Jive finishes up my enterprise disruption week

[kyte.tv appKey=MarbachViewerEmbedded&uri=channels/6118/303804&tbid=k_1254&premium=true&height=500&width=425]

This week I’ve touched base with Panorama Software, socialtext, and now with Jive Software. Jive continued the trend I discussed a couple of days ago about enterprise disruption.

You are meeting quite a few of the companies that are disrupting the older players and trying to, as Jive’s CMO xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, said, open up a new social space inside companies. Hope you’re enjoying this look at the players. We’ll bring you others after CES.

Anyway, here’s Sam Lawrence of Jive Software, who talks with me about the economy, how they are competing with Sharepoint, and that they are working on a new version to be released in March.

Comments

  1. More articles on disruption. Good luck Jive. Bring on the Evolution. We have a basic belief in disruption, and have (for now) moved away from a strap line for our concept MIVUI (in prototyping) which was going to be Devolution… Evolution…

    Disruption = Vacuum…
    Vacuum = Savings [*]
    Savings = Devolution…
    Devolution = Evolution
    Evolution = …

    [* consumer]

  2. More articles on disruption. Good luck Jive. Bring on the Evolution. We have a basic belief in disruption, and have (for now) moved away from a strap line for our concept MIVUI (in prototyping) which was going to be Devolution… Evolution…

    Disruption = Vacuum…
    Vacuum = Savings [*]
    Savings = Devolution…
    Devolution = Evolution
    Evolution = …

    [* consumer]

  3. The fundamental enterprise disruptions are more… fundamental. Take hosted Gmail, the one useful app in Google Apps. The main barrier here is awareness.

    Right now, for $50 per seat-year, you get Gmail with your own domain name, essentially infinite storage, essentially perfect spam control, easy routing, programmer API, administrator panel, etc., etc.

    I spent a few years as admin on both Exchange Server and qmail. For most organizations, even large ones, this is a huge leap forward.

    I don’t know who is going to spend thousands of dollars on Exchange software, thousands more on training and support, after they’ve seen Paree.

  4. The fundamental enterprise disruptions are more… fundamental. Take hosted Gmail, the one useful app in Google Apps. The main barrier here is awareness.

    Right now, for $50 per seat-year, you get Gmail with your own domain name, essentially infinite storage, essentially perfect spam control, easy routing, programmer API, administrator panel, etc., etc.

    I spent a few years as admin on both Exchange Server and qmail. For most organizations, even large ones, this is a huge leap forward.

    I don’t know who is going to spend thousands of dollars on Exchange software, thousands more on training and support, after they’ve seen Paree.

  5. The one thing that is conspicuously absent from all this excitement about enterprise disruption is this: these tools are only able to disrupt inasmuch as people are able to change their entire weltanschauung to make use of them. The task of distinguishing the new ideas from the old is basically complete (or in the process of completing itself) but what has yet to happen is the reintegration of these new ideas into existing institutions. Just putting Jive in the enterprise is not tantamount to actually having changed anyone’s approach to anything.

    If the human part of this puzzle continues to be lost under the propeller-head geek chic, I fear this brave new world could take longer to manifest than we might like. Or worse, the incommensurable distance between the old and new might yield violent social paroxysms.

    Now, like, follow me on twitter and stuff.

  6. The one thing that is conspicuously absent from all this excitement about enterprise disruption is this: these tools are only able to disrupt inasmuch as people are able to change their entire weltanschauung to make use of them. The task of distinguishing the new ideas from the old is basically complete (or in the process of completing itself) but what has yet to happen is the reintegration of these new ideas into existing institutions. Just putting Jive in the enterprise is not tantamount to actually having changed anyone’s approach to anything.

    If the human part of this puzzle continues to be lost under the propeller-head geek chic, I fear this brave new world could take longer to manifest than we might like. Or worse, the incommensurable distance between the old and new might yield violent social paroxysms.

    Now, like, follow me on twitter and stuff.

  7. Another company that does very interesting and similar things (customer collaboration in product development and marketing, as well as internal “web2.0″ social networks) is ThinkPassenger.

    I interviewed with them about 6 months ago and they are doing some very interesting things with Fortune 500 companies, including Apple.

    (Of course, the Apple stuff is all internal.)

  8. Another company that does very interesting and similar things (customer collaboration in product development and marketing, as well as internal “web2.0″ social networks) is ThinkPassenger.

    I interviewed with them about 6 months ago and they are doing some very interesting things with Fortune 500 companies, including Apple.

    (Of course, the Apple stuff is all internal.)

  9. Robert, enterprise disruption – please.

    Much as I like what these tools are doing they don’t help companies trade, control manufacturing or logistics, or cut payroll or do global accounting or design products or manage customer relationships.

    It is a category of collaboration tools that does itself a disservice by over defining itself as “the” enterprise.

    It is a small sliver of the enterprise…

  10. Robert, enterprise disruption – please.

    Much as I like what these tools are doing they don’t help companies trade, control manufacturing or logistics, or cut payroll or do global accounting or design products or manage customer relationships.

    It is a category of collaboration tools that does itself a disservice by over defining itself as “the” enterprise.

    It is a small sliver of the enterprise…

  11. Vinnie, I respectfully disagree with your assessment. The enterprise, as you appear to be defining it is predicated entirely upon enlightenment paradigm structures. Social media is non-deterministic and the causal relationships which it reveals are non-linear. Those facts alone put these kinds of tools squarely in opposition to the top-down hierarchical models which typify enlightenment institutions.

    I can give you pragmatic examples of structures which are predicated almost entirely on the kinds of systems which typify social media tools; examples which are complete systems designed to carry off sophisticated tasks. For just one such example, consider the architecture of Jumbo ( http://bit.ly/1Bx1rX ). There is no area of the enterprise of which I can think which couldn’t be transformed by models like Jumbo.

  12. Vinnie, I respectfully disagree with your assessment. The enterprise, as you appear to be defining it is predicated entirely upon enlightenment paradigm structures. Social media is non-deterministic and the causal relationships which it reveals are non-linear. Those facts alone put these kinds of tools squarely in opposition to the top-down hierarchical models which typify enlightenment institutions.

    I can give you pragmatic examples of structures which are predicated almost entirely on the kinds of systems which typify social media tools; examples which are complete systems designed to carry off sophisticated tasks. For just one such example, consider the architecture of Jumbo ( http://bit.ly/1Bx1rX ). There is no area of the enterprise of which I can think which couldn’t be transformed by models like Jumbo.

  13. Eliot, as one of my early mentors used to ask during any IT application project approval process:

    what do it do?

    can these tools do gross to net payroll calculations. No.
    can they calculate sales commissions. No.
    can they do currency conversions. No.
    can they optimize ship-from locations. No.

    I can go on and on. If they cannot do so much why do they egotistically insist on calling themselves “the enterprise”

    Social computing, Wiki, collaboration – a narrower term is much more appropriate.

    That’s my issue not that the tools are not useful

  14. Eliot, as one of my early mentors used to ask during any IT application project approval process:

    what do it do?

    can these tools do gross to net payroll calculations. No.
    can they calculate sales commissions. No.
    can they do currency conversions. No.
    can they optimize ship-from locations. No.

    I can go on and on. If they cannot do so much why do they egotistically insist on calling themselves “the enterprise”

    Social computing, Wiki, collaboration – a narrower term is much more appropriate.

    That’s my issue not that the tools are not useful