Brian Solis' and Loic Le Meur's real "PR" secrets

Brian Solis just wrote a guest post for TechCrunch in which he gave away many of the secrets of the PR industry. Every entrepreneur and even every product manager inside a big company should read it and understand the tactics discussed there. Don’t miss the additional video by Seesmic’s CEO/founder, Loic Le Meur in that same post’s comments. Loic is the best at this in the business.

While I was writing this post Loic Le Meur wrote a new blog post calling “bulls++t” on Brian’s post. You should read that as well and that started an interesting discussion on FriendFeed.

But Brian didn’t give away his real secret sauce: how does he get bloggers and journalists to write about the stuff he’s representing? I’ve known Brian for quite a while and here’s some of his secrets that I didn’t see him disclose on TechCrunch:

1. PR now stands for “Professional Relationships.” How can I tell a good PR person (like Brian) vs. a bad one (who sends me emails about stuff I’d never write about)? Easy: Brian builds relationships with me and every other blogger. He takes our pictures. He always welcomes us by name and with a smile (and often a hug, if he knows you well). He doesn’t just do this for the A-listers, either. I’ve watched him at parties and he always introduces me to someone I’ve never heard of before.

2. The new PR is about creating visually-rich experiences. Why? Because more and more bloggers and journalists are being forced to use cameras and video. Look at Kara Swisher. She carries her video camera everywhere. When I met the publisher of the Washington Post he said more and more of his journalists are carrying video cameras. So, no longer is it appropriate to show off a PowerPoint presentation. A simple demo works far better and the best PR people come ready with a USB key full of screen captures and stuff.

3. You don’t need PR at all if you have a great product. Remember how I found out about Qik.com? I was hanging out with Dave Winer and my son in an Apple store. A friend of the company (a beta tester) recognized me and said “you’re going to want to see this.” I was amazed and wrote a blog post WHILE IN THE STORE. Then my next item was to beg to get added to the beta, which they did and now I’ve done more than 700 videos with my cell phone and gotten more than 450,000 visits. I later learned that they weren’t ready for all this PR (they didn’t even have an official PR firm back then) but stayed up for two nights straight to get ready for all the people who were asking for access. I credit Michael Forston, lead developer for building a great community in those early days. Note how he’s on Twitter and keeping in touch with everyone even today.

4. You gotta go meet bloggers, journalists, and influentials. Often. Early. They won’t come to you, you’ve gotta go to them. Watch Upcoming.org’s tech event calendar and see where they’ll be (at least that’s where the tech bloggers/influentials/journalists will be) and go there and make sure you meet them and make a good impression. Lines that work on me? “I got something that might make you cry” or “if you think FriendFeed is cool, wait until you see this.” Using lines like these demonstrate you know a little bit about my blog and are looking to only bring me really impressive stuff. Be ready for me to turn on my Qik camera, though. I want to capture that first demo if it really is great. I remember when Stewart Butterfield, founder of the company that made Flickr, first showed it to me in the hallway at Tim O’Reilly’s Emerging Technology conference. Magical demo that still makes an impact on me when I think back on it and that was, what, five years ago now?

5. If you have a magical experience, invite influentials to share in. Laurent Haig invites me every year to his friend’s chalet in the Swiss mountains. A couple of years ago that led to a demo while sitting around drinking wine (he didn’t ask PR permission, which got him in a bit of trouble as they got nearly 100,000 requests in the next 24 hours, thanks to tons of blogging, including a post on TechCrunch. No PR people were involved, just an entrepreneur who understood the value of creating a fun experience for people who could tell other people about his product and company. Heck, he told me later he didn’t even have plans to show us CoComment and that it was a reward for speaking at his conference. That’ll teach Laurent a lesson about having some wine while hanging out with bloggers for a weekend. That said, Laurent is a guy I’d do anything for and this fall I’m going to Korea to help him with his conference there.

6. Create touch-points for influentials. Brian and other companies and PR professionals in the industry (including me and others at Fast Company) create events that attract bloggers and journalists and other influentials. We are creating another “social media event” at next year’s Consumer Electronics Show to do exactly that. How do you get bloggers to show up? Have famous bloggers like Kevin Rose, Leo Laporte, Ryan Block, Tim Ferriss, Scott Beale, etc show up. Give them a fun event, like a wine party, make sure there’s lots of bandwidth, wifi, etc., there. And now watch what happens. I bet someone will write about, photo, or video, your event like Scott Beale did.

7. But really, this only matters if you have a great product that people want to tell other people about. If Ansel Adams wasn’t the best landscape photographer that ever lived, would it have mattered that we got an invite to Yosemite? No. Gotta have the goods which will tell the story on their own.

How do you get people to cover your company’s products?

Added bonus: BusinessWeek just wrote about what has been happening in online content beyond blogs.

Comments

  1. Robert, you’re spot on.

    I’ve done this about 4 times today, but I think the PR industry and entrepreneurs need to learn from their more expensive cousins, Lobbyists.

    Good Lobbyists know how to build grassroots support for a cause (community) and motivate “grass-tops” (bloggers) to join them. They are also experts at maintaining personal relationships. No three tools are as valuable as a contact list, an expense account, and OpenTable.

    They also don’t lie. I know that’s the reputation the industry has, but the truth is (I’ll say it again here) that once you’ve given a Member, staffer, or journalist bad information, you’re done. Your job, whether a PR person, entrepreneur or Lobbyist is to build real relationships with and gain the trust of stakeholders (the community and leaders, aka grassroots/grasstops or userbase/early adopters/bloggers, or staff/members) and become an expert on your product, be it a website or piece of legislation. Once you do that, people will make decisions based on your information. If you, even once, mislead, omit, “forget” or lie, that door is forever closed.

  2. Robert, you’re spot on.

    I’ve done this about 4 times today, but I think the PR industry and entrepreneurs need to learn from their more expensive cousins, Lobbyists.

    Good Lobbyists know how to build grassroots support for a cause (community) and motivate “grass-tops” (bloggers) to join them. They are also experts at maintaining personal relationships. No three tools are as valuable as a contact list, an expense account, and OpenTable.

    They also don’t lie. I know that’s the reputation the industry has, but the truth is (I’ll say it again here) that once you’ve given a Member, staffer, or journalist bad information, you’re done. Your job, whether a PR person, entrepreneur or Lobbyist is to build real relationships with and gain the trust of stakeholders (the community and leaders, aka grassroots/grasstops or userbase/early adopters/bloggers, or staff/members) and become an expert on your product, be it a website or piece of legislation. Once you do that, people will make decisions based on your information. If you, even once, mislead, omit, “forget” or lie, that door is forever closed.

  3. I agree. Good post. Especially, “you don’t need PR at all if you have a great product. “. At the end of the day, a great product will mitigate the need for traditional PR and marketing. A good PR professional has their finger on the pulse of change.

  4. I agree. Good post. Especially, “you don’t need PR at all if you have a great product. “. At the end of the day, a great product will mitigate the need for traditional PR and marketing. A good PR professional has their finger on the pulse of change.

  5. I’m not one for leaving “Great post” comments . . .

    But . . .

    Great post!! Very insightful.

  6. I’m not one for leaving “Great post” comments . . .

    But . . .

    Great post!! Very insightful.

  7. One thing i disagree with is “you don’t need PR at all if you have a great product. “. The number of products i have come across who don’t receive enough traction simply because they dont know how to get the message out is ridiculous. Good Product does not equal PR success, it requires work, it requires help and it requires a real push to make sure the right people are hearing about your great product.

    http://www.friendfeed.com/zee

  8. One thing i disagree with is “you don’t need PR at all if you have a great product. “. The number of products i have come across who don’t receive enough traction simply because they dont know how to get the message out is ridiculous. Good Product does not equal PR success, it requires work, it requires help and it requires a real push to make sure the right people are hearing about your great product.

    http://www.friendfeed.com/zee

  9. Great insights, and I would (natch) like to add one more – the prequel. I am finding more and more than to really grok the social web one has to be a native speaker. Lots of PR and ad agencies are developing campaigns basically on the sideline, having read the Cliff Notes (aka watched a few YT videos/read a few blogs). This is a classic “learn by doing” profession now.

    So all of these tips will actually make sense and be usable IF the PR person actually starts blogging/twittering/podcasting etc.

    Do you know anyone who truly gets it and does not use at least one of the social web tools decently? It must be possible, but not too probable.

  10. Great insights, and I would (natch) like to add one more – the prequel. I am finding more and more than to really grok the social web one has to be a native speaker. Lots of PR and ad agencies are developing campaigns basically on the sideline, having read the Cliff Notes (aka watched a few YT videos/read a few blogs). This is a classic “learn by doing” profession now.

    So all of these tips will actually make sense and be usable IF the PR person actually starts blogging/twittering/podcasting etc.

    Do you know anyone who truly gets it and does not use at least one of the social web tools decently? It must be possible, but not too probable.

  11. A few points…

    (1) Funny, but throughout the article it was “bloggers and reporters” time and time again. Huh? No doubt where this was headed. Well, that is, until supposed “Secret #5″ (don’t release on Mondays). Now all of sudden it’s “journalists and bloggers”.

    Go figure.

    (2) Robert – “Brian Solis just wrote a guest post for TechCrunch in which he gave away many of the secrets of the PR industry. Every entrepreneur and even every product manager inside a big company should read it and understand the tactics discussed there. Don’t miss the additional video by Seesmic’s CEO/founder, Loic Le Meur in that same post’s comments. Loic is the best at this in the business.”

    There is SO much wrong with this. But well, at least you are open to what you are – a PR guy who actually believes he is saying something important and unique.

    First, Solos did not “give away” a single secret. He spoke simple common sense while pushing his agenda of “blogs matter big time, provided you do it with an agenda that I can help you with”.

    Second, no entrepreneur – and particularly NO product manager inside a “big” company needs to read this drivel. Nothing new here… move along. Same old same old. And yeah – and person who has moved up to product manager in a “big” company is shaking their head and laughing. This is *pure* PR serving PR crap.

    Kind of like your PR bullshit in 2003 when you said I’d lose my job to somebody in India if I didn’t attend the PDC. PR hype always dissipates like any smelly cruft when there’s anything close to a breeze.

    But finally? You have the nerve to (yet again) claim a (must view) video from someone I could care less about.

    Drivel.

    (3) PR now stands for “Professional Relationships.”

    Not for 90% of the working professionals out there. Sure, maybe for 90% of those PUBLIC RELATIONS people who have to somehow come up with yet another “new and improved” way to make a living – like you. But to the rest of us working grunts and entrepreneurs and middle/upper level managers at “big” companies? Um, no.

    (4) The new PR is about creating visually-rich experiences.

    I see. Would that be PR == professional relationships, or PR == public relations?

    Question Robert – just taking a stab in the dark here – but did you know that this newfangled thing called “television” is over 50 years old?

    My point is this. A few weeks ago you post about how 90% of the public doesn’t know what RSS is and have no clue of these things called Twitter, FaceBook, and even MySpace. Yet right now you over-hype (yet again) something self-serving TO YOU, totally ignorant of what is reality.

    Just because you have this need to, um, “PR” the fact that you’ve gone “visually-rich” doesn’t mean you’re anything even close to the mainstream. Nor does it mean you aren’t so close to this subject to avoid hype!

    But I’m glad you aren’t breaking into tears like you did in March. And again, I’m glad you aren’t arguing with me the I’ll lose my job to somebody in India if I don’t become “visually-rich”.

    (5) You don’t need PR at all if you have a great product.

    Truth. Spot on. Gospel.

    Which is why I don’t understand what value you see in the post by Solis – which is simply yet another rehash of decades old thoughts.

    (6) You gotta go meet bloggers, journalists, and influentials. Often. Early. They won’t come to you, you’ve gotta go to them.

    Yes. And yet, no. There’s a time to proactively meet and greet. But please, have a product first! Not an idea, not something on paper. Don’t meet them with demos or prototypes. Meet them with something beyond beta.

    (7) But really, this only matters if you have a great product that people want to tell other people about.

    I see you agree!

  12. A few points…

    (1) Funny, but throughout the article it was “bloggers and reporters” time and time again. Huh? No doubt where this was headed. Well, that is, until supposed “Secret #5″ (don’t release on Mondays). Now all of sudden it’s “journalists and bloggers”.

    Go figure.

    (2) Robert – “Brian Solis just wrote a guest post for TechCrunch in which he gave away many of the secrets of the PR industry. Every entrepreneur and even every product manager inside a big company should read it and understand the tactics discussed there. Don’t miss the additional video by Seesmic’s CEO/founder, Loic Le Meur in that same post’s comments. Loic is the best at this in the business.”

    There is SO much wrong with this. But well, at least you are open to what you are – a PR guy who actually believes he is saying something important and unique.

    First, Solos did not “give away” a single secret. He spoke simple common sense while pushing his agenda of “blogs matter big time, provided you do it with an agenda that I can help you with”.

    Second, no entrepreneur – and particularly NO product manager inside a “big” company needs to read this drivel. Nothing new here… move along. Same old same old. And yeah – and person who has moved up to product manager in a “big” company is shaking their head and laughing. This is *pure* PR serving PR crap.

    Kind of like your PR bullshit in 2003 when you said I’d lose my job to somebody in India if I didn’t attend the PDC. PR hype always dissipates like any smelly cruft when there’s anything close to a breeze.

    But finally? You have the nerve to (yet again) claim a (must view) video from someone I could care less about.

    Drivel.

    (3) PR now stands for “Professional Relationships.”

    Not for 90% of the working professionals out there. Sure, maybe for 90% of those PUBLIC RELATIONS people who have to somehow come up with yet another “new and improved” way to make a living – like you. But to the rest of us working grunts and entrepreneurs and middle/upper level managers at “big” companies? Um, no.

    (4) The new PR is about creating visually-rich experiences.

    I see. Would that be PR == professional relationships, or PR == public relations?

    Question Robert – just taking a stab in the dark here – but did you know that this newfangled thing called “television” is over 50 years old?

    My point is this. A few weeks ago you post about how 90% of the public doesn’t know what RSS is and have no clue of these things called Twitter, FaceBook, and even MySpace. Yet right now you over-hype (yet again) something self-serving TO YOU, totally ignorant of what is reality.

    Just because you have this need to, um, “PR” the fact that you’ve gone “visually-rich” doesn’t mean you’re anything even close to the mainstream. Nor does it mean you aren’t so close to this subject to avoid hype!

    But I’m glad you aren’t breaking into tears like you did in March. And again, I’m glad you aren’t arguing with me the I’ll lose my job to somebody in India if I don’t become “visually-rich”.

    (5) You don’t need PR at all if you have a great product.

    Truth. Spot on. Gospel.

    Which is why I don’t understand what value you see in the post by Solis – which is simply yet another rehash of decades old thoughts.

    (6) You gotta go meet bloggers, journalists, and influentials. Often. Early. They won’t come to you, you’ve gotta go to them.

    Yes. And yet, no. There’s a time to proactively meet and greet. But please, have a product first! Not an idea, not something on paper. Don’t meet them with demos or prototypes. Meet them with something beyond beta.

    (7) But really, this only matters if you have a great product that people want to tell other people about.

    I see you agree!

  13. I love the ‘first you gotta build a great product’ thrown about like OH, okay, brb. Okay, done. Here’s the great product.

    Now to professionally stalk people, er, ‘build relationships’…

    Because we call it ‘build relationships’ this is somehow different? Come on, if you want to build a relationship with me, help me move/hide the bodies. Maybe babysit for me.

    I know full fucking well the only reason people build relationships with any of us is because of our past, present, and future.

    Of COURSE someone is going to build a relationship with someone with 20,000 points of data, duh! Well of course, after step 1. “Build great product”

    We are just the newer generation of a very old thing. Second verse same as the first.

  14. I love the ‘first you gotta build a great product’ thrown about like OH, okay, brb. Okay, done. Here’s the great product.

    Now to professionally stalk people, er, ‘build relationships’…

    Because we call it ‘build relationships’ this is somehow different? Come on, if you want to build a relationship with me, help me move/hide the bodies. Maybe babysit for me.

    I know full fucking well the only reason people build relationships with any of us is because of our past, present, and future.

    Of COURSE someone is going to build a relationship with someone with 20,000 points of data, duh! Well of course, after step 1. “Build great product”

    We are just the newer generation of a very old thing. Second verse same as the first.

  15. I am not sure there was anything new in there. As a product manager, the best PR was getting my customers to talk about my products, and for one simple reason (well two); they liked the product and they valued their relationship with the company as it would help them be successful at their day job. if you can’t achieve that, you can hire the best PR people and it won’t be worth much

  16. I am not sure there was anything new in there. As a product manager, the best PR was getting my customers to talk about my products, and for one simple reason (well two); they liked the product and they valued their relationship with the company as it would help them be successful at their day job. if you can’t achieve that, you can hire the best PR people and it won’t be worth much

  17. I think visually-rich is a correct analogy, but it’s not just video. Effective press releases these days include much more than links. PR pros should be including high-res product photos for budget/time-weary print journalists to use, RSS feeds from the brand and multiple ways of contacting the PR pro.
    Some of the comments above have a point, there’s nothing revolutionary here, but the underlying message is change. PR is changing and so is media. The sooner we step up and play the better the industries will be for it.

  18. I think visually-rich is a correct analogy, but it’s not just video. Effective press releases these days include much more than links. PR pros should be including high-res product photos for budget/time-weary print journalists to use, RSS feeds from the brand and multiple ways of contacting the PR pro.
    Some of the comments above have a point, there’s nothing revolutionary here, but the underlying message is change. PR is changing and so is media. The sooner we step up and play the better the industries will be for it.

  19. This is all so much trendy-in-crowd circular…feed the big crybabies and goto their fun parties, ignoring everyone else, a marketing tactic actually perfected (rather made into an art form) by Microsoft marketing teams, stoke the “influentials”, holding parties, junkets and freebie entitlements, never having to leave your desktop (or non-stop fun) behind. Would be great if the geek and web creatures had real scale, but they don’t and won’t ever, the internet is just a ‘look busy’ cop-out.

    Current customers are your best advertisers, and “customers” extends far beyond the edge-case tiddly-wink termites that chew on the internet. PR should really be CRM, but instead it’s all about the quick hits, the big highs, but like too many Red Bulls, a crash-down comes hither, so any real long-term impact is best framed in terms of an overall multi-tier strategic plan: Advertisements, Placements, Field and Event Marketing, Cross-Marketing, Sales, Give-Aways/Contests, Sponsorships, etc. etc.

    Visually-rich experiences? Maybe for cell phone cam bloggers and TV journalists that can’t write, but CEOs and customers need hard-data, ROI and test-cases, not video gee-whiz demos. Plus, duh, not like TV hasn’t been around for ages.

    Relationships? Only to the top-tier data hogs, and the relationship stops (or slows down) when you stop helping, and become a hindrance, which is usually about 3-5 weeks, the amount of fill your attention span can hold. A relationship that only demands, and never gives, is not a relationship.

    Would counterpoint this fluff serious, but I see others beat me to it, so fill-in-the-blanks with what Dave said. Plus, it’s all so much rot, everything works, and yet nothing works, Apple is seriously downright rude and mean, and yet they induce cult-like behavior, Microsoft is quite warm, yet everything consumerish, goes cold (or requires a bail-out).

  20. This is all so much trendy-in-crowd circular…feed the big crybabies and goto their fun parties, ignoring everyone else, a marketing tactic actually perfected (rather made into an art form) by Microsoft marketing teams, stoke the “influentials”, holding parties, junkets and freebie entitlements, never having to leave your desktop (or non-stop fun) behind. Would be great if the geek and web creatures had real scale, but they don’t and won’t ever, the internet is just a ‘look busy’ cop-out.

    Current customers are your best advertisers, and “customers” extends far beyond the edge-case tiddly-wink termites that chew on the internet. PR should really be CRM, but instead it’s all about the quick hits, the big highs, but like too many Red Bulls, a crash-down comes hither, so any real long-term impact is best framed in terms of an overall multi-tier strategic plan: Advertisements, Placements, Field and Event Marketing, Cross-Marketing, Sales, Give-Aways/Contests, Sponsorships, etc. etc.

    Visually-rich experiences? Maybe for cell phone cam bloggers and TV journalists that can’t write, but CEOs and customers need hard-data, ROI and test-cases, not video gee-whiz demos. Plus, duh, not like TV hasn’t been around for ages.

    Relationships? Only to the top-tier data hogs, and the relationship stops (or slows down) when you stop helping, and become a hindrance, which is usually about 3-5 weeks, the amount of fill your attention span can hold. A relationship that only demands, and never gives, is not a relationship.

    Would counterpoint this fluff serious, but I see others beat me to it, so fill-in-the-blanks with what Dave said. Plus, it’s all so much rot, everything works, and yet nothing works, Apple is seriously downright rude and mean, and yet they induce cult-like behavior, Microsoft is quite warm, yet everything consumerish, goes cold (or requires a bail-out).

  21. PS – As they say, new wine, into old wineskins (just all Web 2.0 buzzworded up). Or to go all haywire Battlestarish, all such has happened before, and will happen again.

  22. PS – As they say, new wine, into old wineskins (just all Web 2.0 buzzworded up). Or to go all haywire Battlestarish, all such has happened before, and will happen again.

  23. Christopher: go back on your meds, please.

    You really gotta work on that counter-argument thing there.

    Plus, one of these days, I will agree with you, statistically it’s bound to happen.

  24. Christopher: go back on your meds, please.

    You really gotta work on that counter-argument thing there.

    Plus, one of these days, I will agree with you, statistically it’s bound to happen.

  25. Planning PR now for a new start up of ours and agree with just about everyone’s points (because I’m a born accommodator and because there are no secrets or magic solutons, only tips from people with different experiences when it comes to this stuff – as Brian pointed out on the friend feed).

    One thing about Loic. Community is essential but his community was built partially due to his personal status in 2.0 land. A start up like ours has a good quality network but will need PR to generate a community of meaningful size so that we can then take Loic’s lead and listen to them.

    Ps – judging by your definition of experiences Robert, I’m glad my co-founder has a fantastic cellar!

  26. Planning PR now for a new start up of ours and agree with just about everyone’s points (because I’m a born accommodator and because there are no secrets or magic solutons, only tips from people with different experiences when it comes to this stuff – as Brian pointed out on the friend feed).

    One thing about Loic. Community is essential but his community was built partially due to his personal status in 2.0 land. A start up like ours has a good quality network but will need PR to generate a community of meaningful size so that we can then take Loic’s lead and listen to them.

    Ps – judging by your definition of experiences Robert, I’m glad my co-founder has a fantastic cellar!

  27. PR Doesn’t make a product good. If the product is solid, it will become popular on its own. It’s as simple as that. People definitely overstate the strength of PR.

  28. PR Doesn’t make a product good. If the product is solid, it will become popular on its own. It’s as simple as that. People definitely overstate the strength of PR.

  29. Robert – great post, but I don’t agree with the “You don’t need PR at all if you have a great product” bit. The Qik.com guys may have been plain lucky to bump into you – what about others who are sitting on a great product and waiting to be heard ?

  30. Robert – great post, but I don’t agree with the “You don’t need PR at all if you have a great product” bit. The Qik.com guys may have been plain lucky to bump into you – what about others who are sitting on a great product and waiting to be heard ?

  31. energy follows intention

    if you get that, and are clear about your motivation, then you have done the hard part, because all communication is infused with motive, and we run away from the greedy and selfish ones

  32. energy follows intention

    if you get that, and are clear about your motivation, then you have done the hard part, because all communication is infused with motive, and we run away from the greedy and selfish ones

  33. I’m not losing hope, one day you’ll get my weird-but-that’s-what-you-get-when-your-father-comes-from-Alsace lastname Robert: Haug ;)
    Stop making me pay for the Swiss press calling you Robert Sciable back in 2006 ;)

  34. I’m not losing hope, one day you’ll get my weird-but-that’s-what-you-get-when-your-father-comes-from-Alsace lastname Robert: Haug ;)
    Stop making me pay for the Swiss press calling you Robert Sciable back in 2006 ;)

  35. Who is going to read and pick up your PR when you are nobody?
    As a start-up you are nobody.

    So you can write many PR’s and hoping for one to catch on.
    Or you can try to leverage on somebody else’s “fame”:
    - becoming good friends with a journalist or blogger
    - partnership: where the PR mentions the other company
    - participating in a contest – award: the PR of the organizing party carries your company or solution

    Or write a controversial PR – where you get a lot of comments on in blogs.

  36. Who is going to read and pick up your PR when you are nobody?
    As a start-up you are nobody.

    So you can write many PR’s and hoping for one to catch on.
    Or you can try to leverage on somebody else’s “fame”:
    - becoming good friends with a journalist or blogger
    - partnership: where the PR mentions the other company
    - participating in a contest – award: the PR of the organizing party carries your company or solution

    Or write a controversial PR – where you get a lot of comments on in blogs.

  37. [...] whether there is even a need for PR with all the social media tools widely available. Everyone from Robert Scoble to Stowe Boyd were chiming in with their thoughts, generating hundreds of comments in the [...]

  38. I still believe u need PR even if you are a great product. WIth millions of good sites and google not returning any thing with less PR u need proper PR-ing to get into limelight.

    After that I believe its all about quality

  39. I still believe u need PR even if you are a great product. WIth millions of good sites and google not returning any thing with less PR u need proper PR-ing to get into limelight.

    After that I believe its all about quality

  40. PR, Public Relations, or Professional Relationships, whatever you choose to call it we’re social primates who require relatedness to others.

    “One monkey equals No monkey”

    I propose we use the term “Primate Relationships” as being more accurate, both emotionally and professionally.

    Dennis Foreman

  41. PR, Public Relations, or Professional Relationships, whatever you choose to call it we’re social primates who require relatedness to others.

    “One monkey equals No monkey”

    I propose we use the term “Primate Relationships” as being more accurate, both emotionally and professionally.

    Dennis Foreman

  42. Great insights, and I would (natch) like to add one more – the prequel. I am finding more and more than to really grok the social web one has to be a native speaker. Lots of PR and ad agencies are developing campaigns basically on the sideline, having read the Cliff Notes (aka watched a few YT videos/read a few blogs). This is a classic “learn by doing” profession now.

    So all of these tips will actually make sense and be usable IF the PR person actually starts blogging/twittering/podcasting etc.

    Do you know anyone who truly gets it and does not use at least one of the social web tools decently? It must be possible, but not too probable.

  43. Great insights, and I would (natch) like to add one more – the prequel. I am finding more and more than to really grok the social web one has to be a native speaker. Lots of PR and ad agencies are developing campaigns basically on the sideline, having read the Cliff Notes (aka watched a few YT videos/read a few blogs). This is a classic “learn by doing” profession now.

    So all of these tips will actually make sense and be usable IF the PR person actually starts blogging/twittering/podcasting etc.

    Do you know anyone who truly gets it and does not use at least one of the social web tools decently? It must be possible, but not too probable.

  44. Its less about PR than about the product it seems. However, some businesses seem to make products of low quality seem better than ones of better quality.


    I am a medical student who has ambitions to visit the Eiffel Tower and Great Wall of China!

  45. PR, Public Relations, or Professional Relationships, whatever you choose to call it we're social primates who require relatedness to others.

  46. PR, Public Relations, or Professional Relationships, whatever you choose to call it we're social primates who require relatedness to others.