Chris Messina nails it

I’ve been trying to find the words to explain why I love the public web. It’s messy, yes. Upcoming.org isn’t quite as nice as Facebook’s event system. Flickr isn’t quite as nice as Facebook’s photo sharing service. FriendFeed isn’t quite as nice as Facebook’s news feed. Google’s AdWords aren’t quite as nice as Facebook’s advertising. YouTube and Seesmic and Qik put together aren’t quite as nice as Facebook’s video area.

Yet something about Facebook just doesn’t pull me in. It’s too clean. Too controlled. Not messy enough. And I feel like everytime I go in there I have to switch my mindset. Why do I do that? So I don’t get kicked off, for one. I continue getting emails from people who are getting kicked off just for doing stuff on Facebook. Irina Slutsky, former employee of mine, told me last night that she got kicked off simply for sending too many messages to her friends.

Chris Messina, who is one of the smartest developers in the industry, puts those feelings into a post that finally nailed it for me. Thank you Chris. Facebook=centralized planning. Facebook=Soviet Russia. We all know how that turned out!

55 thoughts on “Chris Messina nails it

  1. I liked the Soviet train story. It reminded me of Microsoft and their implementations of… well, just about anything they make.

    Whether it’s web browsers or document file formats, Microsoft has always resisted acceptance and implementation of existing standards (whether formal or de-facto) in favor of their own proprietary implementation, in order to make competition more difficult and in hopes that their implementation will become the de-facto standard.

    This has worked well for them in the past when there weren’t very many other “railroads”, but now the rest of the world would like to standardize the “track gauges” for improved interoperability, and Microsoft is looking like the Soviets in the analogy. Will Microsoft adjust their “track gauges”, or are their “interoperability” efforts nothing more than attempts to get the rest of the world to adjust theirs?

  2. I liked the Soviet train story. It reminded me of Microsoft and their implementations of… well, just about anything they make.

    Whether it’s web browsers or document file formats, Microsoft has always resisted acceptance and implementation of existing standards (whether formal or de-facto) in favor of their own proprietary implementation, in order to make competition more difficult and in hopes that their implementation will become the de-facto standard.

    This has worked well for them in the past when there weren’t very many other “railroads”, but now the rest of the world would like to standardize the “track gauges” for improved interoperability, and Microsoft is looking like the Soviets in the analogy. Will Microsoft adjust their “track gauges”, or are their “interoperability” efforts nothing more than attempts to get the rest of the world to adjust theirs?

  3. I liked the Soviet train story. It reminded me of Microsoft and their implementations of… well, just about anything they make.

    Whether it’s web browsers or document file formats, Microsoft has always resisted acceptance and implementation of existing standards (whether formal or de-facto) in favor of their own proprietary implementation, in order to make competition more difficult and in hopes that their implementation will become the de-facto standard.

    This has worked well for them in the past when there weren’t very many other “railroads”, but now the rest of the world would like to standardize the “track gauges” for improved interoperability, and Microsoft is looking like the Soviets in the analogy. Will Microsoft adjust their “track gauges”, or are their “interoperability” efforts nothing more than attempts to get the rest of the world to adjust theirs?

  4. Do you recall how if you wanted Scoble-content last year one had to go to FB to get it? How do you reconcile this post with that?

  5. Do you recall how if you wanted Scoble-content last year one had to go to FB to get it? How do you reconcile this post with that?

Comments are closed.