But give it time, their attention will wane, and either Twitter will do something to collectively tick them off, on their road to making money, or some bright sparkle-shiny new toy, will grab all the new attention.

    A nifty feature perhaps, but hardly something to wrap an entire company around.

  55. @larryborsato – actually, DC has a pretty large tech/web 2.0/start-up community. I agree that random wedding guests may not be the best option (DC being a transient town, and guest maybe from out of town) – but as a whole there is a big community of users in DC. Even if you look at the political community, many politicians are turning to Web 2.0 technologies to reach constituents.

    @lyf108

  56. @larryborsato – actually, DC has a pretty large tech/web 2.0/start-up community. I agree that random wedding guests may not be the best option (DC being a transient town, and guest maybe from out of town) – but as a whole there is a big community of users in DC. Even if you look at the political community, many politicians are turning to Web 2.0 technologies to reach constituents.

    @lyf108

  57. Signed up at Twitter a few months ago out of curiosity, but after spending some time there, I simply can’t figure out what to do with it or what problem is solves for me. Nobody I know uses it. Haven’t gone back to the site since.

    Same story with Facebook. I signed up a year ago, but probably logged in twice in my life. I can’t figure out why people use it, but they apparently do.

  58. Signed up at Twitter a few months ago out of curiosity, but after spending some time there, I simply can’t figure out what to do with it or what problem is solves for me. Nobody I know uses it. Haven’t gone back to the site since.

    Same story with Facebook. I signed up a year ago, but probably logged in twice in my life. I can’t figure out why people use it, but they apparently do.

  59. I live in the Midwest (Ohio). The first time I heard of Twitter it sounded dumb. I signed up, though.

    Since then:
    -I recruited my entire office to sign up and use Twitter on a daily basis
    -My workmates post updates about our clients’ successes and updates about our software on Twitter (shameless promotion: http://twitter.com/donordrive)
    -I got my MOM to sign up and use Twitter on a semi-regular basis
    -I’ve met new people from my area
    -I’ve attended more local events and got other people to attend

    You’re saying Twitter isn’t useful? It’s sure working out for me.

  60. I live in the Midwest (Ohio). The first time I heard of Twitter it sounded dumb. I signed up, though.

    Since then:
    -I recruited my entire office to sign up and use Twitter on a daily basis
    -My workmates post updates about our clients’ successes and updates about our software on Twitter (shameless promotion: http://twitter.com/donordrive)
    -I got my MOM to sign up and use Twitter on a semi-regular basis
    -I’ve met new people from my area
    -I’ve attended more local events and got other people to attend

    You’re saying Twitter isn’t useful? It’s sure working out for me.

  61. Twitter is no more or less of a time waster than e-mail, IM, blogging, reading, ‘riting, ‘rithmetic.

    Once you start to get a following, like on any ‘social network’ then you can do awfully useful things like quickly poll the crowd on simple things like “is website x.com down for anyone else? (typepad for example)” to feedback on new web designs, what cell phone to buy out of a handful of choices, etc..

    The virtual watercooler effect is pretty handy, and doesn’t require firing up a “room” in any sort of IM/IRQ/ICQ-style parlance. You step in and out of the flow as you like.

    But Twitter certainly does bad things for you if you lean at all towards ADD! :)

  62. Twitter is no more or less of a time waster than e-mail, IM, blogging, reading, ‘riting, ‘rithmetic.

    Once you start to get a following, like on any ‘social network’ then you can do awfully useful things like quickly poll the crowd on simple things like “is website x.com down for anyone else? (typepad for example)” to feedback on new web designs, what cell phone to buy out of a handful of choices, etc..

    The virtual watercooler effect is pretty handy, and doesn’t require firing up a “room” in any sort of IM/IRQ/ICQ-style parlance. You step in and out of the flow as you like.

    But Twitter certainly does bad things for you if you lean at all towards ADD! :)

  63. Incidentally, I thought I was one of the only strange ones in Boston to be using Twitter, until I went to a Knowledge Management session at Bentley College a few weeks ago, and 30-50% of the KM people (most of them older than me, and I’m an Apple ][+ kinda guy) had heard of and were using Twitter.

    I was flabbergasted to be honest. As a result of twittering, found out one fellow works not 2 blocks from me. This isn’t just a Silly-Con Valley phenomenon. ;)

  64. Incidentally, I thought I was one of the only strange ones in Boston to be using Twitter, until I went to a Knowledge Management session at Bentley College a few weeks ago, and 30-50% of the KM people (most of them older than me, and I’m an Apple ][+ kinda guy) had heard of and were using Twitter.

    I was flabbergasted to be honest. As a result of twittering, found out one fellow works not 2 blocks from me. This isn’t just a Silly-Con Valley phenomenon. ;)