Exploring the 2010 Web

To build something new you have to destroy what you were doing before. That’s one thing that not enough of us do. Las Vegas does that. They tear down one of their favorite old casinos to make way for something new.

That’s what I had to do to my blog. For the past year it felt like a boat anchor wrapped around my neck. It was more and more like work (because, well, it was) and less and less about personal discovery or anything really valuable.

All my fun experiments were over on Twitter, Facebook, or friendfeed. You could see that. Mike Arrington even tried to do a friendfeed intervention last December. Remember that? Since then I’ve gotten 14,000 more subscribers over on friendfeed and that service has become dramatically more important as it has gone real time and added on much better search features (are are also way ahead of Facebook’s and Twitter’s).

But that is not what I’m thinking about.

What I’ve been doing for the past two months since joining Rackspace is going back to the basics. What makes me excited?

I’ve visited dozens of companies, gone to a bunch of events, and, more importantly, I started playing with my blog again.

First off I went through every line of HTML and PHP so that I understood what was going on inside WordPress again. I hadn’t done that for years. Second, we moved my blog over to a WordPress install hosted on Rackspace’s Cloud Servers, aka Mosso.

That freed my mind because now I could try out server plugins and also widgets on my blog. For instance, you’ll see in the comments here we’re using Disqus so that your comments will integrate over to friendfeed in near real time. I’m not settled on Disqus, over the next couple of weeks we’ll look at the others too. There’s a lot of innovation happening there.

Second, I’m playing with location-based services. You’ll see Google’s Latitude widget over on the right side of my blog, underneath the friendfeed one. I’ll be adding more widgets over the next few weeks too.

Oh, and also over the last couple of months I’ve been slowly working with various folks at Rackspace. After I played with the HTML here, Vid Luther took over, talked me into using a new theme, Thesis, and then integrated Facebook Connect in here and also did some other work to get my blog up to 2010 standards.

Now, you might think my new blog isn’t “visual” enough. I don’t have a picture of myself. No fancy logo or graphic banner. Those might come in the future. For me my blog isn’t about me anymore anyway. That’s more what my friendfeed set of feeds is (which is why friendfeed plays such a big part in my new design). Friendfeed aggregates my tweets, my Flickr photos, my videos, and much more together. Plus, via my likes and my comments you can see what stuff I’m reading and what catches my eye.

Which brings me back to what I’m doing now for Rackspace: I’m exploring what it means to be a 2010 website. I’ve been visiting tons of businesses and there’s a lot of businesses out there that don’t even have a web site, or if they have one, it looks like it was built in 1994.

In a couple of weeks I’m getting a new 2010 Toyota Prius. If you look at the web site, it seems to be pretty cool, right? But why doesn’t Toyota have a community, or place you can go to talk about the 2010 Prius? Toyota does have a Facebook page, but why didn’t they create a place for me to go to talk about my new Prius with other people? Why didn’t it create a YouTube account that would get hooked in here? Did you know that Toyota’s PR team is on Twitter? Yeah, they are, but you wouldn’t have known by looking at the Toyota Web site. Even over on Twitter and Google it took quite a few tries to find this page.

And that’s what I’m getting at. Toyota is one of the world’s top brands. Has TONS of money to spend on marketing. And they aren’t even taking advantage of the 2010 web. So how are smaller businesses supposed to do it?

For instance, right near Facebook is an awesome yogurt shop named Fraiche. Tons of Facebook employees frequent here. So you’d think they’d be working on a Facebook connect site so that they can let their community know when they have something new to offer, right? No.

Do they use video to tell their story? No. Do they have a friendfeed group where people who love Fraiche can talk about it? No. Is there a blog that shows some of the new things they are adding? No.

This is a business that’s run by the wife of a venture capitalist in Silicon Valley and is right in the heart of Palo Alto (a short walk away is Tapulous and Facebook). If they aren’t on the 2010 web, something is wrong.

As I’ve taken time to watch what the tech blogs are doing (I spent some time in TechCrunch’s offices this week) I see that we’ve forgotten about the mainstreet businesses.

We’ve gotten so far ahead with our social media toys that we’ve forgotten about the many many businesses that still have web sites that look like they were designed in 1994-2000. Even the Toyota site doesn’t really have much on it that wasn’t possible before 2005 (with the exception of some high resolution video).

The world has changed in the last four years and businesses, I’m convinced, will need to react to this new “2010″ world. It might take them until 2015 to really get on board, but I want to help now.

So, that’s what I’m going to do here. Focus on the 2010 web and how we can help businesses get there. That’s also what we’ll be doing over on Building43. By the way, we’ll be launching that sometime in June, sorry for being a little quiet about that. Turns out that building a community from scratch and figuring out a direction takes some time to just sit and think.

“OK, Scoble, so what are you learning about the 2010 web so far?”

Well, I’m seeing it has a few attributes:

1. It’s real time. Twitter, Facebook and Friendfeed are all moving toward architectures and displays that refresh in real time, or let you see what’s happening right now. We are at the extreme beginnings of that trend. You really should watch the video of the panel discussion I moderated on the state of real time search to get a sense of where this is going. That panel discussion will be remembered for years as a key point. One of the panel members runs Facebook search team. Yes, Facebook is working on real time search. (That video is in two parts since the meeting ran almost two hours long. I really do recommend watching it. Part I is here. Part II is here.).
2. It’s mobile. You’ll see this more next week when the Where 2.0 conference rolls into town, but if 40,000 iPhone apps hasn’t convinced you yet, nothing will. On Monday I’m meeting with Nokia to find out the latest.
3. It’s decentralized. Look at my behaviors. I’m all over the place. Six years ago I did only one thing: blog. Now I Flickr. YouTube. Seesmic. Friendfeed. Facebook. Twitter. And many more. Go to Retaggr and see all the places I’m at.
4. Pages now built out of premade blocks. You build these pages by copying a line of Javascript code to your template. This is very simple once you see how to do it, but for someone who doesn’t know code, or where in the template to go, this is VERY daunting. Silicon Valley has NOT made it simple enough yet for the mainstream to build highly useful pages. See the friendfeed block to the right of my words? I added that by copying and pasting from the friendfeed widget page. If you know where to look a TON of cool pre-built blocks like this are available for you to put on your website or blog.
5. It’s social. This seems obvious to anyone on Twitter or Facebook, but how many businesses add their customers to their pages? Not many. Silicon Valley has done a horrible job so far of explaining why adding people to your websites matters.
6. It’s smart. We’re seeing more and more smarts added to the web every day. Tonight Wolfram’s new search engine turned on. Have you played with it? That’s the 2010 web and check out what you can do with it.
7. Hybrid infrastructure. When I visited 12seconds.tv in Santa Cruz they told me they were using a hybrid approach: they own a rack of servers but they also use Amazon’s S3 to “cloud burst” or take up the slack for files that are popular. My employer Rackspace will have more to say about that trend too over the next few months.

Anyway, I’m off to New York this week. I’m meeting with Fred Wilson to see what he thinks is happening in the 2010 web. Anyone else got something that will push the web into 2010?

PR People: I even made a place you can pitch me on 2010 web ideas. It’s interesting that a bunch of people are subscribed to that room — probably lots of tech bloggers looking for ideas.

Thanks for sticking with me while I destroyed my blog, now let’s have some fun together!

Oh, last weekend I videoed Jimmy Wales, founder of Wikipedia, as he got onto friendfeed (his new account is here). That’s a fun video too that you might find useful (the first couple minutes have bad video, but it gets better after that). He even admitted to me that Wikipedia is not a good example of a 2010 website and that they are going to be rolling out new features that will make it much more up to date. Can’t wait to see that.

I’m off to bed. Yes, I typed this all after midnight tonight. That’s another thing, no more pre-done packaged crap here.

About Robert Scoble

As Startup Liaison for Rackspace, the Open Cloud Computing Company, I travel the world with Rocky Barbanica looking for what's happening on the bleeding edge of technology and report that here.

188 thoughts on “Exploring the 2010 Web

  1. My company builds websites for builders, roofers and all kinds of small, local businesses–I am constantly amazed at how these people, who are intelligent, hard workers, are so incredibly disconnected when it comes to promoting their work online. Many don't have websites at all, and most of the ones that do are simply awful…yet, they are so resistant to making the investment in a tool that will create more revenue for them…can someone explain this to me? Any ideas?

  2. As a small business owner I would love to have the time to bring my website up to 2010. Or even 2005. I am learning though and the the learning curve is steep because of the main limiting factor is time. But I am learning html, and then I will move onto the next subject and I will get there eventually. If Building43 has a focus on bridging the gap between small non-tech business (retail-service-etc.) and modern tech (social web, cloud, etc) the market is huge and fragmented and potentially very profitable.

  3. As a small business owner I would love to have the time to bring my website up to 2010. Or even 2005. I am learning though and the the learning curve is steep because of the main limiting factor is time. But I am learning html, and then I will move onto the next subject and I will get there eventually. If Building43 has a focus on bridging the gap between small non-tech business (retail-service-etc.) and modern tech (social web, cloud, etc) the market is huge and fragmented and potentially very profitable.

  4. Wow what an amazing informative piece, I am gonna share this anywhere. I honestly just learned about 8 things form this post!

  5. Wow what an amazing informative piece, I am gonna share this anywhere. I honestly just learned about 8 things form this post!

  6. Wow what an amazing informative piece, I am gonna share this anywhere. I honestly just learned about 8 things form this post!

  7. Robert, one of my readers recently commented “My (information) sources include “Twitter, email, RSS, surfing, print media (gasp!), conversations, conferences and dreams. “

    Glad you are focusing on Main Street Businesses. “Web 2010″ for them is a very broad swath we sometimes forget in tech world…

    BTW – loved your “To build something new you have to destroy what you were doing before”. Other than a few exceptions like Intel which eats its own children most vendors are afraid of disruption and would rather market, sue, acquire to disrupt disruption…

  8. Robert, one of my readers recently commented “My (information) sources include “Twitter, email, RSS, surfing, print media (gasp!), conversations, conferences and dreams. “Glad you are focusing on Main Street Businesses. “Web 2010″ for them is a very broad swath we sometimes forget in tech world…BTW – loved your “To build something new you have to destroy what you were doing before”. Other than a few exceptions like Intel which eats its own children most vendors are afraid of disruption and would rather market, sue, acquire to disrupt disruption…

  9. Robert, one of my readers recently commented “My (information) sources include “Twitter, email, RSS, surfing, print media (gasp!), conversations, conferences and dreams. “Glad you are focusing on Main Street Businesses. “Web 2010″ for them is a very broad swath we sometimes forget in tech world…BTW – loved your “To build something new you have to destroy what you were doing before”. Other than a few exceptions like Intel which eats its own children most vendors are afraid of disruption and would rather market, sue, acquire to disrupt disruption…

  10. Regarding the mobile point, I think so too. So don't bloggers set up a mobile web site for their blog. As you are using WordPress their is an excellent plugin developped by Alex King that does everything for you. See it in action here http://mobile.carringtontheme.com/. On the road, it takes me ages to load pages like techcrunch and so on. And I never see the ad anyway.
    Regarding the hybrid infrastructure, I think guys like Rightscale noticed because clients were asking about it. So they are embracing Ubuntu and the integration of Eucalytpus in their management console. So you get the best of the two worlds. See it here http://blog.rightscale.com/2009/04/20/rightscal
    And finally you are right, fun alone is not fun ;-)

  11. Regarding the mobile point, I think so too. So don't bloggers set up a mobile web site for their blog. As you are using WordPress their is an excellent plugin developped by Alex King that does everything for you. See it in action here http://mobile.carringtontheme.com/. On the road, it takes me ages to load pages like techcrunch and so on. And I never see the ad anyway.Regarding the hybrid infrastructure, I think guys like Rightscale noticed because clients were asking about it. So they are embracing Ubuntu and the integration of Eucalytpus in their management console. So you get the best of the two worlds. See it here http://blog.rightscale.com/2009/04/20/rightscal…And finally you are right, fun alone is not fun ;-)

  12. Regarding the mobile point, I think so too. So don't bloggers set up a mobile web site for their blog. As you are using WordPress their is an excellent plugin developped by Alex King that does everything for you. See it in action here http://mobile.carringtontheme.com/. On the road, it takes me ages to load pages like techcrunch and so on. And I never see the ad anyway.Regarding the hybrid infrastructure, I think guys like Rightscale noticed because clients were asking about it. So they are embracing Ubuntu and the integration of Eucalytpus in their management console. So you get the best of the two worlds. See it here http://blog.rightscale.com/2009/04/20/rightscal…And finally you are right, fun alone is not fun ;-)

  13. I completely agree with you that these things need to be simpler. Fortunately, I have Vid to help me out as well (he's awesome), but not all of us are so lucky. That's one thing that Blogger does right – it makes it easy for people to build their sites out. I hope WordPress can take a cue from them to simplify this so everyone can be included. Nice write up. :)

  14. I completely agree with you that these things need to be simpler. Fortunately, I have Vid to help me out as well (he's awesome), but not all of us are so lucky. That's one thing that Blogger does right – it makes it easy for people to build their sites out. I hope WordPress can take a cue from them to simplify this so everyone can be included. Nice write up. :)

  15. I completely agree with you that these things need to be simpler. Fortunately, I have Vid to help me out as well (he's awesome), but not all of us are so lucky. That's one thing that Blogger does right – it makes it easy for people to build their sites out. I hope WordPress can take a cue from them to simplify this so everyone can be included. Nice write up. :)

  16. I like your observations about the discrepancy between the technologically “hip” and the non-tech businesses. I am am still surprised when people don't even see the value in adding a blog to their website.

  17. I like your observations about the discrepancy between the technologically “hip” and the non-tech businesses. I am am still surprised when people don't even see the value in adding a blog to their website.

  18. I like your observations about the discrepancy between the technologically “hip” and the non-tech businesses. I am am still surprised when people don't even see the value in adding a blog to their website.

  19. Honestly, I'm trying not to be a curmudgeon, but I also find that the Google Fiend Connect bar distractingly takes up real estate w/o adding any value.

  20. Honestly, I'm trying not to be a curmudgeon, but I also find that the Google Fiend Connect bar distractingly takes up real estate w/o adding any value.

  21. Honestly, I'm trying not to be a curmudgeon, but I also find that the Google Fiend Connect bar distractingly takes up real estate w/o adding any value.

  22. Hate to sound trite but….. thanks so much for all of the info that you share. You keep pushing me to get it together site wise. Really this is what twitter/ff is all about for me.

  23. Hate to sound trite but….. thanks so much for all of the info that you share. You keep pushing me to get it together site wise. Really this is what twitter/ff is all about for me.

  24. I agree entirely that it is still daunting for the initiated to self publish. I was recently committed to blogging thoughts that to this point I have recorded only for myself. I was very disappointed to find that the basic versions of popular blogging services are actually very limited. In order to use the types of widgets you are discussing and link the blog in all the ways I wanted to I will have to get hosted, learn some coding, etc. This is a significant undertaking for someone who has never coded before, even when motivated.

    One trend that I think you are missing is the blurring of “real world friends” and “internet friends”. To this point most offerings have focused on one or the other. Niche websites, forums, chat rooms, twitter, and blogs have enabled people to find like minded people in the virtual world. Social Networks, email, and IM have helped people better communicate with friends they already know in the real world. As all these services start interconnecting these lines will blur dramatically. Suddenly the professional, the hobbyist, the family member, and the friend will once again all be the same person as the walls between these silos disappear. This will be a powerful trend that influences what types of services are successful, but perhaps more importantly will significantly influence the ways in which we perceive ourselves, organize, and work together.

  25. I agree entirely that it is still daunting for the initiated to self publish. I was recently committed to blogging thoughts that to this point I have recorded only for myself. I was very disappointed to find that the basic versions of popular blogging services are actually very limited. In order to use the types of widgets you are discussing and link the blog in all the ways I wanted to I will have to get hosted, learn some coding, etc. This is a significant undertaking for someone who has never coded before, even when motivated.One trend that I think you are missing is the blurring of “real world friends” and “internet friends”. To this point most offerings have focused on one or the other. Niche websites, forums, chat rooms, twitter, and blogs have enabled people to find like minded people in the virtual world. Social Networks, email, and IM have helped people better communicate with friends they already know in the real world. As all these services start interconnecting these lines will blur dramatically. Suddenly the professional, the hobbyist, the family member, and the friend will once again all be the same person as the walls between these silos disappear. This will be a powerful trend that influences what types of services are successful, but perhaps more importantly will significantly influence the ways in which we perceive ourselves, organize, and work together.

  26. I agree entirely that it is still daunting for the initiated to self publish. I was recently committed to blogging thoughts that to this point I have recorded only for myself. I was very disappointed to find that the basic versions of popular blogging services are actually very limited. In order to use the types of widgets you are discussing and link the blog in all the ways I wanted to I will have to get hosted, learn some coding, etc. This is a significant undertaking for someone who has never coded before, even when motivated.One trend that I think you are missing is the blurring of “real world friends” and “internet friends”. To this point most offerings have focused on one or the other. Niche websites, forums, chat rooms, twitter, and blogs have enabled people to find like minded people in the virtual world. Social Networks, email, and IM have helped people better communicate with friends they already know in the real world. As all these services start interconnecting these lines will blur dramatically. Suddenly the professional, the hobbyist, the family member, and the friend will once again all be the same person as the walls between these silos disappear. This will be a powerful trend that influences what types of services are successful, but perhaps more importantly will significantly influence the ways in which we perceive ourselves, organize, and work together.

  27. Robert,

    Thanks for the signposts for web 2010. Here's some thoughts on the future of our experience of social media that seemed relevant. Mirky waters, I know, but here goes…

    Facebook, Twitter and Friendfeed (sorry MySpace) are in a dead heat race to make the most of the rapidly approaching real time web. Each offers their own, unique package of connectivity and information based on different ideas about how to foster organic human interaction and generate sustainable business growth. Even Google has joined the pack as more and more people use Twitter and Facebook to find information or news rather than search engines.

    Yet as anyone who dabbles in social media will tell you, connectivity and access to information are no longer the problem. In fact, information overload is fast becoming an issue.

    As real time communication becomes a reality, social media will be recast as curation. That means the very same Facebook, Twitter and Friendfeed we now use to get information will be reframed as filters.

    Yet it’s not a knock out competition. Right now we each choose Facebook, Twitter or Friendfeed depending on our preference for how we like to connect with others and information. In exactly the same way, these social networks – and others that aren’t even created yet – will provide of spectrum of choices for how we like to filter information. Our considerations will be the same as ever – how much connectivity we want, our tolerance for exposing our private lives, our comfort level with technology and time constraints.

    So, in a sense, the same technology that allowed us to deep dive into cyberspace to connect and share in unprecedented ways, will now serve to carve out boundaries for the penetration of that information into our lives. They will be seen as tools that allow each of us to shape negative spaces for ourselves in which we are not in communication, cannot be reached and have nothing to share.

    These spaces are the cyber equivalent of ‘going outside for a walk’. Obviously in today’s connected world the ability to communicate has nothing to do with your physical distance from others. Instead, one must increasingly carve out invisible boundaries in black space to define the limits of you as can be experienced by others.

    The subtler differences between the same dynamic in cyberspace and the physical world is that our choice for information is much wider on the web, the available content is therefore much more specific to our personal interests, and, now, the filtering tools are far more sophisticated. Yet the net result is the same – a space reserved solely for ourselves in a world where our real and virtual lives are increasingly blurred.

    This reframing of purpose is important because, even though the user experience may be the same, the dynamic in our relationship with technology and information is headed in the other direction.

    This shift is not linear but part of a larger cycle. The next few years will be characterized by unlimited information, unprecedented connectivity and pride in curatorship. No doubt technology or human ingenuity with then provide a further redefinition of how we live that will initiate the next iteration of this cycle. For new technology must always engage with certain timeless qualities of the human condition that include the competing needs for privacy and connection.

    As ever, thanks for the thinking and inspiration, Robert. There were some great conversations floating around the future today. Much appreciated.
    http://www.simonmainwaring.com/blog

  28. Robert,Thanks for the signposts for web 2010. Here's some thoughts on the future of our experience of social media that seemed relevant. Mirky waters, I know, but here goes…Facebook, Twitter and Friendfeed (sorry MySpace) are in a dead heat race to make the most of the rapidly approaching real time web. Each offers their own, unique package of connectivity and information based on different ideas about how to foster organic human interaction and generate sustainable business growth. Even Google has joined the pack as more and more people use Twitter and Facebook to find information or news rather than search engines.Yet as anyone who dabbles in social media will tell you, connectivity and access to information are no longer the problem. In fact, information overload is fast becoming an issue.As real time communication becomes a reality, social media will be recast as curation. That means the very same Facebook, Twitter and Friendfeed we now use to get information will be reframed as filters.Yet it’s not a knock out competition. Right now we each choose Facebook, Twitter or Friendfeed depending on our preference for how we like to connect with others and information. In exactly the same way, these social networks – and others that aren’t even created yet – will provide of spectrum of choices for how we like to filter information. Our considerations will be the same as ever – how much connectivity we want, our tolerance for exposing our private lives, our comfort level with technology and time constraints.So, in a sense, the same technology that allowed us to deep dive into cyberspace to connect and share in unprecedented ways, will now serve to carve out boundaries for the penetration of that information into our lives. They will be seen as tools that allow each of us to shape negative spaces for ourselves in which we are not in communication, cannot be reached and have nothing to share.These spaces are the cyber equivalent of ‘going outside for a walk’. Obviously in today’s connected world the ability to communicate has nothing to do with your physical distance from others. Instead, one must increasingly carve out invisible boundaries in black space to define the limits of you as can be experienced by others.The subtler differences between the same dynamic in cyberspace and the physical world is that our choice for information is much wider on the web, the available content is therefore much more specific to our personal interests, and, now, the filtering tools are far more sophisticated. Yet the net result is the same – a space reserved solely for ourselves in a world where our real and virtual lives are increasingly blurred.This reframing of purpose is important because, even though the user experience may be the same, the dynamic in our relationship with technology and information is headed in the other direction.This shift is not linear but part of a larger cycle. The next few years will be characterized by unlimited information, unprecedented connectivity and pride in curatorship. No doubt technology or human ingenuity with then provide a further redefinition of how we live that will initiate the next iteration of this cycle. For new technology must always engage with certain timeless qualities of the human condition that include the competing needs for privacy and connection.As ever, thanks for the thinking and inspiration, Robert. There were some great conversations floating around the future today. Much appreciated.http://www.simonmainwaring.com/blog

  29. Robert,Thanks for the signposts for web 2010. Here's some thoughts on the future of our experience of social media that seemed relevant. Mirky waters, I know, but here goes…Facebook, Twitter and Friendfeed (sorry MySpace) are in a dead heat race to make the most of the rapidly approaching real time web. Each offers their own, unique package of connectivity and information based on different ideas about how to foster organic human interaction and generate sustainable business growth. Even Google has joined the pack as more and more people use Twitter and Facebook to find information or news rather than search engines.Yet as anyone who dabbles in social media will tell you, connectivity and access to information are no longer the problem. In fact, information overload is fast becoming an issue.As real time communication becomes a reality, social media will be recast as curation. That means the very same Facebook, Twitter and Friendfeed we now use to get information will be reframed as filters.Yet it’s not a knock out competition. Right now we each choose Facebook, Twitter or Friendfeed depending on our preference for how we like to connect with others and information. In exactly the same way, these social networks – and others that aren’t even created yet – will provide of spectrum of choices for how we like to filter information. Our considerations will be the same as ever – how much connectivity we want, our tolerance for exposing our private lives, our comfort level with technology and time constraints.So, in a sense, the same technology that allowed us to deep dive into cyberspace to connect and share in unprecedented ways, will now serve to carve out boundaries for the penetration of that information into our lives. They will be seen as tools that allow each of us to shape negative spaces for ourselves in which we are not in communication, cannot be reached and have nothing to share.These spaces are the cyber equivalent of ‘going outside for a walk’. Obviously in today’s connected world the ability to communicate has nothing to do with your physical distance from others. Instead, one must increasingly carve out invisible boundaries in black space to define the limits of you as can be experienced by others.The subtler differences between the same dynamic in cyberspace and the physical world is that our choice for information is much wider on the web, the available content is therefore much more specific to our personal interests, and, now, the filtering tools are far more sophisticated. Yet the net result is the same – a space reserved solely for ourselves in a world where our real and virtual lives are increasingly blurred.This reframing of purpose is important because, even though the user experience may be the same, the dynamic in our relationship with technology and information is headed in the other direction.This shift is not linear but part of a larger cycle. The next few years will be characterized by unlimited information, unprecedented connectivity and pride in curatorship. No doubt technology or human ingenuity with then provide a further redefinition of how we live that will initiate the next iteration of this cycle. For new technology must always engage with certain timeless qualities of the human condition that include the competing needs for privacy and connection.As ever, thanks for the thinking and inspiration, Robert. There were some great conversations floating around the future today. Much appreciated.http://www.simonmainwaring.com/blog

  30. Hi Robert,

    It's great that you are choosing to tackle this topic.

    Building better interaction between people is something I've been working on from different angles for a while.

    At Live Chat Concepts inc, we just launched our first beta test concept site at http://www.LiveBaseballChat.com

    This destination website enables people to interact and chat with each other while watching the MLB2009 baseball games.

    Offering people tools to chat about sports (or toyotas) can only bring about richer interaction in peoples lives.

    Cheers,
    Dean Collins
    http://www.LivebaseballChat.com

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