Off of the tech entertainment train

Today several people noted that I am no longer on Techmeme’s leader board.

Funny, lately I’ve been reading TechMeme less and less and caring less and less about whether what I do appears there. It’s why I went to Washington DC. I knew the other geeks like Mike Arrington wouldn’t link to those videos. Why? Well, as Zoe Lofgren said in the conversation we had with her, politicians are boring. I remember on a Gillmor Gang a few months back that Arrington announced that he was an entertainer. He’s right, and is one of the reasons why he owns the top of the Techmeme leaderboard. Me? I’d rather do something else than be an entertainer. I want to have smart conversations and if that means I’m not going to be on the Techmeme leaderboard anymore, so be it.

This week I was at Hewlett Packard hanging out with researchers who are working at the atomic level to find new ways to make memory and processors that will be far more important to all of us than whether or not there’s some people standing in line waiting for the next iPhone. But science isn’t sexy. You won’t see our video of that on TechMeme either.

Nor will you see the video that we did with the CEO of the National Cable and Telecommunications Association that’ll be up on Monday. Nor will you see the WorkFast.tv video we did with Tim Ferriss. In fact, out of all the videos I’ve done this year I can’t think of one that’s been on Techmeme. Heck, my tour of CERN wasn’t on TechMeme, nor was our visit to IBM’s Research Center.

So, if I’m not chasing Techmeme anymore, what am I chasing? FriendFeed and Twitter. They are, together, where the audience that I really care about is hanging out. Who do I care about? Early adopters who want to have conversations with smart people about smart things.

Well, because FriendFeed’ers care about learning something new about the industry and not just getting entertained by the latest sensationalism.

Interesting that Dave Winer just shipped a new tech news site. Why? He’s disatisfied with Techmeme too. Funny, too, that I was talking with a journalist from a major news organization a couple of weeks back. He said “we only get 1,400 visitors when we’re at the top of Techmeme — that’s statistically insignificant.” I answered back “I am getting more visitors lately from Twitter and FriendFeed and the audience I get is more engaged and is usually reading Techmeme anyway.”

But, just in case, FastCompany.tv is one of the advertisers on TechMeme now and I do read it a couple times a day just to see if I missed something (it’s been a long time, though, that it caught something that hadn’t already been discussed over on FriendFeed).

As another example, look at the kinds of things I’ve “Liked” on FriendFeed lately. Now compare that to TechMeme. Which one is more interesting? Why?

It’s OK if you say Techmeme is more entertaining. It is.

But is that all you want out of your tech bloggers and journalists?

69 thoughts on “Off of the tech entertainment train

  1. My bad. Maybe I should clarify my issues a bit. To me dialogue is more about detailed discussions than comments. Or maybe I just need better friends but even your Friendfeed is full of more comments than conversations or discussions. When I look for dialogue I look for conversations where anyone can control where the conversation goes. I look for a thoughtful exchange of ideas and knowledge that builds upon one another. The medium may allow for that but most of what is out there is simply comments. The importance of dialogue (to me) is that it engages people in an exchange that leads people to learn from one another through iterative discussions (like this). Thanks for the reply, it’s the best way to disprove my point. In short, I yearn for more elaboration of ideas than simple comments. You know, people who explain their premises and the conclusions to which they lead and are open to engaging others others in debating them so everyone learns from the exchange. I know it’s difficult when there’s only so many hours in a day and when there are too many posts to comment on. It just appears to me that quantity has surpassed quality on services like Twitter than Friendfeed. Maybe that’s just a side effect of casual chat/conversations, they are less intellectually engaging and more about expressing or articulating opinions or ideas. Or maybe I just need better networks. I look for more than just people ‘chiming in’.

  2. My bad. Maybe I should clarify my issues a bit. To me dialogue is more about detailed discussions than comments. Or maybe I just need better friends but even your Friendfeed is full of more comments than conversations or discussions. When I look for dialogue I look for conversations where anyone can control where the conversation goes. I look for a thoughtful exchange of ideas and knowledge that builds upon one another. The medium may allow for that but most of what is out there is simply comments. The importance of dialogue (to me) is that it engages people in an exchange that leads people to learn from one another through iterative discussions (like this). Thanks for the reply, it’s the best way to disprove my point. In short, I yearn for more elaboration of ideas than simple comments. You know, people who explain their premises and the conclusions to which they lead and are open to engaging others others in debating them so everyone learns from the exchange. I know it’s difficult when there’s only so many hours in a day and when there are too many posts to comment on. It just appears to me that quantity has surpassed quality on services like Twitter than Friendfeed. Maybe that’s just a side effect of casual chat/conversations, they are less intellectually engaging and more about expressing or articulating opinions or ideas. Or maybe I just need better networks. I look for more than just people ‘chiming in’.

  3. So I have to ask, just how to friendfeed and twitter promote dialogue/conversations? They are part of the narcissistic web 2.0 where people shout look at me me me and aren’t about conversations, discussions, critical thinking or dialogue. Even blog comments are fly by methods for people to post opinions and feedback rather than engage in threaded conversations where people. So tell me o’ master of the one way talkers, where’s the dialogue that once made the web a valuable medium?

  4. So I have to ask, just how to friendfeed and twitter promote dialogue/conversations? They are part of the narcissistic web 2.0 where people shout look at me me me and aren’t about conversations, discussions, critical thinking or dialogue. Even blog comments are fly by methods for people to post opinions and feedback rather than engage in threaded conversations where people. So tell me o’ master of the one way talkers, where’s the dialogue that once made the web a valuable medium?

  5. I think you’ve hit on an important issue – at least for me. Techmeme really represents a very narrow view of the world. In fact, it usually reflects a very narrow view of a narrow part of the technology industry even. If Techmeme were your only source of information, you’d think the entire world comprised of a small handful of individuals, talking about one topic, and mostly it was about each other.

  6. I think you’ve hit on an important issue – at least for me. Techmeme really represents a very narrow view of the world. In fact, it usually reflects a very narrow view of a narrow part of the technology industry even. If Techmeme were your only source of information, you’d think the entire world comprised of a small handful of individuals, talking about one topic, and mostly it was about each other.

  7. I like your videos a lot! so I agree with Dawn Douglass, your videos should be visible on Scobleizer.com. Not as links but like clickable photos. Why?
    1. I’d associate them directly with you. (not that you didn’t make them but still)
    2. Visually it would make your blog more appealing, eeh…entertaining?
    3. It’s faster ;-)

  8. I like your videos a lot! so I agree with Dawn Douglass, your videos should be visible on Scobleizer.com. Not as links but like clickable photos. Why?
    1. I’d associate them directly with you. (not that you didn’t make them but still)
    2. Visually it would make your blog more appealing, eeh…entertaining?
    3. It’s faster ;-)

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