Dueling video search engines on ScobleShow

Got an interesting interview with Suranga Chandratillake, CEO of Blinkx, which is a video search engine hoping to be the next YouTube. But he reminded me that they aren’t competing with YouTube. Listen to the videos to learn more about the new video search sites.

[podtech content=http://media.podtech.net/media/2007/01/PID_001902/Podtech_Blinkx_CEO_interview.flv&postURL=http://www.podtech.net/scobleshow/technology/1328/video-searching-with-blinkx-ceo&totalTime=2112000&breadcrumb=3F34K2L1]

Compare Blinkx with Dabble. A few weeks ago Maryam and I sat down with Dabble’s CEO, Mary Hodder. Check out all the stickers on her laptop (that part is toward the end of her interview)!

Links: http://www.blinkx.com and http://www.dabble.com.

Personally I like Dabble better, what about you?

[podtech content=http://media.podtech.net/media/2007/01/PID_001774/Podtech_dabble_interview.flv&postURL=http://www.podtech.net/scobleshow/technology/1316/whos-hotter-than-mary-hodder&totalTime=1992000&breadcrumb=3F34K2L1]

Meet a really famous “Internet”ian — Tango Diva’s Teresa

Forbes magazine totally missed out on the really famous Internet personality from Half Moon Bay (she lives just a few houses away from me): Teresa Williamson.

How do I know she’s famous? Cause tomorrow morning she’s gonna be on Regis and Kelly (more people watch that in one second than read my blog in a year), talking about her new book, “Fly Solo”, which is for single women who want to travel. Not to mention she’s been in tons of magazines and newspapers lately (I saw her mug on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle a few weeks back, and saw her name in Cosmopolitan, among other mags).

Her travel site, Tango Diva, is white hot too. If I were really a good Vice President, I’d buy it for PodTech. But, I’m still hundreds of emails in the hole. So, enough blogging work avoidance. Talk to you soon.

Hey Microsoft: look to Krugle for your search woes (at least for your developers)

It’s just amazing to me that Microsoft has continued with a failed search strategy, even after it’s apparent to EVERYONE (including Microsoft’s CFO) that what they are doing isn’t working. Hint: it ain’t gonna work, even if they flush another billion or two down the “copy Google” toilet.

So, what should their strategy be? Go for a little cut against Google. Don’t try to attack Google’s castle head on. That won’t work. Instead, flank them.

Start by surrounding Google with lots of niche engines. Technorati showed the way three years ago, even though Google has largely caught up now, by doing Blog Search, which was something that Google didn’t do well (still doesn’t really: if someone wants to find a blog on, say, Scrapbooking, what search engine really gives a nice set of blogs? Neither Technorati, nor Google’s blog search engines do.

But, there’s another engine that’s showing a way to start building a more successful search strategy: Krugle.

Buy it, and buy it now.

Why? Cause it’s a search engine for developers. Go talk to Steve Ballmer about that one. Remember him screaming “developers, developers, developers?” Well, Krugle delivers.

Krugle does something demonstratable that Google does not do: searches code and indexes it and helps developers in a real, demonstrable way.

Here’s an example. If you’re a Windows programmer you probably will need to look up some API name, like “DestroyWindow,” to learn more about it. Krugle’s search for DestroyWindow not only has links to the proper MSDN page, but shows off book mentions and code, and links to examples of its use in code.

I keep hearing about Krugle from developers. They tell me it rocks for looking up stuff. Need shopping cart code? Search for it on Krugle. Now compare that to Google/Yahoo/MSN.

Now, I can hear you now “developers don’t matter to search engines.”

Oh, yeah? When I visit Google there’s a huge plasma screen that shows every Google search done in real-time (it only shows that a search was done, not what the search was about). Everytime I look at that screen Redmond, WA does more Google searches than most other large cities in the world and does more Google searches than the entire continent of Africa.

Hint: there’s not much in Redmond except for Microsoft. So, what are all those Microsofties doing on Google?

I bet they are doing searches for technical information and looking for code samples, error names, algorithm tips, and API names.

I remember talking to tons of developers on the Windows team about why they love Google: it was the best engine three years ago, by far, to look up information on Microsoft’s own Web site!

That brand love for Google spread from geeks and developers to others in society. Don’t underestimate the influence that developers have here. YOUR OWN DEVELOPERS MICROSOFT!!!

So, start small. Don’t try to be Google. Why don’t you buy Krugle, get a position in search, then build on that?

It sure couldn’t hurt. What you’re doing now sure ain’t working.

Welcome from Forbes, but…

I see a lot of people coming here from a Forbes list of who they think are the top 25 Internet Celebrities. I’m very honored to be #9 on that list, but a couple of things I’d like to correct. First, I’m a tech blogger, the article says I’m a political blogger. Both my blog here, and my video show at http://www.scobleshow.com (more videos coming today), are mostly about the tech industry. Second, there’s no mention of PodTech, which, is more important to me now than leaving Microsoft. A good place to learn about me is on the Wikipedia page about me. Oh, and I have a Wikipedia policy. I will not edit my page, nor will I pay anyone to edit that page on my behalf, and if I ever want something changed on that page, I’ll just blog it so it’ll be out in the open and transparent. I have not written a single word on that Wikipedia page and I’m quite amazed at how complete and accurate it is. Thank you to whoever contributes to that page.

I agree with Mike Arrington: I can think of 100 people who are more deserving (and who are more interesting than me). I also am not real happy being on a list where the #1 person is a fictional person. Personally, I’d rather give up my spot on that list to someone who actually DID something for the Web. Tim Berners-Lee or Dave Winer or Tim Bray come to mind (the first Tim invented the Web, Dave invented RSS/OPML/XML-RPC, Tim Bray co-invented XML).

I’m still mostly taking this week off of my blog. I’m totally snowed under with email and other tasks. Did four interviews yesterday that you’ll really like. And on Tuesday I got a good look at the Stanford Linear Accelerator and interviewed the team that did the first Web site in the United States. Really amazing people there.

Oh, I wish I could get to Lunch 2.0 today at Meebo. You’re invited. So was I, but I have to chew through my task list.