My fellow Democrats

I just visited the 9/11 memorial at the Pentagon today and the Holocaust Museum in Washington DC.

Those experiences, among others, have led me to this note.

To everyone else, sorry, this is one of those times I’m going to get into politics. If you don’t like that, come back tomorrow when I’ll be at AT&T and talking about the cool technology they are showing me.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

My fellow Democrats,

I keep seeing you, and the press, taking pot shots at Sarah Palin. I’ve taken a few myself, if you’ve been over on FriendFeed the past couple of weeks.

You also know that I’ve been demoralized lately and believe that John McCain and Sarah Palin have, through the changing of the framing of the imagery presented to the American people, have already won the election.

But today I’m calling on you to be better than the Republicans.

Instead of aiming at Palin’s groin, let’s aspire to be better.

This is America. When we aspire to be better than we are, we change the world.

When John Kennedy asked us to go to the moon, we did. When Martin Luther King said he has a dream we’ve made his dream happen. When Ronald Reagan told the Germans to “tear down this wall” they did.

When we try to make the world better, we often do!

It’s time, my fellow Democrats, to start living that change.

Instead of blogging about our political opponents, can you learn about one issue that you care about and blog about that?

My issue is that I’m seeing high tech jobs leaving America for a variety of reasons.

1. Our education system. Today’s CEOs say they aren’t seeing the quality of graduates that they need to make the next big scientific and technological breakthroughs. After the cameras are off I keep hearing about the better graduates in places like Israel, China, and India.
2. Our taxation and infrastructure. When I went to Israel I interviewed Gil Shwed, CEO of CheckPoint. They have offices in California and Israel. You should listen to the video because he tells how it’s easier for him to get stuff done in Israel than in California.
2b. Our infrastructure is wacked. When we’re 19th in the world in broadband and way behind even China in the use of IPTV and other technologies that can be used to wire new R&D workers together, that tells me we’ve lost leadership and that it’ll take a concerted effort to get it back.
3. Our health care costs. CEOs are telling me they are drowning in the costs of our health care system and that’s pushing jobs overseas. Not just those manufacturing jobs, either (many of the people reading my blog are geeks and can’t relate to people who work on factory lines in places like Detroit, let’s just be honest) but the jobs going overseas are our R&D jobs that pay $150,000 a year. Lose rafts of those and you see entire economies changing.
4. Our immigration policies. It used to be that our best workers and best ideas came from people who moved here from somewhere else. But in today’s America we’re angry about immigrants who come to America to take our jobs. That anger, while justified, is causing us to close down our borders to even the smartest who come here for an education and then are forced to leave to go back home. Guess what, our globalization can’t be stopped, so every job that leaves our shores is $150,000 that will never come back (and probably more, because of the trickle down effects of our economy).
5. Our anti-science and anti-technology discourse and beliefs. In the Republican America today we are seeing a debate, not about whether science should drive our national debate, but whether religion should and, let’s just be honest, religion is winning. Stem cell research is being forced off our shores. That research will still be done, albeit now it’s done over in some other country. More $150,000 jobs down the drain. Plus, will we really invest in the right energy technologies? Who is best suited to decide those? A scientist? Or someone who lives close to an energy pipeline? We need to do better and aspire to be smarter.
6. An anti-technology and anti-science stance by those who fear government. When I wrote about America getting a CTO, I was amazed at some of the pushback I got in comments. Driven by fear. An inefficient government is a good thing, quite a few said. After getting out of the Holocaust Museum today, I understand where that fear comes from, but it’s misplaced and misguided because that fear will cause policies that cause us to lose more and more of our $150,000 a year jobs.

So, my fellow Democrats, can we have a debate about what government should DO over the next four years? What, my fellow Democrats, can we do to be better than ourselves? To make the world a better place?

We have only a week or two before the debates to give Barack Obama some real, tangible things to call us to aspire to.

If he aims for the fences and calls on us to build a better world, then we have a shot November 2.

If we only aim for Palin’s knees we play into the Republican’s game and we’ll end up with more of the same for the next four years.

It’s all up to you now. Every post you make. Every conversation you have. They all add up to what will happen November 2.

Will you call on your fellow Americans to be better? Or will you point out what a wacky lady Palin is.

The more you point what a wacky lady she is, the more likely you are to help Republicans win. After all, we’re all wacky and we all love to vote for someone like us: unless someone is calling on us to be better.

So, my fellow Democrats, I hope you’ll join me in focusing totally on building a strong economy for the future for the next four weeks. That’s our only hope.

Thank you, your friend and supporter, Robert Scoble

UPDATE: Over on FriendFeed they are discussing this post and imran stated that the trillion dollar war with Iraq is also draining our resources and making it hard to compete on a global stage. Good point.

336 thoughts on “My fellow Democrats

  1. @Jonathan. Reagan…”Spend tons on defense and then use the deficit as an excuse to cut social programs.”

    You say that as if it were a bad thing. Spending tons on defense? Well, excuse Reagan for actually spending tax dollars as The Constitution outlines. For shame!!!!.

    Cut social programs? Again, excuse Mr. Reagan for trying to get rid of programs that, Constitutionally, should never have been set up by the Federal Government in the first place. Boy, it really sucks when you have a President that takes seriously his oath to “PRESERVE, PROTECT, and DEFEND the Constitution of the United States”. Unfortunately, few Presidents in recent memory have even understood what that oath means. Not to mention the majority of the left.

  2. @Jonathan. Reagan…”Spend tons on defense and then use the deficit as an excuse to cut social programs.”

    You say that as if it were a bad thing. Spending tons on defense? Well, excuse Reagan for actually spending tax dollars as The Constitution outlines. For shame!!!!.

    Cut social programs? Again, excuse Mr. Reagan for trying to get rid of programs that, Constitutionally, should never have been set up by the Federal Government in the first place. Boy, it really sucks when you have a President that takes seriously his oath to “PRESERVE, PROTECT, and DEFEND the Constitution of the United States”. Unfortunately, few Presidents in recent memory have even understood what that oath means. Not to mention the majority of the left.

  3. Hello Robert,
    You raise some interesting points. I don’t agree with you about everything, but I appreciate your call to a renewed civility in political discourse.

    I should mention that I’m an independent who tends to lean right, but I am interested in what both sides have to say. You are right to imply that the more time that the Democrats spend attacking Palin, with mean-spirited and snobbish attacks in my opinion, the less likely I will be to consider their ideas. But then, as a person of faith, I am also less inclined to consider someone’s ideas when I sense that I’m being pandered to or talked down to because of my beliefs.

    That being said, I remain unconvinced that simply throwing more tax dollars at big problems is the way to encourage the innovation and risk-taking needed to solve those problems. I have dealt with a wide range of companies in my life, some of them awful but many of them great, useful, and magnificent. On the other hand, I have had very few barely- acceptable experiences with government, many bad experiences, but never great and magnificent ones.

    Typically, my frustrating experiences at the DMV come to mind when I think of government services: long lines, poor service, and unnecessarily bureaucratic policies. The DMV can get away with that because they know that I have no alternatives. I can’t take my business elsewhere.

    But, the tech companies that you cover know that they have to be consistently excellent to keep me coming back. Are there still bad tech companies? Of course. But the status quo doesn’t encourage their complacency in the way that it does for too many government services. So why does it make sense to give government even more responsibilities, when it has failed, for the most part, to be exceptional in what it already does?

    If the Democrats positioned themselves as the party that embraces entrepreneurs and encourages people to take risks and if they didn’t campaign so heavily on taxing (punishing) the rich for their success, then I would be more inclined to vote for them.

    In other words, your fellow Democrats should spend less time talking down to people of faith and mocking likable, unpretentious people like Palin, and you should spend more time convincing people like me that you have good ideas to spark innovation and growth. Maybe then I would listen. Otherwise, I might just cling to my guns and my religion and vote for the other guys.

  4. Hello Robert,
    You raise some interesting points. I don’t agree with you about everything, but I appreciate your call to a renewed civility in political discourse.

    I should mention that I’m an independent who tends to lean right, but I am interested in what both sides have to say. You are right to imply that the more time that the Democrats spend attacking Palin, with mean-spirited and snobbish attacks in my opinion, the less likely I will be to consider their ideas. But then, as a person of faith, I am also less inclined to consider someone’s ideas when I sense that I’m being pandered to or talked down to because of my beliefs.

    That being said, I remain unconvinced that simply throwing more tax dollars at big problems is the way to encourage the innovation and risk-taking needed to solve those problems. I have dealt with a wide range of companies in my life, some of them awful but many of them great, useful, and magnificent. On the other hand, I have had very few barely- acceptable experiences with government, many bad experiences, but never great and magnificent ones.

    Typically, my frustrating experiences at the DMV come to mind when I think of government services: long lines, poor service, and unnecessarily bureaucratic policies. The DMV can get away with that because they know that I have no alternatives. I can’t take my business elsewhere.

    But, the tech companies that you cover know that they have to be consistently excellent to keep me coming back. Are there still bad tech companies? Of course. But the status quo doesn’t encourage their complacency in the way that it does for too many government services. So why does it make sense to give government even more responsibilities, when it has failed, for the most part, to be exceptional in what it already does?

    If the Democrats positioned themselves as the party that embraces entrepreneurs and encourages people to take risks and if they didn’t campaign so heavily on taxing (punishing) the rich for their success, then I would be more inclined to vote for them.

    In other words, your fellow Democrats should spend less time talking down to people of faith and mocking likable, unpretentious people like Palin, and you should spend more time convincing people like me that you have good ideas to spark innovation and growth. Maybe then I would listen. Otherwise, I might just cling to my guns and my religion and vote for the other guys.

  5. Netposer: In response to part of your blog, the fact is that George W. Bush never, let me repeat, never lowered taxes for the rich. He lowered marginal tax rates for everyone and as a result, the rich are now paying a higher percentage of income tax than at any time under President Clinton.

  6. Netposer: In response to part of your blog, the fact is that George W. Bush never, let me repeat, never lowered taxes for the rich. He lowered marginal tax rates for everyone and as a result, the rich are now paying a higher percentage of income tax than at any time under President Clinton.

  7. Robert:
    An excellent post, and one that I think a true believing Republican could post as well. I would offer a couple of other things to think about:

    First of all, when we have elections, we generally accept the outcomes, settle down, and go about our business. We do not man the barricades and storm the White House. This type of nasty discourse is a part of our political and societal nature. Please remember the vicious stories and attacks against a president that many consider to be out best — Abe Lincoln! He was often portrayed in the press as an Ape!

    Secondly, when someone run on the issues, they get about 5% of the vote. Witness the lack of success of issued minded candidates such as Ron Paul and Ralph Nadar.

    Finally, Pogo said it best ” I have seen the enemy and he is us!” If enough people are disgusted by this type of campaign, they will vote for something different. However, the prurient pleasure must outweigh the disgust because campaigns are getting worse.

  8. Robert:
    An excellent post, and one that I think a true believing Republican could post as well. I would offer a couple of other things to think about:

    First of all, when we have elections, we generally accept the outcomes, settle down, and go about our business. We do not man the barricades and storm the White House. This type of nasty discourse is a part of our political and societal nature. Please remember the vicious stories and attacks against a president that many consider to be out best — Abe Lincoln! He was often portrayed in the press as an Ape!

    Secondly, when someone run on the issues, they get about 5% of the vote. Witness the lack of success of issued minded candidates such as Ron Paul and Ralph Nadar.

    Finally, Pogo said it best ” I have seen the enemy and he is us!” If enough people are disgusted by this type of campaign, they will vote for something different. However, the prurient pleasure must outweigh the disgust because campaigns are getting worse.

  9. I wasn’t going to post again but today I am truly embarrassed for my country. I really am. Our candidates for the highest office in the land have proved themselves to be, well, downright awful. On the one hand you have McCain’s assinine fundamentals quote. Maybe you could stretch it and say “well he’s just trying to be reassuring in this troubled time” but he backed it up with such lame-ass reason. Then you have Obama with his “get in their face” street rhetoric. This is really pathetic. Absolutely pathetic. On top of that he wants his followers (it sounded like to me) to be antagonistic to their neighbors and maybe out and out lie – you see he says to argue that he’s not going raise taxes (didn’t he say he’d role back the bush tax cuts… that would raise taxes since you’d be paying more but I don’t have the patience to look it up right now, I am so fuming), meanwhile his VP is out talking about how it is patriotic to give more to government! To a bunch of people that have shown almost zero ability to or willingness to peek around corners and solve problems. Pelosi and Reid are absolutely pathetic. I don’t how anyone can ask me to vote for a guy that asks me to get in my neighbors face.

    Like the old legend, we are all Nero, and Rome is burning.

  10. I wasn’t going to post again but today I am truly embarrassed for my country. I really am. Our candidates for the highest office in the land have proved themselves to be, well, downright awful. On the one hand you have McCain’s assinine fundamentals quote. Maybe you could stretch it and say “well he’s just trying to be reassuring in this troubled time” but he backed it up with such lame-ass reason. Then you have Obama with his “get in their face” street rhetoric. This is really pathetic. Absolutely pathetic. On top of that he wants his followers (it sounded like to me) to be antagonistic to their neighbors and maybe out and out lie – you see he says to argue that he’s not going raise taxes (didn’t he say he’d role back the bush tax cuts… that would raise taxes since you’d be paying more but I don’t have the patience to look it up right now, I am so fuming), meanwhile his VP is out talking about how it is patriotic to give more to government! To a bunch of people that have shown almost zero ability to or willingness to peek around corners and solve problems. Pelosi and Reid are absolutely pathetic. I don’t how anyone can ask me to vote for a guy that asks me to get in my neighbors face.

    Like the old legend, we are all Nero, and Rome is burning.

  11. good post Robert

    Mike Obama is a radical socialist lol more a very wet one nation tory or a rightwing Limb dem or a nu labour type.

    This is my take on the us political scene.

    I think part of the problem the USA has is its political structure is set up for a bunch of landowning enlightenment types who wanted to keep power in their hands. The other problem is that the religious right captured the republican party like the trots tried and failed to do in the 80’s to the labour party.

    There is a good theory that the reason why the USA doesn’t play cricket is that the gentlemen (posh types think Boris Johnson) didn’t want to play with the players (lower class labourers and servants)

    Also the scary part for the rest of the world is the way such inexperienced people can get to such a powerful position with out pervious experience why did McCain not get Condi as his VP.

    It would almost be like if an old flame of mine suddenly got picked be David Cameron’s deputy (she’s a local conservative councillor at the moment)

  12. good post Robert

    Mike Obama is a radical socialist lol more a very wet one nation tory or a rightwing Limb dem or a nu labour type.

    This is my take on the us political scene.

    I think part of the problem the USA has is its political structure is set up for a bunch of landowning enlightenment types who wanted to keep power in their hands. The other problem is that the religious right captured the republican party like the trots tried and failed to do in the 80’s to the labour party.

    There is a good theory that the reason why the USA doesn’t play cricket is that the gentlemen (posh types think Boris Johnson) didn’t want to play with the players (lower class labourers and servants)

    Also the scary part for the rest of the world is the way such inexperienced people can get to such a powerful position with out pervious experience why did McCain not get Condi as his VP.

    It would almost be like if an old flame of mine suddenly got picked be David Cameron’s deputy (she’s a local conservative councillor at the moment)

  13. Through various programs, govt already provides health care to about half of Americans. If you believe that govt health care will be cheaper for all Americans, shouldn’t you first explain why govt health care for half of americans costs about the same as private health care for a comparable number of people?

    Better yet, make govt health care cheaper than private and make it available as a choice.

    If you can’t make govt health care cheaper for half of Americans, why should anyone believe that you can make it cheaper for all?

  14. Through various programs, govt already provides health care to about half of Americans. If you believe that govt health care will be cheaper for all Americans, shouldn’t you first explain why govt health care for half of americans costs about the same as private health care for a comparable number of people?

    Better yet, make govt health care cheaper than private and make it available as a choice.

    If you can’t make govt health care cheaper for half of Americans, why should anyone believe that you can make it cheaper for all?

  15. Robert, great post, it’s about taking the high road, which seems to be out of vogue these days.

    Two things, you should take a look at this video of Barack Obama that David Weinberger posted — I wish more of these ads would be shown on TV.

    http://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1185304443/bctid1799203760

    Second, I have to respond to this obsession people had with Reagan. People think he was great and he WAS charismatic. He also drove the country’s budget into the gutter like W has done. Spend tons on defense and then use the deficit as an excuse to cut social programs.

  16. Robert, great post, it’s about taking the high road, which seems to be out of vogue these days.

    Two things, you should take a look at this video of Barack Obama that David Weinberger posted — I wish more of these ads would be shown on TV.

    http://link.brightcove.com/services/link/bcpid1185304443/bctid1799203760

    Second, I have to respond to this obsession people had with Reagan. People think he was great and he WAS charismatic. He also drove the country’s budget into the gutter like W has done. Spend tons on defense and then use the deficit as an excuse to cut social programs.

  17. “it is NOT the insurance companies, but rather it is the extremely liberal judicial system that we have had now for decades in our country. ”

    Vander,

    Liability costs are a major factor, but they pale in comparison to the procedural costs imposed by the FDA and other regulatory agencies. Look up what it costs to get a drug, device, or treatment through the FDA approval process. It will turn your hair white.

  18. “it is NOT the insurance companies, but rather it is the extremely liberal judicial system that we have had now for decades in our country. ”

    Vander,

    Liability costs are a major factor, but they pale in comparison to the procedural costs imposed by the FDA and other regulatory agencies. Look up what it costs to get a drug, device, or treatment through the FDA approval process. It will turn your hair white.

  19. “My issue is that I’m seeing high tech jobs leaving America for a variety of reasons.”

    Scoble, this is Chris, banned from Channel 9 Chris. When I left Canada, I had business expenses that exceed the business revenue. The situation with programmers was absolutely aweful. I had fired over 10 employees. The Canadian dollar was worth more than the US dollar and yet gas was $7-8 a gallon while it was $3-4 here.

    Now that I’m in LA, I make almost as much as you do, and I have a great job.

    Just take a look at Craigslist. There is plenty of opportunity in California and the USA.

    “But in today’s America we’re angry about immigrants who come to America to take our jobs. ”

    The programmers I was with in Canada would literally kill somebody almost to have jobs like the jobs that are available in SF and LA. If we simply let them all in, it will drive our salaries down..

    If their government let them down, let them wrestle with their own politics over where they are.

    California is so much better than Canada and every other country it’s not even funny. It’s like California is a plateau, and you look down on the rest of the world.

    At any rate, the USA is the best country in the world, and frankly it should be the best country in the world for us.

    Throw your bottles and cans now. I’m voting McCain. Not that it matters who you vote for. The day after the election, it will be the same sh1t on a different day no matter who’s coming into office.

  20. “My issue is that I’m seeing high tech jobs leaving America for a variety of reasons.”

    Scoble, this is Chris, banned from Channel 9 Chris. When I left Canada, I had business expenses that exceed the business revenue. The situation with programmers was absolutely aweful. I had fired over 10 employees. The Canadian dollar was worth more than the US dollar and yet gas was $7-8 a gallon while it was $3-4 here.

    Now that I’m in LA, I make almost as much as you do, and I have a great job.

    Just take a look at Craigslist. There is plenty of opportunity in California and the USA.

    “But in today’s America we’re angry about immigrants who come to America to take our jobs. ”

    The programmers I was with in Canada would literally kill somebody almost to have jobs like the jobs that are available in SF and LA. If we simply let them all in, it will drive our salaries down..

    If their government let them down, let them wrestle with their own politics over where they are.

    California is so much better than Canada and every other country it’s not even funny. It’s like California is a plateau, and you look down on the rest of the world.

    At any rate, the USA is the best country in the world, and frankly it should be the best country in the world for us.

    Throw your bottles and cans now. I’m voting McCain. Not that it matters who you vote for. The day after the election, it will be the same sh1t on a different day no matter who’s coming into office.

  21. “The concentration of financial power is stunning. There are now only two investment banks left on Wall Street. Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs”

    Yep. The effect of government interference in markets is always to drive consolidation into larger organizations. The bigger a company is, the better it’s able to cope with the absurd regulations imposed upon it.

    That’s why most of us are one of millions of customers of a behemoth like Kaiser, instead of one of a couple hundred customers of a family medical practice. Regulation forces consolidation, and never forget that government is the ultimate monopoly.

    I’ve been involved with a couple of startups in my career, and even before we made our first dollar in revenues, we easily spent a third of our capital and half of our senior management’s time on complying with regulation and taxation.

  22. “The concentration of financial power is stunning. There are now only two investment banks left on Wall Street. Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs”

    Yep. The effect of government interference in markets is always to drive consolidation into larger organizations. The bigger a company is, the better it’s able to cope with the absurd regulations imposed upon it.

    That’s why most of us are one of millions of customers of a behemoth like Kaiser, instead of one of a couple hundred customers of a family medical practice. Regulation forces consolidation, and never forget that government is the ultimate monopoly.

    I’ve been involved with a couple of startups in my career, and even before we made our first dollar in revenues, we easily spent a third of our capital and half of our senior management’s time on complying with regulation and taxation.

  23. Let me toss out a wild idea here.. Our problem isn’t that our government doesn’t do enough, it’s that the government does far too much.

    We have this document called the Constitution of the United States. It’s not perfect, but it’s a damn sight better than what we have now. Nearly every problem we have today can be traced directly to government expanding its power beyond those granted by the constitution, from the war, to our failing schools, to our ridiculously expensive health care system.

  24. Let me toss out a wild idea here.. Our problem isn’t that our government doesn’t do enough, it’s that the government does far too much.

    We have this document called the Constitution of the United States. It’s not perfect, but it’s a damn sight better than what we have now. Nearly every problem we have today can be traced directly to government expanding its power beyond those granted by the constitution, from the war, to our failing schools, to our ridiculously expensive health care system.

  25. @Tim. Well, then I’ll go back to my point they we really don’t care what the rest of the world thinks. Because at the end of the day we know who they will come to for help. I mean, good luck trying to get the French to help you. The British, maybe. So, go on thinking we are an embarrassment, and we’ll keep running the world as we please, because…well, we can.

  26. @Tim. Well, then I’ll go back to my point they we really don’t care what the rest of the world thinks. Because at the end of the day we know who they will come to for help. I mean, good luck trying to get the French to help you. The British, maybe. So, go on thinking we are an embarrassment, and we’ll keep running the world as we please, because…well, we can.

  27. When John Kennedy asked us to go to the moon, we did. When Martin Luther King said he has a dream we’ve made his dream happen. When Ronald Reagan told the Germans to “tear down this wall” they did.

    * John Kennedy would have been thrown out of the MoveOn-controlled Democratic Party for his pro-war, pro-freedom agenda. Look at Joe Lieberman for an example.

    * MLK was, of course, a Republican

    * Reagan was, of course, a Republican who was _pilloried_ in the press and by Democrats for that particular statement, SDI (which turns out to be a blessing for Israel and our European allies), and pro-growth strategies.

    Please don’t equate Barack Obama with any of those three great figures. Obama has affiliated solely with communists, terrorists and Islamists his entire career… during which I can’t find a single noteworthy accomplishment (other than his wonderful speech-making).

    Though his brownshirts have been good at intimidating WGN in Chicago for daring to discuss his Annenberg Challenge failures and links to Bill Ayers.

    But, if Obama wins, perhaps he could name Democrat Jamie Gorelick his AG. There’s a reason she’s called the “Mistress of Disaster”: she played key roles in both 9/11 and the raping and pillaging of Fannie Mae.

  28. When John Kennedy asked us to go to the moon, we did. When Martin Luther King said he has a dream we’ve made his dream happen. When Ronald Reagan told the Germans to “tear down this wall” they did.

    * John Kennedy would have been thrown out of the MoveOn-controlled Democratic Party for his pro-war, pro-freedom agenda. Look at Joe Lieberman for an example.

    * MLK was, of course, a Republican

    * Reagan was, of course, a Republican who was _pilloried_ in the press and by Democrats for that particular statement, SDI (which turns out to be a blessing for Israel and our European allies), and pro-growth strategies.

    Please don’t equate Barack Obama with any of those three great figures. Obama has affiliated solely with communists, terrorists and Islamists his entire career… during which I can’t find a single noteworthy accomplishment (other than his wonderful speech-making).

    Though his brownshirts have been good at intimidating WGN in Chicago for daring to discuss his Annenberg Challenge failures and links to Bill Ayers.

    But, if Obama wins, perhaps he could name Democrat Jamie Gorelick his AG. There’s a reason she’s called the “Mistress of Disaster”: she played key roles in both 9/11 and the raping and pillaging of Fannie Mae.

  29. The problem with the Democrats answer to issue #3 is that they don’t look at what caused the problem in the first place. If you look at what has caused the sky rocketing cost of health care in the United States, it is NOT the insurance companies, but rather it is the extremely liberal judicial system that we have had now for decades in our country. The answer to lowering health care costs (thereby making it available to more people at lower income levels) is to shut down all of the frivolous lawsuits that occur and cost both the medical system and the insurance company billions in legal fees every year. This solution would not only lower costs, but would result in a much more open selection ability when it comes to picking medical options for the average American.

  30. The problem with the Democrats answer to issue #3 is that they don’t look at what caused the problem in the first place. If you look at what has caused the sky rocketing cost of health care in the United States, it is NOT the insurance companies, but rather it is the extremely liberal judicial system that we have had now for decades in our country. The answer to lowering health care costs (thereby making it available to more people at lower income levels) is to shut down all of the frivolous lawsuits that occur and cost both the medical system and the insurance company billions in legal fees every year. This solution would not only lower costs, but would result in a much more open selection ability when it comes to picking medical options for the average American.

  31. Dawn, can you share some links to your scientific study on global cooling? (Statements from Marc Morano or any other politicial (including Al Gore) doesn’t count). Is this global cooling man made? Should I be turning off my fridge?

    I would ask for a study on your countless observable miracles as well, but I realize that’s a pointless question.

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